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Old 03-13-2021, 06:43 PM
 
7,419 posts, read 7,004,097 times
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One thing I have learned over the years it doesn’t always pay to buy cheap plants.

Found this channel which can be very helpful and here are the plants of the year.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BWPC-9_814A

Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
I have never had any, and I was going to buy some, but I couldn’t bring myself to pay $20. @
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Old 03-13-2021, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Canada
14,633 posts, read 14,720,940 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
I have never had any, and I was going to buy some, but I couldn’t bring myself to pay $20. @
Hellebores are worth the initial cost of them when you consider how hardy they are and they can start blooming in early December and continue growing and blooming for 4 or 5 months well into mid-spring. If they get covered with snow or frozen stiff during winter wind storms they just bounce right back as soon as the temperatures go up again and they put on an extra burst of growth. I have an established 4 year old pink helleborus in a raised bed and it was subjected to really ugly freezing polar winds and snowy weather in February this year and the whole thing completely toppled over as if the plant had melted. As soon as the temperatures came up again to normal winter temps 2 weeks later it plumped up and stood upright and re-doubled it's blooms. Even the blooms that had gotten frozen solid came right back. I've not seen it looking better and can't help wondering if maybe they thrive on getting the odd solid freeze from time to time.

$20 is not a bad price to pay if they were in 1 gallon pots or bigger. The two new ones that I recently picked up a couple of weeks ago were just babies, maybe 5 inches tall in 4 inch pots and they were $5.50 apiece. I put them in the ground last Tuesday and now 5 days later they are 8 or 9 inches tall. Fast enough growers, all they needed was room for the roots to spread out. By this time next year they should be around 20 inches tall or more.

Today when I stopped by the nursery the ones that are in 1 gallon pots were $20 each on special spring sale and the 2 gallons and over ones ranged between $30 to $100 depending on how big the plants and root systems are. Likewise with the peonies I was looking at today, they were in the same price ranges as the helleborus. I didn't get more peonies though, there's already 5 of them growing well established in the yard.

I'm debating going back tomorrow and getting a couple of Bleeding Hearts. The little ones in the 6 inch pots are $10 each. They are the kind that get to around 4 feet tall with a 5 foot span at maturity.

.
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Old 03-14-2021, 11:28 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
30,585 posts, read 24,913,792 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
Ha! We paid $30 ea. We bought 2. We hope to have them in the ground tomorrow.

Even buying from Bluestone, they are expensive.

We bought from a locally owned nursery.,
Got them in the ground about an hour before the rain commenced. They look kind of happy right now. But they were really root bound. Seeing that always worries me.
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Old 03-15-2021, 06:39 AM
 
4,086 posts, read 2,387,839 times
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Every year I place volunteer shrubs into containers and put them in the ground, what lives and what doesn't live doesn't matter, but what does survive is icing on the cake. Have a nice black butterfly cutting that is now growing which I turn into a standard hoping to get something like this:

https://www.gardengatemagazine.com/a...dlejastandard/
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Old 03-16-2021, 04:51 AM
 
7,419 posts, read 7,004,097 times
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Definitely agree on Hellebores. Nice bloom in the midst of late winter brings an encouraging sign to spring.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Hellebores are worth the initial cost of them when you consider how hardy they are and they can start blooming in early December and continue growing and blooming for 4 or 5 months well into mid-spring. If they get covered with snow or frozen stiff during winter wind storms they just bounce right back as soon as the temperatures go up again and they put on an extra burst of growth. I have an established 4 year old pink helleborus in a raised bed and it was subjected to really ugly freezing polar winds and snowy weather in February this year and the whole thing completely toppled over as if the plant had melted. As soon as the temperatures came up again to normal winter temps 2 weeks later it plumped up and stood upright and re-doubled it's blooms. Even the blooms that had gotten frozen solid came right back. I've not seen it looking better and can't help wondering if maybe they thrive on getting the odd solid freeze from time to time.

$20 is not a bad price to pay if they were in 1 gallon pots or bigger. The two new ones that I recently picked up a couple of weeks ago were just babies, maybe 5 inches tall in 4 inch pots and they were $5.50 apiece. I put them in the ground last Tuesday and now 5 days later they are 8 or 9 inches tall. Fast enough growers, all they needed was room for the roots to spread out. By this time next year they should be around 20 inches tall or more.

Today when I stopped by the nursery the ones that are in 1 gallon pots were $20 each on special spring sale and the 2 gallons and over ones ranged between $30 to $100 depending on how big the plants and root systems are. Likewise with the peonies I was looking at today, they were in the same price ranges as the helleborus. I didn't get more peonies though, there's already 5 of them growing well established in the yard.

I'm debating going back tomorrow and getting a couple of Bleeding Hearts. The little ones in the 6 inch pots are $10 each. They are the kind that get to around 4 feet tall with a 5 foot span at maturity.

.
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Old 03-16-2021, 12:57 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
32,479 posts, read 47,405,393 times
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I just bought two bare root fruit trees. Does that count?
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Old 03-17-2021, 05:39 PM
 
7,419 posts, read 7,004,097 times
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Sure why not.

Fertilized all my perennials this evening with Jobe’s Organics Annual & Perennials Granular Fertilizer.

Love that stuff. Reapply every 6 to 8 weeks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
I just bought two bare root fruit trees. Does that count?
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Old 03-17-2021, 06:09 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, 615' Elevation, Zone 8b - originally from SF Bay Area
44,061 posts, read 80,100,596 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
Ha! We paid $30 ea. We bought 2. We hope to have them in the ground tomorrow.

Even buying from Bluestone, they are expensive.

We bought from a locally owned nursery.,
I see you are in the southern part of the state, hopefully warmer? They like it to be above 40F at night. I would have to wait, we have been 28-32F the last few mornings with heavy frost.
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Old 03-18-2021, 11:41 AM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
30,585 posts, read 24,913,792 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
I see you are in the southern part of the state, hopefully warmer? They like it to be above 40F at night. I would have to wait, we have been 28-32F the last few mornings with heavy frost.
We had a hard freeze a night after we got them in the ground. They seem to have recovered after that.

I like planting smaller plants usually. But the smaller hellebore plants were all picked over when we went to buy.

These are really pretty plants.
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Old 03-18-2021, 05:48 PM
 
7,419 posts, read 7,004,097 times
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I have several of them already in the ground for a couple years now and temperatures have been some times in the low to mid 20s and they always bounce back with no problem. Very few other perennials can bloom this time of the year and show as well as they do in the midst of snow on the ground.

Trying to figure out if these do better with a light trimming in a few thousand after blooming in early spring to keep them tidy or if nothing else at least deadhead them?

Everyone that sees them is always asking what are they and how do they grow as they’re such a unique flowering item in the middle of March.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
I see you are in the southern part of the state, hopefully warmer? They like it to be above 40F at night. I would have to wait, we have been 28-32F the last few mornings with heavy frost.
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