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Old 02-13-2007, 09:19 PM
 
Location: WPB, FL. Dreaming of Oil city, PA
2,909 posts, read 12,790,503 times
Reputation: 991

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You are forgetting that global warming has caused the zones today to be 1-2 zones higher than 20 years ago. People are growing palm trees in Canada now! They use windmill palms and palmettos which are cold hardy to zero and sometimes as low as around -10! They may take minor damage at zero but rapidly recover in the spring. Oil city is zone 7a and does not get below -10 from what ive seen. In fact not every winter even gets below zero, therefore the average annual minimum is just under zero making it zone 7a. I read the blogs of gardening experts and they say at zone 7b you wont have any problems, at 7a your palms will suffer minor damage if you have an unusually cold winter. At zone 6a this is pushing it and you may lose some palms.



http://www.oakbaytourism.com/activities/land/palm_tree_capital.htm (broken link)

http://www.amazinggardens.com/john.html
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Old 02-14-2007, 04:26 AM
 
Location: PA
669 posts, read 2,903,601 times
Reputation: 278
Quote:
Originally Posted by Need_affordable_home View Post
You are forgetting that global warming has caused the zones today to be 1-2 zones higher than 20 years ago. People are growing palm trees in Canada now! They use windmill palms and palmettos which are cold hardy to zero and sometimes as low as around -10! They may take minor damage at zero but rapidly recover in the spring. Oil city is zone 7a and does not get below -10 from what ive seen.
Just because you haven't watched it go below -10 (I'm assuming you've only watched it during this overall mild winter) doesn't mean it doesn't.

I really question why you'd want palm trees up north. Why would you go through all the labor to keep them there? Wrapping them up and all that? Just stay in the South if you want palms IMO.
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Old 02-14-2007, 08:11 AM
 
Location: WPB, FL. Dreaming of Oil city, PA
2,909 posts, read 12,790,503 times
Reputation: 991
You dont have to do anything, just plant them in the ground and they will grow fine if it doesnt get extremely cold. See the links above
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Old 02-14-2007, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,595 posts, read 22,894,251 times
Reputation: 3478
Quote:
Originally Posted by Need_affordable_home View Post
You dont have to do anything, just plant them in the ground and they will grow fine if it doesnt get extremely cold. See the links above
It usually gets extremely cold up north, almost every winter.
Just like how it gets extremely hot in the south every summer.

I will check out those links though...
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Old 02-14-2007, 04:13 PM
 
Location: Sometimes Maryland, sometimes NoVA. Depends on the day of the week
1,501 posts, read 10,537,303 times
Reputation: 1091
Palm trees up north may not be a big issue, but sometimes trasporting plants from one region to another can be real issue. Non-native plants often become invasive.

For example, check out the invasive list for Virginia:http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/dnh/invlist.pdf (broken link) Some of those (like periwinkle and wisteria) are considered by some to be great landscaping plants. But once they get out, they can wreck havoc. There was a grove of trees in the woods behind my old house that was killed by wisteria English Ivy is another one that can be devestating. Oh, and being from Florida you are probably familiar with kudzu.

Learn to love the flora and fauna of your new area. If you want tropical plants, stay in the tropics or raise houseplants
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Old 02-14-2007, 11:12 PM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
9,324 posts, read 23,226,903 times
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I have a friend who lives near Minneapolis and has a tropical garden Of course that's in a greenhouse attatched to his home. He does have orchids which are hung outside in warm months then brought inside for the winter, and also grows bananas inside and plants some outside which only grow for a while and die in the cold weather, and never produce fruit. He had tried an experiment once, building a plastic dome over the banana patch and heating it, but that didn't work. You can do the greenhouse thing, but it's better to get used to the northern plant life instead of trying to recreate the Florida you grew up with and speculators drove you from. Northern trees are a lot more beautiful than stupid palm trees, most of which are not native to Florida anyway. Only true palmates like sabal palms and palmettos are native to Florida and grow as far north as the carolinas and in most southern states.
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Old 02-15-2007, 01:59 AM
 
Location: Richmond
1,489 posts, read 7,965,113 times
Reputation: 697
Quote:
Originally Posted by metaljaybird View Post
There are a couple potted palm trees outside a restaurant in Morristown, NJ. They look miserable. I wouldn't move palm trees north of the Carolinas.
Palm trees grow as far north as southeastern Virginia. They have palm trees in Va Beach. Richmond has a sub tropical zone climate, but I think most of the palm trees in Virginia grow in Hampton Roads area.

Richmond is zone 7, but VA Beach is zone 8.
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Old 02-26-2007, 02:10 AM
 
8 posts, read 65,469 times
Reputation: 15
Hey, well,yes the last few weeks we have had temp well below -15C - -20C, not including wind chills temps, but so far the coldest of all this year was -25C/-34C with the wind chill, and everything is still the same, and I just check out my canna's, on feb.23rd, and they are still alive and well,...........once I can get the pick off my cell, and i will take more pics in the spring, I will try to set up a website or something like that and update you guys for sure........thanks for your support on growing hardy palms....

Adam
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Old 02-26-2007, 04:42 AM
 
Location: Tampa Bay
1,020 posts, read 3,014,379 times
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You can grow some palm trees and plants in the north. Miami University in Oxford Ohio conducted a big study on it. Many people in southern Ohio are growing windmill palms and some smaller palms like needle palms. Typically anything that is native a palm to Oklahoma will grow in Ohio. You can also do small things like create micro-climates by using your house to subvert wind and create warmer pockets where less hardier palm plants can grow. Southern Ohio rarely gets to cold extremes and is considered to be a sub-tropical climate zone because warmer air feeds up the mountains and settles in the southern valley. It gets trapped in the foothill regions which is why there are some many rare plant species. You just have to prune them to try and stimulate new growth. I have even seen palms plants in the woods playing as a kid. Places in Ohio can actually like like you're in Cambodia or India or something between smaller forest floor shubbery palms, lots of vines, ancient rock formations, the humidity, and dense forest growth.
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Old 02-26-2007, 06:12 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,595 posts, read 22,894,251 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the_pines View Post
Typically anything that is native a palm to Oklahoma will grow in Ohio.
Oklahoma has native palms?!?

I didn't think any part of northern Texas has native palms.
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