U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old Yesterday, 07:39 PM
 
5,436 posts, read 1,551,967 times
Reputation: 5404

Advertisements

A lot of buzz on this - no pun intended - with people chiming in about their own garden experiences.


The Insect Apocalypse Is Here
By Brooke Jarvis

In the United States, scientists recently found the population of monarch butterflies fell by 90 percent in the last 20 years, a loss of 900 million individuals; the rusty-patched bumblebee, which once lived in 28 states, dropped by 87 percent over the same period. With other, less-studied insect species, one butterfly researcher told me, “all we can do is wave our arms and say, ‘It’s not here anymore!’ ” Still, the most disquieting thing wasn’t the disappearance of certain species of insects; it was the deeper worry, shared by Riis and many others, that a whole insect world might be quietly going missing, a loss of abundance that could alter the planet in unknowable ways.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/27/magazine/insect-apocalypse.html
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old Today, 07:14 AM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
2,046 posts, read 737,620 times
Reputation: 4163
I'm relieved to see that that has appeared in the NYT-- that means it's almost certainly not true.


Several poorly done studies have been published in recent years warning of falling insect populations. The studies are so poorly done that I'm not sure it's true or not....Invariably these studies claim GW must be the reason-- without even considering the obvious loss of habitat or light pollution (disrupts mating behavior) as more likely causes.


We blame ourselves here in The States for the fall in Monarch numbers-- but for the wrong reason- it's not our lack of milkweed plants here, it's our new found love of avocado dip. To supply our need for that, Mexicans are deforesting the relatively small Central American habitat required for the bugs' winter home, and replacing it with avocado trees. https://www.treehugger.com/green-foo...archs-too.html


Insects are terribly important to the web of life. We always joke about "why did Noah have to take those two mosquitoes along?" but without mosquito larvae for food, there'd be a lot of pretty skinny frogs, salamanders & minnows in our ponds.


BTW- which came first, the flowering plants or the insect pollinators?


In the US, we turn 1500 sq mi each year into buildings & parking lots as our urbans continue to sprawl. There's certainly extirpation (local extinction) of species going on as we develop natural habitat for human use.


Is there a simple solution to this complex problem?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 07:29 AM
 
9,856 posts, read 7,659,760 times
Reputation: 24141
So if something doesn't come from a right wing news source, it's automatically not true? Sigh.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Maryland
1,079 posts, read 320,887 times
Reputation: 2400
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
So if something doesn't come from a right wing news source, it's automatically not true? Sigh.
No, it should probably come directly from whatever source is referenced. The press rarely understands scientific studies adequately enough to explain them well. They often run with some headline as if it’s some revelation when instead the actual journal article, if there was one, is usually one of much more cautious statements. I didn’t read this particular one so I don’t know but I do not trust the general press (right, middle or left) to accurately report much of anything highly technical or scientific.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 11:23 AM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
2,046 posts, read 737,620 times
Reputation: 4163
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
So if something doesn't come from a right wing news source, it's automatically not true? Sigh.
So I present a concise critique of the piece, then state four points of fact pertinent to the subject and ask an important question, and all you think is important is that I find the NYT unreliable?


Deep thinking. Keep up the good work.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 12:12 PM
 
2,845 posts, read 1,068,982 times
Reputation: 5485
I'm not going to argue science or journalism, but the core idea of the article is very chilling. I don't need a scientific study to tell me there are fewer insects than when I was a child. Fewer whales, smaller fish, tiny and desperate populations of large mammals.

Thanks for the link, OP.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 01:31 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
6,361 posts, read 6,022,228 times
Reputation: 11520
It's six of one and half a dozen of the other. On the other side of the coin, with warming temperatures (at least in the northern hemisphere for sure) there's the increase of other types of insects like bark beetles and emerald ash borers for example, which are becoming more active and more able to reproduce and faster to spread through temperate regions decimating swaths of trees as they advance. Then there's the introduced species of insects which are flourishing and pushing out the native species, like Asian ladybugs for example. The list goes on, all thanks to the evolution and devolution of insects, many with a helping hand from humanity.

Quote:


BTW- which came first, the flowering plants or the insect pollinators?
I haven't researched it but I'm pretty sure it was the flowering plants came first before the pollinators. Plants were here first to start with anyway, before other living things came into existence. Flowering plants came along evolving their own methods of self-pollination and pollination by wind and by other mechanisms the plants created for themselves and for other plants so that the plants worked together cooperatively and sometimes symbiotically. Pollinators are opportunistic, but so are plants. Pollinating insects came along later after the plants offered them an opportunity they could take advantage of. Then plants evolved to further take advantage of the pollinating opportunity insects offered by enticing the insects with more attractants.

.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top