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Old Today, 11:57 AM
 
183 posts, read 65,334 times
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Thanks so from what you've seen you think I would need to excavate the wall and secure the pergola or do you think they may suggest the pergola come down as well? That would be terrible but worth it if it has to be done
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Old Today, 01:12 PM
 
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I was going to say Ted Bear's idea #9. After a sound retaining wall is in you may be able to put up wood beams for the natural look to cover the concrete if you like.

We have a very very small similar but decorative area. Very small so that we can just dig a bit and push the wood posts back in at a small natural area whenever we need to. We know about water, anything downhill, certain climates.

The deadman idea is great for getting serious.

Maybe check back here with your contractor's ideas.
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Old Today, 03:15 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cadsuper55 View Post
Great I really appreciate this information and will use it
One more thought which occurred to me after I posted my previous message. You might want to consider the use of some other material if/when you completely replace the wood wall. They look like railroad ties, by the way.

I had a similar but much smaller wall in my current home when I bought it. I really didn't like the looks of it, plus if it's RR ties, they've been heavily creosoted for preservation and give off a very unpleasant smell in warm weather. Anyway, I had mine removed and replaced them with stacked rock. Keystone bricks would work too. That way the water can drain between the rocks or bricks which helps to alleviate the pressure from the dirt and water. Similar, but more aesthetically pleasing, to the way rip-rap is used along waterways to keep the soil from eroding due to water intrusion.

I wasn't going to share this because I didn't want to sound negative but on second thought I think I will. The last thing you want is to have that hill start to slide. Years ago, my boss was suffocated in his bed when his backyard hillside came down, took out his bedroom wall and buried him. He did not survive. This was in Sherman Oaks, in L.A., during one of the occasional "monsoon" rains that SoCal can get. Think safety first.

I'll be interested to hear what the engineer has to say.
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Old Today, 03:39 PM
 
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Thanks and yes they are railroad ties. I can't wait to hear the report from the engineer to get this thing going. I appreciate the feedback
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Old Today, 06:19 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cadsuper55 View Post
Thanks and yes they are railroad ties. I can't wait to hear the report from the engineer to get this thing going. I appreciate the feedback
One thing your engineer might not see is how your railroad ties look when they are unearthed. Even the heavily creosoted railroad ties will eventually rot with age. That might or might not be the case; but you will not know until the rebuilding starts. Of course the older the ties are; the less smell from the creosote. But, unfortunately, the quicker they are to rot. In your pictures your ties look great; I just worry about what the other side looks like.

Besides the deadmans; it is also best if you can angle the retaining walls back against the slope. Here is an example on a smaller wall: https://www.instructables.com/id/How...etaining-Wall/.

You might also want to check out Pinterest for more ideas: https://www.pinterest.com/search/pin...yped&term_meta[]=sloped%7Ctyped&term_meta[]=railroad%7Ctyped&term_meta[]=tie%7Ctyped&term_meta[]=retaining%7Ctyped&term_meta[]=walls%7Ctyped
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Old Today, 07:40 PM
 
Location: CA, heading to AZ...
1,207 posts, read 191,306 times
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Originally Posted by Cadsuper55 View Post
Thank you
I will look into this I'm sure it's not there. Do you think there's a way to add this to the wall to secure it or it would still need other moving parts and repairs.?
You would need to remove the soil and redo it.....all of it......
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Old Today, 07:41 PM
 
Location: CA, heading to AZ...
1,207 posts, read 191,306 times
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Out here in CA, retaining walls cannot be built from railroad ties any longer. They do tend to fail a lot more than concrete or block walls.....
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