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Old Yesterday, 06:12 AM
 
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The only healthy trees I'm aware of that lose their leaves in the middle of summer are those that are drought tolerant, native to deserts and drop leaves in order to prevent moisture loss. They are not diseased. They often have green bark in order to continue photosynthesis without leaves.

Last edited by marino760; Yesterday at 06:24 AM..
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Old Yesterday, 06:41 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
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Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
The only healthy trees I'm aware of that lose their leaves in the middle of summer are those that are drought tolerant, native to deserts and drop leaves in order to prevent moisture loss. They are not diseased. They often have green bark in order to continue photosynthesis without leaves.
There are many diseases and pest that affect trees and that is not even counting draught/fire. Gypsy moths and lanternflies will strip the foliage and some of the trees will survive and some will die. The fire blight is like that and the trees will fight a valiant fight but most loose in the end. There are simply so many pest and diseases that it is hard to tell if the trees are late getting their foliage or if they have been stripped; especially when viewed from a distance. Of course the trees weakened will sometimes loose their foliage prematurely. One would almost have to study each tree to determine the culprit and sometimes it is not clear.
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Old Yesterday, 07:33 AM
 
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Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
There are many diseases and pest that affect trees and that is not even counting draught/fire. Gypsy moths and lanternflies will strip the foliage and some of the trees will survive and some will die. The fire blight is like that and the trees will fight a valiant fight but most loose in the end. There are simply so many pest and diseases that it is hard to tell if the trees are late getting their foliage or if they have been stripped; especially when viewed from a distance. Of course the trees weakened will sometimes loose their foliage prematurely. One would almost have to study each tree to determine the culprit and sometimes it is not clear.
Yes, that's why I said healthy trees don't lose their leaves in summer. Of course, insects and animals defoliating trees is part of that.
I once had several fruitless mulberies. It was mid June and I couldn't figure out why one tree wasn't coming out of dormancy but was still alive without any signs of disease. Then I watched a ground squirrel climbing the tree and removing and eating any swelling buds which would produce new leaves. That one squirrel chose that one tree and the tree regrew leaves once I had disposed of the squirrel.
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Old Yesterday, 07:58 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
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Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
Yes, that's why I said healthy trees don't lose their leaves in summer. Of course, insects and animals defoliating trees is part of that.
I once had several fruitless mulberies. It was mid June and I couldn't figure out why one tree wasn't coming out of dormancy but was still alive without any signs of disease. Then I watched a ground squirrel climbing the tree and removing and eating any swelling buds which would produce new leaves. That one squirrel chose that one tree and the tree regrew leaves once I had disposed of the squirrel.
I have watched grey squirrels nick the bark of maple trees to drink the sap. I guess that is how they get their daily allotment of sugar! Destructive little buggers! Little things like that can be overlooked when we see these defoliated trees from afar. So the answer to the OP's question is very complicated.
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Old Today, 10:42 AM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
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Trees leaf out in quick succession here in the PNW. Spring is my favorite time of year. Only nine or so weeks until it begins. Countdown begins on January 1.
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