U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-02-2021, 01:47 PM
 
1,863 posts, read 1,471,093 times
Reputation: 1925

Advertisements

Where I live at the local power company cut down my huge maple tree. In the woods close by there are several that I am thinking about digging up and planting them on my lot. They are both about 6' tall and 3/4" in diameter. One has a vertical split about a .5" and the other had a limb broke off at some point.
Would these heal themselves if I transplant them next month? I am planning on digging the hole that it will go in twice as big as the root ball I dig up. What type of soil and fertilizer should I put in the hole? The leaves have not fell off yet, but they have changed color.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-02-2021, 02:41 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
39,531 posts, read 70,967,496 times
Reputation: 47992
What variety of Maple? Here we have native Big Leaf Maples and Vine Maples, both are easily transplanted while dormant from now until the buds begin to swell about March. They, and also Japanese Maples like fine to medium soil, not sandy or rocky, and need good drainage. Be sure to water regularly once spring comes if you don't get rain.

As for the wounds, a split can attract disease and pests, watch it closely to see that it heals by this time next year and keep it clean. A broken limb need to have a clean cut made to eliminate the jagged edges. Most likely new growth will sprout from below the cut and a new branch will replace it in a few years.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2021, 03:55 PM
 
1,863 posts, read 1,471,093 times
Reputation: 1925
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
What variety of Maple? Here we have native Big Leaf Maples and Vine Maples, both are easily transplanted while dormant from now until the buds begin to swell about March. They, and also Japanese Maples like fine to medium soil, not sandy or rocky, and need good drainage. Be sure to water regularly once spring comes if you don't get rain.

As for the wounds, a split can attract disease and pests, watch it closely to see that it heals by this time next year and keep it clean. A broken limb need to have a clean cut made to eliminate the jagged edges. Most likely new growth will sprout from below the cut and a new branch will replace it in a few years.
I don't know for sure, but looking a maple tree leaves on the internet it may be a hard maple. I can look at the leaf better once it quits raining.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-03-2021, 03:09 AM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
6,043 posts, read 3,249,060 times
Reputation: 14626
a) Wait until it's good and dormant, as late in the year as you can before the soil freezes and you can't dig.

2) Maples are more like weeds-- the wounds shouldn't make much difference.

C] Remember the roots below the soil surface are as big as the tree above the surface-- Get as big a root ball as you can (it's gunna be heavy-- Can you lift it without hurtng yourself?)

d) Maples are more like weeds. The difference between a 3 footer and a 6 footer is problably only one year of growth. Can you find smaller ones to transplant?-- smaller root ball needed, but a bigger percentage of the whole root ball; better chance of survival. Ten yrs ftrom now, you wouldn't know the difference.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-03-2021, 03:26 AM
 
1,863 posts, read 1,471,093 times
Reputation: 1925
Quote:
Originally Posted by guidoLaMoto View Post
a) Wait until it's good and dormant, as late in the year as you can before the soil freezes and you can't dig.

2) Maples are more like weeds-- the wounds shouldn't make much difference.

C] Remember the roots below the soil surface are as big as the tree above the surface-- Get as big a root ball as you can (it's gunna be heavy-- Can you lift it without hurtng yourself?)

d) Maples are more like weeds. The difference between a 3 footer and a 6 footer is problably only one year of growth. Can you find smaller ones to transplant?-- smaller root ball needed, but a bigger percentage of the whole root ball; better chance of survival. Ten yrs ftrom now, you wouldn't know the difference.

Thanks - good info. I will look for a smaller tree.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-03-2021, 06:57 AM
 
Location: Virginia
8,975 posts, read 4,960,673 times
Reputation: 24606
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
What variety of Maple? Here we have native Big Leaf Maples and Vine Maples, both are easily transplanted while dormant from now until the buds begin to swell about March. They, and also Japanese Maples like fine to medium soil, not sandy or rocky, and need good drainage. Be sure to water regularly once spring comes if you don't get rain.

As for the wounds, a split can attract disease and pests, watch it closely to see that it heals by this time next year and keep it clean. A broken limb need to have a clean cut made to eliminate the jagged edges. Most likely new growth will sprout from below the cut and a new branch will replace it in a few years.
I definitely agree that you want to make sure what kind of maple tree it is first. If it was a Japanese Maple I'd think you'd already know, as they're so distinctive. Be very sure it's not a Silver Maple, as they have shorter life spans and are much more prone to limb breakage in high winds. They were frequently planted for their nice foliage, but spread easily and became too common after awhile. A Scarlet maple or Sugar Maple would be nice though. Just remember that the majority of the roots are in the top 18 inches of the soil and extend out to the drip line, so you want to dig a much wider hole than a deeper one, and plant it the same way. (This is coming from my Tree Steward course, btw.)
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-03-2021, 09:37 AM
 
35,705 posts, read 41,874,296 times
Reputation: 52457
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bungalove View Post
I definitely agree that you want to make sure what kind of maple tree it is first. If it was a Japanese Maple I'd think you'd already know, as they're so distinctive. Be very sure it's not a Silver Maple, as they have shorter life spans and are much more prone to limb breakage in high winds. They were frequently planted for their nice foliage, but spread easily and became too common after awhile. A Scarlet maple or Sugar Maple would be nice though. Just remember that the majority of the roots are in the top 18 inches of the soil and extend out to the drip line, so you want to dig a much wider hole than a deeper one, and plant it the same way. (This is coming from my Tree Steward course, btw.)
Agree! You do not want a silver maple. Make sure what kind of maple it is before bothering with it.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-03-2021, 10:10 AM
 
Location: New England
2,116 posts, read 860,839 times
Reputation: 6000
I've transplanted more than a few maple trees in my days. It's mostly sugar maples up here. I like to dig about 10 inches deeper than I need to and throw a couple shovels of compost in, then dirt to bring the hole up to proper planting depth with a little bit of compost around the roots and top it off with more soil. I believe this gives the tree a chance to get used to it's new spot and start new roots gradually. Then in the year after the transplant, the new roots punch through the layer of soil and start feeding off the compost at the bottom of the hole. That's when I see the top growth take off and the tree reaches for the sky. I generally don't add fertilizer when transplanting becaues it could burn the roots. Once its in the ground, every year I put a ring of compost around the edges of the root ball. YMMV.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-03-2021, 10:22 AM
 
Location: In the Pearl of the Purchase, Ky
10,025 posts, read 15,725,350 times
Reputation: 40481
On my old job I've seen people dig up trees out of the woods and what was about to be bush hogged on the state right of way. Maples, dogwood and red bud, mainly. They took them home, buried the root wad and just watered them. No other special treatment and the trees did fine. Kept growing and covering the yard with leaves. lol

One man did say he sprayed them maybe a couple times with Miracle Gro.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-03-2021, 11:44 AM
 
1,863 posts, read 1,471,093 times
Reputation: 1925
Per a leaf id app it is a red maple.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2022, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top