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Old 04-26-2019, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
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The photos are from the 90s in my old house when I used to live in West Asia (photos are not the best of quality, but it's all that I have). They could be two similar-ish plants potted in the same bed. So I am not too sure.

Spoiler




Any ideas? Thanks.

My initial thoughts were Ficus Pumila, but something was off.
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Old 11-22-2019, 03:21 AM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
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7 month later bump.

Any ideas? Really desperate to know.
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Old 11-22-2019, 12:10 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ~🌄 ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️🌄~
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The pictures are old and terribly grainy but I think you are right in your original thoughts about it. The stems do fit the upright profile of creeping fig (ficus pumila) and from what I can see of the leaves through the graininess the leaves look like the right shape and spacing on stems for it.
.
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Old 11-22-2019, 03:51 PM
 
Location: Old Hippie Heaven
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Those are very poor pictures.

And I know next to nothing about plants that grow in West Asia, some of which could well resemble F. pumila.

That said, I agree that F. pumila is a reasonable guess.

But it IS a guess.
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Old 11-22-2019, 04:09 PM
 
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I'm so curious!

Why are you "really desperate to know"?
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Old 11-22-2019, 04:27 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
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Does it have thorns? Is the underside of the leaf a silvery color?

https://plants.ces.ncsu.edu/plants/elaeagnus-pungens/
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Old Yesterday, 03:37 AM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ClaraC View Post
I'm so curious!

Why are you "really desperate to know"?
That was a hyperbole. But you can say it's my nostalgia talking.

Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
Does it have thorns? Is the underside of the leaf a silvery color?

https://plants.ces.ncsu.edu/plants/elaeagnus-pungens/
I really have no idea. I was a kid at around that time. All I know, from pics, that it's a plant with dark green, thick leaves and it seems to creep.

Thanks for the suggestion up there, Suzy. I really don't see that much of a resemblance. Maybe it really is Ficus Pumila after all. Though this photo is in Amman Jordan, a cool semi arid climate with very low humidity in the summer and frosty winters. And the plant was in our backyard. Would it have survived in those conditions? We didn't always water or fend for the bedded plants.
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Old Yesterday, 03:35 PM
 
Location: Old Hippie Heaven
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethereal View Post
That was a hyperbole. But you can say it's my nostalgia talking.


I really have no idea. I was a kid at around that time. All I know, from pics, that it's a plant with dark green, thick leaves and it seems to creep.

Thanks for the suggestion up there, Suzy. I really don't see that much of a resemblance. Maybe it really is Ficus Pumila after all. Though this photo is in Amman Jordan, a cool semi arid climate with very low humidity in the summer and frosty winters. And the plant was in our backyard. Would it have survived in those conditions? We didn't always water or fend for the bedded plants.
F. pumila doesn't have especially thick leaves, so...

F. pumila grows outside in So California, where it frosts several times a winter. People plant it against buildings and it does fine. Might die back a bit in a real cold snap. I particularly remember it growing in Disneyland. I wouldn't plant it where it gets direct sun, however, it wants some protection - light shade would be best, I think. I grow my potted F. pumila outside in the shade here in the PNW, keeping it inside from sometime in October to around April. But a plant in the ground has a lot more root protection than one in a pot.

Why not just try it? It's not an expensive plant to buy. And if it isn't the plant you remember, it does resemble it.
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Old Yesterday, 04:04 PM
 
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Is it edible?

The growth form looks like Malabar Spinach.


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Old Today, 03:49 AM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jacqueg View Post
F. pumila doesn't have especially thick leaves, so...

F. pumila grows outside in So California, where it frosts several times a winter. People plant it against buildings and it does fine. Might die back a bit in a real cold snap. I particularly remember it growing in Disneyland. I wouldn't plant it where it gets direct sun, however, it wants some protection - light shade would be best, I think. I grow my potted F. pumila outside in the shade here in the PNW, keeping it inside from sometime in October to around April. But a plant in the ground has a lot more root protection than one in a pot.

Why not just try it? It's not an expensive plant to buy. And if it isn't the plant you remember, it does resemble it.
Funny you ask. I've tried it two times within the past year. Both specimens died on me. And, mind you, I have a lot of plants in my backyard and they thrive and do well. I just think F. Pumilas have never liked me.

Nah, but really, I placed both plants in a east-facing, shaded veranda that gets some morning sun. The first one that died was in a hanging pot and I assumed dry winds may have killed it -- I had that one for 6-7 months. I purchased another and kept it on the ground in a pot (for protection), near other potted plants, in the veranda, and it died like 3 weeks later. I watered them a few times a week, as I usually do with all my plants.

Interestingly, both had very, dry leaves when they were dead. They died in autumn and spring, respectively. And it was a pretty sudden death, if that makes sense. One day, they were green and healthy, the next they're brown and 'crunchy'. Not sure what I was doing wrong.

Quote:
Originally Posted by orbiter View Post
Is it edible?

The growth form looks like Malabar Spinach.


Hm, this one got me thinking. For one, it does resemble them. And also, people in the Middle East/Mediterranean generally tend to grow edible plants in their yards.

I'll read about more about that one. And I would ask my family if we have edible plants in our home, but they never mentioned such thing.
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