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Old Yesterday, 08:05 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
35,439 posts, read 43,627,916 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeyyc View Post
Araucaria araucana or Monkey Puzzle


It's a living dinosaur, and cool looking as heck, and will live nearly anywhere.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Araucaria_araucana
I first saw them in England. They are very striking, but I really do not like ďouchyĒ plants.
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Old Yesterday, 10:37 AM
 
Location: The Woods
16,595 posts, read 21,722,960 times
Reputation: 8650
Quote:
Originally Posted by southernnaturelover View Post
Hopefully your Ash will stay healthy until the borers have moved on through. Thereís needs to be some survivors to create seedlings in the future. Iím hoping EAB will be like a wildfire and will burn itself out eventually.
I hoped that myself but areas that saw the earliest wave of EAB are having new outbreaks as the previously immature ash matures enough to be attractive to them and as survivors get hit.

The EAB is about 10 miles from my own land. I have half a dozen nice ash trees picked out for chemical injections to preserve them, which won't be cheap. The ash trees already having other issues are a lost cause and will be firewood or lumber soon unfortunately. Getting seedlings established now around mature ash in the forests is the best way to buy some time to hopefully find a long term solution. If no young seedlings are established while the mature seed sources are still around, those genetics are lost and there's more of a bottleneck for the species to cope with. Seedlings can take limited shade for a few years but need to be released to get sunlight eventually. Suppressing them in shade for a while buys a few years time that they won't be growing quickly. There is some promising research with some parasitoids but it will take years for this to work out to where ash can exist in the forests again even as a much less abundant tree.
https://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/disturbanc...gical_control/
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Old Yesterday, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Floribama
13,904 posts, read 29,984,649 times
Reputation: 12452
Quote:
Originally Posted by arctichomesteader View Post
I hoped that myself but areas that saw the earliest wave of EAB are having new outbreaks as the previously immature ash matures enough to be attractive to them and as survivors get hit.

The EAB is about 10 miles from my own land. I have half a dozen nice ash trees picked out for chemical injections to preserve them, which won't be cheap. The ash trees already having other issues are a lost cause and will be firewood or lumber soon unfortunately. Getting seedlings established now around mature ash in the forests is the best way to buy some time to hopefully find a long term solution. If no young seedlings are established while the mature seed sources are still around, those genetics are lost and there's more of a bottleneck for the species to cope with. Seedlings can take limited shade for a few years but need to be released to get sunlight eventually. Suppressing them in shade for a while buys a few years time that they won't be growing quickly. There is some promising research with some parasitoids but it will take years for this to work out to where ash can exist in the forests again even as a much less abundant tree.
https://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/disturbanc...gical_control/
Itís going to be interesting to see how EAB behaves when they make it to the South. Ash trees arenít terribly common down here except along rivers and swamps, so likely the borers will have to travel south along the rivers and creeks. I have read reports that they can survive in other members of the olive family, and we have LOTS of invasive Ligustrum down here, in addition to native Fringe trees. If they can help control Ligustrum then that would actually be a benefit down here.
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Old Today, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
25,240 posts, read 60,562,512 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arctichomesteader View Post
You're lucky you don't have a bunch of moose though. Nothing keeps moose out but I put fence cages about 5 feet tall (higher if you can is even better) around my planted trees like this picture shows to keep the deer out of them. 3 t-posts is stronger than 2 but I was short with 20 apples trees to plant last spring. 3-4 feet in diameter for the fencing works good. Don't underestimate the damage rabbits and small rodents can do as well.

The soil will take work. I have rocky soil which is sandy loam but a periodic high water table in spots as well, so a different problem. After a few years I've discovered some parts of my land will never be a fruit orchard, but some parts are wonderful.
I think you have lazy deer. We have those as well. The deer know if they push against them often and hard enough, they will eventually get to the delicious tree. The pear tree has four posts and a much wider circle than normal. I am hoping that will work. It is on its second or third year.

What often kills them is root rot. You can dig out a very large area of clay and replace it with better soil, but you have still created a bathtub where water will collect and just sit. I put 18" of pea gravel below the pear tree but that is not likely to be enough. We get an immense amount of water on the ground and it either runs off or finds a place to collect and sit there.

I think that is why the will does so well. It is always saturated during the spring and early summer as well as most of the fall and some of the winter. Especially now that the winters are warmer.
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Old Today, 09:08 AM
 
Location: The Woods
16,595 posts, read 21,722,960 times
Reputation: 8650
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
I think you have lazy deer. We have those as well. The deer know if they push against them often and hard enough, they will eventually get to the delicious tree. The pear tree has four posts and a much wider circle than normal. I am hoping that will work. It is on its second or third year.

What often kills them is root rot. You can dig out a very large area of clay and replace it with better soil, but you have still created a bathtub where water will collect and just sit. I put 18" of pea gravel below the pear tree but that is not likely to be enough. We get an immense amount of water on the ground and it either runs off or finds a place to collect and sit there.

I think that is why the will does so well. It is always saturated during the spring and early summer as well as most of the fall and some of the winter. Especially now that the winters are warmer.
I'm glad now my deer aren't as persistent as yours. Might be worth trying guy wires from each post outwards to some deeply driven stakes (try threaded rod with nuts and washers on top, they grip good in the ground).

Thinking about that wet soil, I think mounds are worth a try. Get about a foot high off the ground, 5 or more feet in diameter, with good soil. I looked into this when I found a spot I cleared for apple trees had a high water table despite a sandy soil with gravel under it. Ultimately, I have enough good ground I didn't bother, but it may be your only practical option.
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