U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-12-2007, 04:05 AM
 
8 posts, read 65,474 times
Reputation: 15

Advertisements

hey Everyone

Well,.....don't forget that it was only 7F at that time. Now that the winter is over I can totally tell you that we are a zone 5a, since the coldest was -26C at night, with a wind chill of -34C. I do have some results to say. The palms are still green, yet are drying up, I was told that they will turn brown, and grow back in the spring. The canna lilies, are starting to grow, and no word on the banana tree yet, but I will be sure to keep you guys inform.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-12-2007, 05:20 AM
 
Location: WPB, FL. Dreaming of Oil city, PA
2,909 posts, read 12,791,759 times
Reputation: 991
wow -15 degrees! Did you even protect those palms? If you can keep them alive in zone 5a, I will have NO problem growing palms in Oil city which is zone 6b-7a
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2007, 04:43 AM
 
Location: Tolland County- Northeastern CT
4,459 posts, read 6,091,541 times
Reputation: 1237
Smile Palms and sub tropicals in northern locations

I live in central Connecticut (zone 6) I grew two windmill palms in my garden over the winter- I did cover them -but added no heat. Both plants survived.
Also have a Giant sequoia - and various Yucca.

Anyone else have sub tropical to temperate stuff in their gardens this far north?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2007, 08:43 AM
 
192 posts, read 785,275 times
Reputation: 223
I overwintered Eucalyptus perriniana in my Zone 6 garden for two years, but it was in a very protected spot: a southwest facing corner formed by two of my house walls. It was undoubtedly Zone 7b in that one spot.

I think it's very possible to push the hardiness limits if you have the right microclimate somewhere in your garden, but still accept the fact that any extra seasons are definitely "a bonus"!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2007, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Tolland County- Northeastern CT
4,459 posts, read 6,091,541 times
Reputation: 1237
windflower, I totally agree;

The weather here in southern New England has been very cool and dry till now-with rain and more coming. Protecting these palms from northerly winds has allowed them to survive in this cold temperate location.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2007, 10:00 PM
 
450 posts, read 1,803,708 times
Reputation: 303
Default Micro climate is everything in the North.

When I lived in Duluth, Minnesota, the freeze in the Fall came later down by the big lake--Superior. Conversely, we had lilacs and daffodils blooming in early July cause it stayed cooler there in the Spring. More to your point--it is suprising what tropicals they grow out on Long Island near Montauk. But you do have to shelter from the wind and have a southwestern exposure to maximize things. Ever try prickly pear cactus? They are pretty hardy and have nice, waxy blooms. My Mama grew those in Northern Minnesota! But she did cover them in the winter with lots of maple leaves. Nevertheless, the ground froze pretty solid when it was below zero.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-18-2007, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Tolland County- Northeastern CT
4,459 posts, read 6,091,541 times
Reputation: 1237
I have two palms here in Connecticut- trachycarpus fortunei and trachycarpus wagnerianus (the latter having a stiffer leaf)

I covered both palms in plastic over the winter- both survived with minimal damage.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-07-2007, 11:07 PM
 
7 posts, read 41,483 times
Reputation: 11
Default Palms in northwest MN

Hey ya'll does anybody know of a palm tree or two that would survive a zome 3b/4a winter? (fan and feather palm) also looking for peach and nectarine that I know are out there that would survive in my climate zone. Peaches and Nectarines that have chilling hours of 1000+ can make it up here, just need to know which ones to put in the ground. I have two dwarfs of both kinds that are in 18 inch pots, and rated at zone 4 but would rather try something other then my two potted trees. Any ideas and/or suggestions would be great. Also I'm into tropical plants as well, such as Plumerias, just to name one, and they smell scrumptious when in bloom; any who I said all that to say if anyone has tropical and citrus plant woes, maybe I can help with some tips etc... let me know on all accounts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-09-2007, 03:03 AM
 
8 posts, read 65,474 times
Reputation: 15
Hey Everyone

Well, I have some up dates,......my sabal minor, has definately survived and my musa basjoo, by far. And surprisingly my Livistona chinensis (zone9a hardy,.) survived here,. in my chilling zone5a, in Ottawa, Ontario. I bought some more, musa basjoo, and a bigger sabal minor, and a Rhapidophyllum hystrix as a new canadate, I have heard of some people growing them here, so it is worth a try

picture 1. musa basjoo from last yr, now atleast 1ft tall, picture 2. Livistona chinensis slowly coming back.
Attached Thumbnails
Growing palm trees and other (sub)tropical plants up north.-29-05-07_1101.jpg   Growing palm trees and other (sub)tropical plants up north.-05-06-07_1430.jpg  
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-09-2007, 04:00 PM
 
Location: Missouri
109 posts, read 352,490 times
Reputation: 24
Default Norfork Pine

Good thread,....thank you.

The Norfork Island Pine (heterophylla) is zone 10 and cannot tolerate a freeze but how far up the East Coast of Florida can they safely grow? I plan on relocating somewhere between North PBC and PSL.


This is a general question but do all the tropical trees grown in arid California West Coast grow in the humid Florida tropics? Eucalyptus, Olive, and pomegranate tree varieties comes to mind but it would be great if most/all arid varieties did well in high humidity.

Thank You.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top