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Old 01-03-2019, 01:17 PM
 
193 posts, read 34,210 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xPlorer48 View Post
We have 6 acres in the PNW so can grow just about anything. We have a 15’ Sequoia that we hope whoever buys our home in the future doesn’t cut down.
Maybe place a sign or plaque by it saying what it is and its potential. People are cheesy though, I have seen people cut down the most beautiful trees for the most trivial reasons.
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Old 01-03-2019, 03:17 PM
 
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An oak tree is stately, grows old gracefully and is very hardy.
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Old 01-03-2019, 05:23 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
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Has anyone tried one of the many new dutch elm disease resistant elms? Many varieties to choose from. Probably none would survive Phoenix heat though.
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Old 01-03-2019, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Forest bathing
1,405 posts, read 774,619 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DirtBikeRider View Post
Maybe place a sign or plaque by it saying what it is and its potential. People are cheesy though, I have seen people cut down the most beautiful trees for the most trivial reasons.
I did hang Copper tags that say what they are even the newly planted trees. But, a plaque would be nice, too, especially the ones from Yosemite (corrected from a Sequioa National Park). Yes, I have seen beautiful trees cut down, too. Our own county courthouse has a large Metasequioa on its grounds. The architectural firm wanted to cut it down so their grandiose monument to their egos would infringe on the tree. Thankfully, citizens discovered this and put a stop to it, one of the few times the council or executive listened to the people who vote them in. It was planted decades ago and still stands.
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Old 01-03-2019, 06:13 PM
 
1,564 posts, read 759,800 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DirtBikeRider View Post
Maybe place a sign or plaque by it saying what it is and its potential. People are cheesy though, I have seen people cut down the most beautiful trees for the most trivial reasons.

There was a beautiful bing cherry tree in my husband's nephew's yard when he bought a house. The tree had been there for generations, and it produced enough cherries to feed the entire neighborhood. Everyone loved that tree. He immediately cut the tree down so he wouldn't have to clean up cherry blossoms on the ground every spring. Then he sold the house two years later. Sad.


I think I'd plant a bicycle tree for future generations. https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/...land-bike-tree

Last edited by oldgardener; 01-03-2019 at 06:24 PM..
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Old 01-03-2019, 07:43 PM
 
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Depends on climate / region and topography. In our zone I would choose any of the more colorful Beech (Fagus)/ Oak (Quercus) family but am partial to the kaleidoscope of foliage found on Black Gum (Nyssa Sylvatica). We have a beautiful one nearby in the local metropark system and every fall the array of colors is stunning on its skyline twin massive trunk with low side branches in an open meadow amidst the river valley plain.

If tropical climate I'd go with Ficus Benghalensis (Banyan).

I say topography because most people plant trees intended to last generations in prominent locations all alone as sentinels and not all generational trees I've encountered would like a prominent landmark amidst open area as its choice location. I enjoy the massive Hemlocks that grow in ravines in a wood but they wouldn't necessarily look as good as a sole sentinel on an open landscape. Some trees are more impressive in a grove IMO if space allows: Beeches, Birches, Sycamore, as examples.
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Old 01-03-2019, 08:57 PM
 
638 posts, read 148,336 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xPlorer48 View Post
We have 6 acres in the PNW so can grow just about anything. We have a 15’ Sequoia that we hope whoever buys our home in the future doesn’t cut down. There are also 4 Sequioas we received from a neighbor who had a cabin in Sequioa National Park. The largest is 6’.

We have some old second growth Douglas Fir, Cedar, Spruce and Hemlock that are from 4’- 6’ in diameter at the base. We hope they stay, too. Since we moved here over 30 years ago, over 100 acres have been cut down for homes. We are planting trees every year, some native, some not. This year we planted native dogwood, Douglas maple, Sitka Spruce and vine maple for natives and oaks, birches and maples for fall color that are not native. We fertilize them in the early spring with fertilizer spikes.

We also have several mature ornamental deciduous trees we planted through the years including a beech, Katsura, dogwood, and Japanese maples.

Oh, wow. You sound like me. Do you buy your trees from Weyerhauser when they have their yearly sale? We have about 28 acres. Some of it is forest, and now that we no longer have livestock I am planting the rest. I have planted Sequoia, Douglas, spruce, Noble, etc. I have planted a couple Camperdown elms by the house. They don't get huge, but they attain a decent size and are gnarly. There are some on the capital grounds in Oregon. I want a ginko tree, some dogwoods (my native dogwood died) and some more Japanese maples. I am a tree freak!

What I am unhappy about is the increasing fire danger. I am hoping we don't have another dry summer. Climate change sucks.
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Old 01-04-2019, 02:33 AM
 
Location: Eugene, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
Assuming I had the space, and that the space was protected, this is what I would plant:

Metasequoia glyptostroboides 'Raven' SHAW'S LEGACY - Plant Finder

Dawn Redwood Raven
A good tree, but I'll take the giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) I have in my front yard, as it is evergreen. It's just 28 ft. tall now, but in a couple of hundred years, if there's still people living here, they may have harsh words for me, as it may have taken over the property.The neighborhood cats love it and come here often to rub their fur on it. It has a substance on its foliage that repels fleas and lice.
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Old 01-04-2019, 09:47 AM
 
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Acer Rubrum / Acer Palmatum (Suminagashi)
Southern Live Oak
Cherry Blossom
With enough land: Giant Sequoia.
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Old 01-04-2019, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Floyd Co, VA
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Another possibility is Ginkgo, a very long lived tree.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ginkgo_biloba
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