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Old 01-09-2019, 01:03 PM
B87 B87 started this thread
 
Location: Norwich, UK
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Any help identifying that tree from the street view image?



https://goo.gl/maps/NnUWpJdf1Rk



Saw this picture on twitter which also hints at the location being in that general area. Wondered if the street view pic is an avocado or something else?
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Old 01-09-2019, 11:10 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...
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Looks to be an 'avocado' variety.

https://www.google.com/search?biw=91...30.HHQzDK6Jo8w
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Old 01-10-2019, 12:02 AM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
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The street view is London and I wouldn't expect any avocados to survive outside in London.
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Old 01-10-2019, 12:07 AM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
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I take it back. According to this article, they can be grown in Southern England, but you wouldn't see much fruit, apparently:

Growing Avocados

I can't zoom in to the street view pic, so it's too hard for me to tell if it's an avocado.
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Old 01-10-2019, 12:54 AM
Status: "I am proud to shut down the government" (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Old Hippie Heaven
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
I take it back. According to this article, they can be grown in Southern England, but you wouldn't see much fruit, apparently:

Growing Avocados

I can't zoom in to the street view pic, so it's too hard for me to tell if it's an avocado.
If you look right in the center of the pic, there are several things there that darn sure look like avocados.

I'm having a hard time believing it myself, but...

Those leaves don't look like any of the avocado leaves I grew up with in SoCal. Those leaves were huge.
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Old 01-10-2019, 04:12 AM
B87 B87 started this thread
 
Location: Norwich, UK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
The street view is London and I wouldn't expect any avocados to survive outside in London.
Apparently avocados can survive temperatures down to 20F, and it doesn't get that cold in central London.
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Old 01-10-2019, 11:32 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
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Quote:
Originally Posted by B87 View Post
Apparently avocados can survive temperatures down to 20F, and it doesn't get that cold in central London.
Interesting. But, I guess I'd ask, what is the point of growing an avocado tree somewhere where you probably won't ever get to eat an avocado off of it?

Now, if you had a greenhouse, great. You might have more luck. But, you'd probably still have to add grow lights to actually get a decent yield of fruit.

I have learned that you're really best off to grow things suited to where you are. And even if you are willing to provide grow lights, you need to really understand the needs of the plants.

For instance, I have some indoor grow lights over some basil and cilantro in a spare room. They do great. I have learned, though, that with the cheap grow lights I have, growing any kind of plant that requires more sunlight (like anything that would produce fruit such as tomatoes or peppers), needs a much more expensive lighting system than I am willing to invest in.

You can grow anything anywhere - as long as you can give it what it needs.

You might keep something alive, but to get it to thrive might take a lot of effort and investment in equipment, greenhouse, etc.
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Old Yesterday, 05:07 AM
B87 B87 started this thread
 
Location: Norwich, UK
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That twitter pic does seem like it has a decent amount of fruit on though. It was taken in October 2015, and that year had a below average summer.
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Old Yesterday, 05:33 AM
 
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We have the same kind in FL.
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Old Yesterday, 09:01 AM
 
Location: The Woods
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
Interesting. But, I guess I'd ask, what is the point of growing an avocado tree somewhere where you probably won't ever get to eat an avocado off of it?

Now, if you had a greenhouse, great. You might have more luck. But, you'd probably still have to add grow lights to actually get a decent yield of fruit.

I have learned that you're really best off to grow things suited to where you are. And even if you are willing to provide grow lights, you need to really understand the needs of the plants.

For instance, I have some indoor grow lights over some basil and cilantro in a spare room. They do great. I have learned, though, that with the cheap grow lights I have, growing any kind of plant that requires more sunlight (like anything that would produce fruit such as tomatoes or peppers), needs a much more expensive lighting system than I am willing to invest in.

You can grow anything anywhere - as long as you can give it what it needs.

You might keep something alive, but to get it to thrive might take a lot of effort and investment in equipment, greenhouse, etc.
It's a fun challenge sometimes. Peaches can sort of be grown at my place, for example, but when a bad winter hits there can be big losses. Crops are unpredictable. Peach trees even in areas that they grow well are problematic, short-lived, and prone to just dying suddenly. It hit 35 below last winter which killed a bunch of the peach trees, but one of the survivors still put out a small peach crop and they were delicious. I've been playing with pawpaws too but the jury is still out on that one. Most of my orchard is apples, pears, plums, and cherries which are known to thrive in my area.
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