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Old 12-08-2018, 11:07 AM
 
Location: DC metropolitan area
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I live in metro DC (USDA Horticultural Zone 7a) and am interested in planting types of evergreen trees to include some of the more unusual species. Currently, I have cryptomeria, china firs, deodar cedars, Atlas cedars, cedar of Lebanon, umbrella pine, Turkish firs. Any suggestions? Thanks in advance.
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Old 12-08-2018, 01:02 PM
 
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well you might consider broadleaf evergreens like selections of southern maganolia, sweetbay (magnolia virginiana), various rhododendrons like the native r. maximum and r. catawbiense, mountain laurel (kalmia latifolia)---those three can become nice small trees over time and with proper "training", southern bayberry (myrica cerifera) and American holly (ilex opauca) plus several evergreen viburnums which can be trained into small trees and even some hardy camellias. like c. olifera for conifers you might consider some of the southern pines like loblolly pine, some Asiatic firs like abies firma, some redwood relatives like taxodium or glyptostrobus (aka "Chinese water fir")---though both of these are winter deciduous. nurseries like "rarefind" and "woodlanders" which stock rare and unusual plants might be worthwhile looking into and of course the collections in the National Arboretum may show more stuff that is adapted to your area. like hope this helps.

Last edited by georgeinbandonoregon; 12-08-2018 at 02:07 PM..
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Old 12-08-2018, 07:03 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
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Well, I don't know how unusual it is, but I'm rather partial to the varieties of blue noble firs. https://www.bing.com/images/search?q...ir&FORM=IDINTS

Some other evergreen ideas in pictures (some have very colorful cones): https://www.pinterest.ca/pin/330381322654639216/

.
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Old 12-08-2018, 08:48 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Well, I don't know how unusual it is, but I'm rather partial to the varieties of blue noble firs. https://www.bing.com/images/search?q...ir&FORM=IDINTS

Some other evergreen ideas in pictures (some have very colorful cones): https://www.pinterest.ca/pin/330381322654639216/

.

it's a beautiful tree but many of the west coast abies species cannot take the hot humid summers on the other side of the country. OTOH, some forms of abies concolor/white fir and a. subalpina/subalpine fir from the Rocky Mtns. where some summer rain does occur might be worth trying.
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Old 12-09-2018, 08:07 AM
 
Location: DC metropolitan area
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Thank you for the feedback!

Magnolia and holly do well in this area and would provide a nice contrast to the other trees.

It's nice that at least one fir, Abies firma, would do well here.… most firs do horribly in this hot, humid-summer place. I tried the noble fir years back and it died that same summer. I also tried the concolor fir twice. The first time they all died. The second time, 1 out of 5 survived the first summer and made it into its 3rd summer, but then died. It had afternoon shade. Interestingly, there are a few big, mature ones in Crystal City, VA (across the Potomac River from DC). They probably do well because of the shade cast by the surrounding skyrise buildings.

The neighbor's place is 20 acres of open land. In the winter, the winds decimated/dessicated a line of camelia planted on the property line. Under a grove of hemlock, however, the rhododendron are thriving. I tried the bayberry, but it died. I will look into the "Chinese water fir" as well (sounds exotic).

Last edited by 2ner; 12-09-2018 at 08:18 AM..
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Old 12-09-2018, 10:22 PM
 
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Originally Posted by 2ner View Post
Thank you for the feedback!

Magnolia and holly do well in this area and would provide a nice contrast to the other trees.

It's nice that at least one fir, Abies firma, would do well here. most firs do horribly in this hot, humid-summer place. I tried the noble fir years back and it died that same summer. I also tried the concolor fir twice. The first time they all died. The second time, 1 out of 5 survived the first summer and made it into its 3rd summer, but then died. It had afternoon shade. Interestingly, there are a few big, mature ones in Crystal City, VA (across the Potomac River from DC). They probably do well because of the shade cast by the surrounding skyrise buildings.

The neighbor's place is 20 acres of open land. In the winter, the winds decimated/dessicated a line of camelia planted on the property line. Under a grove of hemlock, however, the rhododendron are thriving. I tried the bayberry, but it died. I will look into the "Chinese water fir" as well (sounds exotic).

interesting. FWIW, I might suggest that unless you are absolutely sure of "iron-clad" hardiness from a broadleaf evergreen (or for that matter any other kind of plant) that you try to plant in as "favorable" a micro-climate as possible---which in many cases means sheltered from cold (and dessicating) winter winds and early morning winter sun. as you already mentioned, part shade in the summer (plus maybe mulching around the base of the plants to keep the roots cool in the summer (and warmer in the winter!!!) can also be potentially useful. again, the camellias I referred to are NOT the standard c. japonica but c. olifera which is a generally hardier plant (but still would appreciate that "favorable" spot mentioned earlier). the glyptostrobus/aka "Chinese water fir" is very closely related to metasequoia and is deciduous just like that plant. good luck in your planting and growing.
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Old 12-12-2018, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Floribama
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One of my favorite pines is Spruce Pine (Pinus glabra). They are native to the lower South, but worth trying farther north. Very dark green needles and the bark looks more like a hardwood.
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Old 12-12-2018, 10:37 AM
 
11,568 posts, read 17,094,084 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2ner View Post
I live in metro DC (USDA Horticultural Zone 7a) and am interested in planting types of evergreen trees to include some of the more unusual species. Currently, I have cryptomeria, china firs, deodar cedars, Atlas cedars, cedar of Lebanon, umbrella pine, Turkish firs. Any suggestions? Thanks in advance.
I live in the DC area as well.

I have a Monkey Puzzle tree in my backyard. Bought a small one that barley reached a foot off of eBay about 10 years ago. It is nearly 10 feet tall now and doing quite well.

If you have the space, Redwoods and Sequoias do grow here.
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Old 12-12-2018, 11:24 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
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I just got one of these cypress. It’s still small, but it will be very striking. It’s a pale, icy blue green.

https://www.wilsonbrosgardens.com/Ca...a-Cypress.html

As Moth said, Monkey puzzle trees are very unusual looking. I saw many mature ones in England, but had never seen one here.
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Old 12-13-2018, 03:51 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
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I think I have read that there hollies for every climate. We have enjoyed our two, which have quickly grown. They need at least one male to pollinate a single or several hollies. You are right. Their foliage is interesting to look at, and contrasts with needled evergreens. Our hollies here in S-W Washington State are a beautiful dark, glossy green.
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