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Old 12-20-2018, 06:21 PM
 
Location: Virginia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2ner View Post
I live in metro DC (USDA Horticultural Zone 7a) and am interested in planting types of evergreen trees to include some of the more unusual species. Currently, I have cryptomeria, china firs, deodar cedars, Atlas cedars, cedar of Lebanon, umbrella pine, Turkish firs. Any suggestions? Thanks in advance.
I live just a little south of you, and would like to suggest Gold Mop Cypress. The two I had in my old yard got to be about 12 ft. tall and really made a unique bright spot of color, particularly during the winter. I provided no care whatsoever to them after planting (great soil with a high water table, full sun) and they just flourished. The only thing I would have done differently would have been to plant them even further apart, as I really didn't expect them to get that tall or to spread as much as they did. Really nice trees!
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Old 01-27-2019, 04:39 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
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Excuse me if someone else suggested this, but there are numerous species of evergreen oaks. The most obvious is southern live oak. Holly oak, cork oak are others. Monterrey oak is mostly evergreen, I think. (I'm not sure the ones I mentioned are hardy in 7a, but they're hardy in my area (Phoenix.)
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Old Today, 01:26 PM
 
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Originally Posted by DougStark View Post
Excuse me if someone else suggested this, but there are numerous species of evergreen oaks. The most obvious is southern live oak. Holly oak, cork oak are others. Monterrey oak is mostly evergreen, I think. (I'm not sure the ones I mentioned are hardy in 7a, but they're hardy in my area (Phoenix.)

well Phoenix (USDA 9b/10) is indeed very different in both heat and moisture patterns than DC (USDA 7b) and likely those differences especially obvious right now (Feb. 1, 2019) sad to say. however, some evergreen oaks might be worth trying including hardy selections of quercus virginiana (southern live oak) that you mentioned and it's potentially even hardier close relation q. fusiformis (q. virginiana ssp. fusiformis from west Texas) plus the Japanese live oak (q. myrsinifolia). holly oak and cork oak may be less viable because they generally do not grow well in hot humid summer areas like the east coast. other oaks to try include q. turbinella and q. hypoleucoides and likely some others as well. the eastern native q. laurifolia/laurel oak may be semi-evergreen in mild winters and protected locations. hardier forms of southern magnolia/magnolia grandiflora and evergreen forms of sweetbay/m. virginiana ssp. australis might also be worth looking into.

Last edited by georgeinbandonoregon; Today at 01:59 PM..
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Old Today, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
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^^^ George, good ideas. BTW, this winter I ordered a seedling chinkapin oak (white oak family, deciduous) I have no idea if it will survive Phoenix summers, but I'm adventuresome I chose this species because they are reportedly tolerant of alkaline soils--we have plenty of that here. It just arrived today in good shape (dormant.)

I also ordered an Atlas Cedar because I'm crazy about Cedrus species. After seeing how beautiful they in CA, I really want one to succeed here. Supposedly the Atlas Cedar is the most heat-tolerant of the 3 species. I've never seen one in metro-Phoenix yards, but apparently there is one growing at the Univ. of AZ, Tucson (slightly cooler than Phx.)
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Old Today, 07:30 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DougStark View Post
^^^ George, good ideas. BTW, this winter I ordered a seedling chinkapin oak (white oak family, deciduous) I have no idea if it will survive Phoenix summers, but I'm adventuresome I chose this species because they are reportedly tolerant of alkaline soils--we have plenty of that here. It just arrived today in good shape (dormant.)

I also ordered an Atlas Cedar because I'm crazy about Cedrus species. After seeing how beautiful they in CA, I really want one to succeed here. Supposedly the Atlas Cedar is the most heat-tolerant of the 3 species. I've never seen one in metro-Phoenix yards, but apparently there is one growing at the Univ. of AZ, Tucson (slightly cooler than Phx.)


good luck. there are actually some chinquapin oaks that are native to west Texas and into New Mexico so likely there are forms and selections that are more adapted to the S.W. that said, I would respectfully suggest that you give the plants lots of water during the hot season especially in the first few years in the ground---it is NOT a low desert plant and so will likely appreciate being planted in a lawn/turf area rather than in a cactus or agave bed. other oaks from parts of the s.w. that might be worth growing include the evergreen quercus hypoleucoides, and turbinella, plus q. arizonica (Arizona white oak), q. oblongifolia (Mexican blue oak), q. emoryi (Apache oak), also q. ilex (holly oak), q. suber (cork oak) and the deciduous q. buckleyi (Texas red oak). FWIW would also suggest you plant the cedrus in a spot with some afternoon shade a good book with lots of suggestions for plants for your area is "landscape plants for dry reasons" by Warren Jones and Charles Saccamano. again. good luck with all your plans, plants, and plantings.
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