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Old 12-31-2018, 11:46 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
I'm also in zone 8b, but in San Jose area. My thought was to see what's thriving in your area, if that's possible. For instance, in the old neighborhood I live in, I can see which fruit trees do great. Lots of ripe citrus right now around here, from persimmons to lemons to tangerines to limes and oranges, etc. You probably can't go wrong with citrus.

If you have a decent nursery (not a big box store), you could ask what thrives in the area.
Thank you.

Thatís the point, iíve been told that fruit trees do well in this valley particularly like stone fruits such as apple, pears, cherry, nectarine and plum. But if I go purely by # chill hours Iíd be hard pressed to find a decent variety for this area. So judging the # chill hours is not consistent with local history.

Good idea about local nursery. They will have fruit trees for sale this month. Iíll go check them out what fruit trees are they selling and maybe pick up a couple more trees.
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Old 01-02-2019, 04:13 AM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
17,271 posts, read 21,283,565 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HB2HSV View Post
Thank you.

Thatís the point, iíve been told that fruit trees do well in this valley particularly like stone fruits such as apple, pears, cherry, nectarine and plum. But if I go purely by # chill hours Iíd be hard pressed to find a decent variety for this area. So judging the # chill hours is not consistent with local history.

Good idea about local nursery. They will have fruit trees for sale this month. Iíll go check them out what fruit trees are they selling and maybe pick up a couple more trees.
I've never thought about chill hours, to be honest. I wonder if you might get some good info from your local county extension office, if you have one. Or if you have an agricultural school in your area with info on good varieties for the area. When I lived in Davis, for instance, UC Davis has an agricultural department and they publish all kinds of articles about crop varieties, etc. And I've used county extension offices for info on pests and suggestions for cash crops, etc., when I lived in the boonies.

Let us know what you decided to try and good luck.
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Old 01-02-2019, 06:29 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
I've never thought about chill hours, to be honest. I wonder if you might get some good info from your local county extension office, if you have one. Or if you have an agricultural school in your area with info on good varieties for the area. When I lived in Davis, for instance, UC Davis has an agricultural department and they publish all kinds of articles about crop varieties, etc. And I've used county extension offices for info on pests and suggestions for cash crops, etc., when I lived in the boonies.

Let us know what you decided to try and good luck.
You have to think about chill hours if you intend your fruit tree to produce fruit. There's a wealth of information on the internet regarding the number of chill hours needed for specific fruit trees in order for them to produce fruit, but your suggestion is a good one.
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Old 01-06-2019, 11:30 PM
 
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Update:

I visited my local nursery and they have bare roots fruit trees in for Spring already. They have lots of Cherry trees for sale including Bing, Rainier, etc., all of which requires much higher chill hours than what I understand my area can support. I asked one guy who works there, an old guy, if Cherry such as Bing which requires 700-800 chill hours can do well here? He said oh yes, they do quite well in this valley. Judging the amount of trees they have for sale, itís obvious that they are not worried if it will sell. The tree tags are from Dave Wilson nursery which is a very reputable wholesaler in California.

So thatís a good news for me as I ordered Lapins which only requires 300-400 chill hours and if other varieties such as Bing that requires 700-800 chill hours will work around here then obviously something with less chill hours will do well here.

So either I am mistaken about the chill hours in my area from map such as link below
https://www.tomorrowsharvest.com/pla...s-chill-hours/

Or the chill hours is not a true indication of fruitís ability to produce. Either way, I remain skeptical at this point.
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Old 01-07-2019, 06:26 AM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
2,046 posts, read 739,026 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HB2HSV View Post

He said oh yes, they do quite well in this valley. Judging the amount of trees they have for sale, itís obvious that they are not worried if it will sell.

.

As others mentioned above--does "doing well" mean they survive or that they survive AND bear fruit well?


Maybe they sell a lot of cherry trees only because they convince potential buyers the trees will "do well" without defining it. Caveat emptor.
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Old 01-07-2019, 10:25 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guidoLaMoto View Post
As others mentioned above--does "doing well" mean they survive or that they survive AND bear fruit well?

Maybe they sell a lot of cherry trees only because they convince potential buyers the trees will "do well" without defining it. Caveat emptor.
Itís a valid question. The way I look at it, this local nursery has a good reputation. Folks around here I asked spoke highly of them. They donít get this reputation by lying to customers.

Also from personal experience having lived here a year, the winter gets cold here through March so itís hard to believe we only have 200 chill hours.
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Old Yesterday, 11:33 AM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
2,046 posts, read 739,026 times
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Maybe this will help: Weather-Related Models & Services - Fruit & Nut Research & Information Center


or call your county extension agent. He can be quite helpful (unless his name is Hank Kimball
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Old Yesterday, 12:04 PM
 
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I am in zone 7 and I remember the year I planted over 100 tulip bulbs. Some of them did come up but the flowers were pitiful. I then found out that it doesn't get (or stay) cold enough here in Charlotte for pretty tulips.
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Old Yesterday, 01:46 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
6,368 posts, read 6,025,708 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HB2HSV View Post

Also from personal experience having lived here a year, the winter gets cold here through March so itís hard to believe we only have 200 chill hours.
One year living in your location isn't nearly long enough for you to be familiar with your location's climate. Give it 5 years and you'll have a better idea of what to expect.


.
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Old Yesterday, 05:27 PM
 
Location: Maine
6,002 posts, read 11,227,886 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HB2HSV View Post
Which one should I go with? I had assumed if a fruit tree meets the USDA zone it means it will grow well and produce fruits. Now they introduce another criterion which is not consistent with the previous one.

What say you?
Chill hours is additional information. It is consistent but not known well enough to be common.

USDA zones define hardiness. This plant will probably survive temperatures as low as XįF. It's often confused as a "grow zone." This plant will grow in this zone. It's survival, not growth.

In addition, some plants need cold weather/chill hours. The plants will probably survive but won't produce well if they don't get enough cold time.
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