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Old Today, 08:02 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
7,867 posts, read 5,844,500 times
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So the local store had their Spring Special of plants for sale. $17/flat of 6 packed vegetables was too hard to pass up.

"Now look what you've done!"

In an effort to save some time and expense, I was thinking of trying the deep mulch method. I have a LOT of leaf mulch and a fair amount of it has been in my chicken run so its somewhat composted as well. The current plan is to mow the prospective garden area that I'm expanding, spread the mulch, and plant. I've got 6 each Cayenne Peppers, Bell Peppers, Burpless Bush Cucumbers, Yellow Squash, Sweet Million Tomatoes, German Johnson Tomatoes, Cabbage, and Ichiban Egglplant.

I'm thinking of putting the eggplants in a wood box I bought since Eggplants need both heat and are sensitive to disease.

But with the rest, rather than till the entire area up, and rather than buy topsoil for the entire area, I was planning on mowing it super low, planting the started plant in a hole with some potting soil mixed in, and covering the whole of the area with a nice layer of leaf mulch. Anyone have any thoughts or experience with it?
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Old Today, 11:35 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
68,071 posts, read 50,147,809 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOV View Post
But with the rest, rather than till the entire area up, and rather than buy topsoil for the entire area, I was planning on mowing it super low, planting the started plant in a hole with some potting soil mixed in, and covering the whole of the area with a nice layer of leaf mulch. Anyone have any thoughts or experience with it?
Cardboard. Mow low first without ruining your lawnmower. Adding cardboard down first is a must! Take any plastic or tape or labels off first. Then add your mulch. Composted leaves and chicken poop is awesome. Enjoy.


You'll obviously have to cut a hole in the cardboard to plant your stuff but you'll enjoy the benefits of the cardboard.


In fact, maybe dig all the holes for the plants first, then add the cardboard. Probably be easier for planting time. Just remember where the holes were
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Old Today, 12:13 PM
 
1,903 posts, read 934,039 times
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I've done this many times in weedy areas, but not in grassy areas. It works fine. I'd lay down cardboard first, rather than newspaper. When I used newspaper, some of it eventually worked it's way to the top and looked messy. Cardboard stays put.


Tilling and weeding is a waste of my time, deep mulching is much easier for me.
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Old Today, 01:07 PM
 
Location: Was Midvalley Oregon; Now Eastside Seattle area
3,685 posts, read 1,694,106 times
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Lots of bugs and slugs in uncompost ed leaf mulch.
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