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Old 01-30-2019, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
2,425 posts, read 1,640,481 times
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Just curious, how many of you make your own potting mix? After not having great results with store-bought bags of the stuff, I've been making my own.

I usually use 1/2 (by volume) peat moss, then 1/4 (by volume) perlite, and maybe 1/4 soil (but my soil here isn't very good.) Additionally, I add a teaspoon of Micromax micronutrients, and some gypsum and a bit of epsom salts.

Anyone else have a good recipe? The amount of peat moss can be reduced if you substitute some of it with ground pine bark (more porous, faster draining.)

The main problem with this soil-less recipe is that it's not very heavy, so potted plants can blow over in a gust of wind.
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Old 01-30-2019, 12:01 PM
 
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I primarily use coco coir most times.
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Old 01-31-2019, 10:35 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,287 posts, read 48,476,620 times
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I have access to a lot of aged horse manure.

I use:
1/2 horse manure,
1/4 sand,
1/4 peat,
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Old 01-31-2019, 10:57 AM
 
11,672 posts, read 17,169,005 times
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1/3 peat moss, 1/3 perlite, 1/3 wood chips with some variations here and there. Sometimes substitute gravel for the wood chips or just add them.

The goal is to make it more drainable.
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Old 01-31-2019, 11:06 AM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
2,428 posts, read 844,246 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DougStark View Post
….. ground pine bark...
\.

Pine contains resins that inhibit plant growth, not to mention bacterial & fungal growth...Are you having success with that included? I'm curious.


I agree horse manure is great stuff. Aged more than 3 or 4 weeks, it has good nutrient content and great fibrous qualities that makes water & nutrients most available to roots. I use it straight for all my indoor seed starts....If you don't have your own on-site production system, it's usually available free for the taking at a local stable....just bring a shovel and a few buckets or empty dog/cat food bags....If you dig it out of the inner part of the pile, any stray weed seeds are usually burned up (amazingly hot in there-- a good place to dispose of a difficult to hide corpse, should the need ever arise )
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Old 01-31-2019, 12:37 PM
 
10,844 posts, read 9,843,683 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
I primarily use coco coir most times.
So interesting. I was watching a youtube video last night about container gardening and the soil mix contained coco coir. After I read what it does, I was impressed and thinking I will use it when I get ready to plant. Anything to retain moisture in this hot dry summer heat.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
I have access to a lot of aged horse manure.

I use:
1/2 horse manure,
1/4 sand,
1/4 peat,
I can vouch for horse manure. Many years ago in another life, we used an old horse corral to grow a garden. Talk about a bounty! The red onions were the size of a personal watermelon. Potatoes so large, you could feed two or three people from one potato. Everything grew like crazy and really delicious. Can't say enough good things about horse manure.
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Old 01-31-2019, 12:45 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
14,045 posts, read 11,179,349 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guidoLaMoto View Post
Pine contains resins that inhibit plant growth, not to mention bacterial & fungal growth...Are you having success with that included? I'm curious.


I agree horse manure is great stuff. Aged more than 3 or 4 weeks, it has good nutrient content and great fibrous qualities that makes water & nutrients most available to roots. I use it straight for all my indoor seed starts....If you don't have your own on-site production system, it's usually available free for the taking at a local stable....just bring a shovel and a few buckets or empty dog/cat food bags....If you dig it out of the inner part of the pile, any stray weed seeds are usually burned up (amazingly hot in there-- a good place to dispose of a difficult to hide corpse, should the need ever arise )
If you use horse manure fresh you get many weeds. I never heard of just 3 to 4 weeks to compost. I was always told to leave it compost for a year. So you have good luck with the shorter compost times without getting weeds? My grandmother always preferred cow manure.

I have a little more than a tri-axel of composted straw (from duck bedding) and leaves that I plan on making a new raised bed garden out of this Spring. I have been adding lime and fertilizer to the pile for the last few years. It also makes great potting soil.
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Old 01-31-2019, 12:54 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
21,609 posts, read 27,120,720 times
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For my expensive plants, equal parts turface, small bark chunks, small size chicken grit. For good drainage, but it is really heavy and rather expensive..

For starting seeds, sterilized sand, vermiculite. Depending on the type of seed, maybe enclose in a plastic bag. Peppers get started on blotter paper on top of the water heater.

For annual plants that aren't terribly expensive, sterilized soil, Perlite, maybe some shredded bark.

I don't like to use peat moss. It gets too wet and when it gets dry it is difficult to re-wet it.

If I can get well aged horse manure, I turn that under in my garden. It's the best.
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Old 01-31-2019, 02:51 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,287 posts, read 48,476,620 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guidoLaMoto View Post
... I agree horse manure is great stuff. Aged more than 3 or 4 weeks, it has good nutrient content and great fibrous qualities that makes water & nutrients most available to roots. I use it straight for all my indoor seed starts....If you don't have your own on-site production system, it's usually available free for the taking at a local stable....just bring a shovel and a few buckets or empty dog/cat food bags....If you dig it out of the inner part of the pile, any stray weed seeds are usually burned up (amazingly hot in there-- a good place to dispose of a difficult to hide corpse, should the need ever arise )
One of our neighbors' boards horses and they compete in trail-riding competitions. They give me 30 to 35 yards of horse manure each year.


Sphagnum moss grows bountifully around here, so I can harvest local peat without much difficulty.
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Old 01-31-2019, 03:03 PM
 
1,705 posts, read 841,998 times
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I use 1/3 sand, 1/3 peat moss, 1/3 manure and/or leaf mold.
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