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Old 07-13-2021, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
83,514 posts, read 75,294,816 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
It finished shedding the needles finally, hopefully won't have a massive amount come down in the Fall as I don't really see how that's possible- considering all the other pine trees nearby have lost a small fraction in the same time frame.
Mine hasn't finished but slowing down. I still see some on the deck after I swept yesterday but doesn't look like any left on the tree now. The thing grows so fast. I need to chop the top off again.
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Old 07-13-2021, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Minnesota
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
Mine hasn't finished but slowing down. I still see some on the deck after I swept yesterday but doesn't look like any left on the tree now. The thing grows so fast. I need to chop the top off again.
I didn't know you could chop of the top of a white pine and it would live. What does it do to it's growth pattern? Usually the lower branches die as they get taller on white pines. Are we talking about the same kind of tree?
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Old 07-14-2021, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Indiana Uplands
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
Mine hasn't finished but slowing down. I still see some on the deck after I swept yesterday but doesn't look like any left on the tree now. The thing grows so fast. I need to chop the top off again.
The pine tree shades a part of the roof keeping my energy bills low in the summer, although it is quite well trimmed, few branches overhang the roof of any size. However, it is getting close to 100 ft tall, planted by the original owners in 1979. Trees grow extremely fast here, consistent precipitation throughout the entire year, and very few periods of drought. There was one three year stretch several years ago with a cumulative total of 190 inches of precipitation.
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Old 07-14-2021, 04:14 PM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
However, it is getting close to 100 ft tall

I'm glad I chop mine off cause I know they can get that tall. And yeah, things grow fast around here too so its always a process to keep things pruned.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Izzie1213 View Post
I didn't know you could chop of the top of a white pine and it would live. What does it do to it's growth pattern? Usually the lower branches die as they get taller on white pines. Are we talking about the same kind of tree?

Yes, chopping the top sends energy to all the branches so it bushes out instead of grows tall. What ends up happening is a new shoot will form and just start getting taller from that. I've seen storms knock the tops off a Pines and they just keep growing





View from inside my Dining room. I pruned the lower branches because they get in the way from the lawn and seeing the lawn from the deck. Remaining lower branches never died but as they expand there is less growth near the trunk.




I chopped it off years ago where the red circle is and the lines. New growth is crazy. Just keeps growing





The shade this thing provides is awesome. Sucks in winter because it blocks the southern sun but every Summer reminds me why I should keep it. Also sucks that sap falls from it.





It's about 30 feet tall. Estimated. I wanna chop 12 feet off the top again.
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Old 07-30-2021, 05:13 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
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The Pine In The Pouring Rain. It was coming down in buckets


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Old 07-30-2021, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Indiana Uplands
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It isn't dropping needles now, last week used the jet spray on the garden hose to get the needles off the roof, haha.

I want to plant a Balsam Fir and White Birch this Autumn in my yard to complete the Northwoods look. (I'm at a Zone 5B plant hardiness but a micro-climate with far less summer heat than other areas at this elevation and latitude).

I already have plenty of Hemlock, Sugar Maple and White Pines around.
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Old 07-30-2021, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Western PA
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white pines are the rodents of trees. and you can light a wet one with a match. as soon as the rest of the trees are able to defend against the other rodent: the white tailed deer, down come the pines. got a friend with a mill and he makes siding out of them so they dont go to waste.
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Old 07-30-2021, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Indiana Uplands
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RetireinPA View Post
white pines are the rodents of trees. and you can light a wet one with a match. as soon as the rest of the trees are able to defend against the other rodent: the white tailed deer, down come the pines. got a friend with a mill and he makes siding out of them so they dont go to waste.
They were used for ship masts during the 19th century, lumber is more valuable than many other softwood trees. There is a forest in New Hampshire called the Mast Yard in Merrimack County, it is a managed woodlot.

"According to Bouton’s History of Concord, in the early 1800’s this area was famous for supplying trees, two to three feet in diameter, that were used as masts for “His Majesty’s Royal Ships” and later as masts for various other vessels built on the seacoast. The best masts were from the northwesterly side of Horse Hill. The trees were “drawn” to the Contoocook River to an area now called the “Mast Yard,” then floated down to the Merrimack River. Larger logs were drawn by 52 teams of oxen (104 animals) along Borough Road to the sandbanks below Sewalls Falls and there “thrown” into the Merrimack River and floated to the coast."

Last edited by GraniteStater; 07-30-2021 at 12:26 PM..
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Old 07-30-2021, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Western PA
10,846 posts, read 4,525,381 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
It shades my house and has been trimmed back over time, so there aren't very many larger branches that overhang the roof. I did get an estimate to trim it last year and they wanted $550, so I just did some pruning myself over the past winter and that helped a bit.
well I would be more worried about the tree itself other than limbs...they have a notoriously shallow root ball and if the ground is wet and a good wind comes along.. better safe than sorry. im removing a dozen as soon as we can get the neighbor friends mill moved.
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Old 07-30-2021, 01:59 PM
 
Location: Østenfor sol og vestenfor måne
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White Pine is one of the chief keystone species of the old growth and mature second growth in Northeastern forest ecoregions including the Northeastern Coastal forests, the New England-Acadian forests which cover most of northern and inland New England, and to the west, the ecoregions of the Allegheny Highlands forests and the Appalachian-Blue Ridge forests of the Appalachian Mountains.

Its extirpation causes a collapse of the natural ecosystem and the complex web of natural habitats of the flora and fauna covering of a vast region of the continent.

For this reason, I shudder to hear it referred to as a "rodent" species. That is not to say that it is sacrosanct in the garden. By all means if one presents a danger to housing or otherwise disrupts a garden or farm plan, cut it. But denigrating the species is a bit over the top.
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