U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-03-2019, 01:59 PM
 
285 posts, read 573,341 times
Reputation: 194

Advertisements

Hi - hoping someone can help me answer this. I had 25 arborvitae planted in my backyard for a natural fench. They were 7-8 footers, and I got them from a very reputable local nursery. They were planted by my landscaper in mid September (I live in southern NY state).

Around 2 weeks after planting, they already started to turn brown in a lot of spots. My landscaper is saying this was either from overwatering, or from my lawn sprinklers hitting the plants and causing them to burn. My sprinkler guy doesn't think this is from overwatering, and he says they will come back and be perfect in the spring.

I'm not sure what's going on here, but I spent a ton of money on these and am hoping they don't die before the first year even passes!

I did water them a lot by hand the first week - I thought they needed a ton of water right after transplanting. Could the browning be from that? Or could it also just be shock from the transplanting? Any other ideas of what this could be or what I can do to save these?

Thanks!







Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-03-2019, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Southern Most New Jersey
1,365 posts, read 921,736 times
Reputation: 2424
Do you run sprinklers every day.

How long do you run sprinklers.

What time of day do you run sprinklers.

When you watered them by hand did you just water the root areas with a watering wand or did you water leaves as well. What time of day.

Is there brown patch just in the front near sprinkler blast or all around shrub.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-03-2019, 02:12 PM
 
285 posts, read 573,341 times
Reputation: 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBoy3 View Post
Do you run sprinklers every day.

How long do you run sprinklers.

What time of day do you run sprinklers.

When you watered them by hand did you just water the root areas with a watering wand or did you water leaves as well. What time of day.

Is there brown patch just in the front near sprinkler blast or all around shrub.
Thanks - I was watering every day then because I had also planted grass seed around that time. I was actually running them twice a day, once in the morning before sunrise, and once in late afternoon/eve, for the grasses sake.

The sprinklers were touching the lower leaves a bit of the trees. On top of that, I was giving a good solid watering to these trees for a week after planting - only at the root areas with a wand. Did not touch the leaves then.

The backs do a look a bit better I will say, but not great. Again, I'm not sure if maybe this is just normal behavior after transplanting.

Last edited by hominamad; 11-03-2019 at 02:25 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-03-2019, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Former LI'er Now Rehoboth Beach, DE
8,213 posts, read 11,008,179 times
Reputation: 8535
Do you see any evidence of bagworms? More than likely it is transplant shock and you will be fine. But I would look into the sprinklers and keep the water on the ground if possible.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-03-2019, 06:45 PM
 
Location: Southern Most New Jersey
1,365 posts, read 921,736 times
Reputation: 2424
As nuts infers there can be a lot of things going on here. And you have a lot invested.

I would call your local extension agent and ask them for suggestions. Hopefully you can email them a photo. It has been my experience there can be certain issues unique to a geographical area. The extension service can help with this.

I would also ask landscaper for name and phone number of grower and call them.

Cornell Extension in your state has a fact sheet on this topic but it is almost 20 years old. Below -

http://ccenassau.org/resources/arborvitae-problems

By now I am sure your sprinklers are drained for the winter. I never run sprinklers late day as I want plants/grass dry for the night. But I would still keep studying. Even after this is over scout these plants regularly.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-03-2019, 08:45 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ~🌄 ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️🌄~
7,923 posts, read 6,970,456 times
Reputation: 15915
I think it's the sprinkler caused it. The browning on all of them equally goes up the front and then stops at basically the same height in a straight line across the whole row of trees, and the worst of the browning is on the front, it's not so bad on the sides. So that suggests to me that some water under pressure was repeatedly hitting all the foliage below a certain line of height where the browning stops at. Next year make sure the sprinkler's water pressure and height is adjusted so no water under pressure is hitting the foliage.
.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-04-2019, 07:12 AM
 
Location: NC
6,866 posts, read 8,451,474 times
Reputation: 14435
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
I think it's the sprinkler caused it. The browning on all of them equally goes up the front and then stops at basically the same height in a straight line across the whole row of trees, and the worst of the browning is on the front, it's not so bad on the sides. So that suggests to me that some water under pressure was repeatedly hitting all the foliage below a certain line of height where the browning stops at. Next year make sure the sprinkler's water pressure and height is adjusted so no water under pressure is hitting the foliage.
.
What is the problem/effect of the water hitting the foliage? Is it fungus? Scald? Just curious.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-04-2019, 08:32 AM
 
285 posts, read 573,341 times
Reputation: 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by luv4horses View Post
What is the problem/effect of the water hitting the foliage? Is it fungus? Scald? Just curious.
That was my question too. Sometimes it rains for 2-3 days straight - why doesn't that cause browning? Is it a combination of being wet and sunny at the same time?

I'm definitely going to make sure my sprinklers don't hit them come spring though, just to be safe. If this was from too much watering, do you think these can bounce back in the spring?

Thanks for all the tips!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-04-2019, 12:17 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ~🌄 ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️🌄~
7,923 posts, read 6,970,456 times
Reputation: 15915
Quote:
Originally Posted by luv4horses View Post
What is the problem/effect of the water hitting the foliage? Is it fungus? Scald? Just curious.
Quote:
Originally Posted by hominamad View Post
That was my question too. Sometimes it rains for 2-3 days straight - why doesn't that cause browning? Is it a combination of being wet and sunny at the same time?

I'm definitely going to make sure my sprinklers don't hit them come spring though, just to be safe. If this was from too much watering, do you think these can bounce back in the spring?

Thanks for all the tips!

The problem is the unnatural pressure, repetition and sideways direction that the water is coming from with sprinklers (especially horizontal sprinklers and with systems where water is being directed from below to above). The pressure of water hitting the leaves hard easily bruises, softens and loosens the leaves and stems and it also forces water up under the overlapping leaf scales where there is no water-repellant coating for protection deep under those scales. It may also peel some of the scales back and off (picture the tiles on a roof being peeled back and off the roof when under high wind and water pressure coming at it horizontally or from below). The leaf scales can't get rid of the water forced under them and thus the rot begins down under/between the scales. This high pressure doesn't happen with natural rain falling down from above even when it's raining for days or weeks without end, and the outside surface of the leaves has a natural repellant and shape to direct normal rain from above to run down and away from the overlaps.

Example picture below taken from this website: https://www.nature-microscope-photo-...e-leaf-5x.html


Last edited by Zoisite; 11-04-2019 at 12:34 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-04-2019, 12:29 PM
 
Location: NC
6,866 posts, read 8,451,474 times
Reputation: 14435
Thanks, Zoisite. So basically the cause is rot (fungal or bacterial) because the water gets to otherwise protected places. Knew you would have a good answer.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top