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Old 07-31-2022, 10:54 AM
 
Location: B.C., Canada
13,141 posts, read 11,666,789 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KaraG View Post
I'm in the hot humid south, it's been in the 90's awhile but I haven't had to do any major watering in weeks. If something looks like it's drying out, I use the old hose and thumb method, but really not too long, a minute seems plenty.

We've had very little rain until a nice drenching last night. Every other predicted rain storm has seemed to pass us by.

I've got perennials, annuals, vegetables, flowering trees and bushes and our lawn is still nice and green. Wondering if the humidity helps along with the soil and maybe the plants become very hardy. I honestly don't know, but happy I don't have to water much.
Humidity does help because not only do plants respire moisture out through their leaves (that is just one of the causes of humidity in the air), they can also absorb moisture in through their leaves and use the moisture. It happens everywhere with all plants - and it's an interesting process that can be visibly observed in the west coast rainforests that grow up mountain sides. At certain times of the day (and with daily temperature changes) we can see whole groups of trees will start releasing swirling clouds of steamy vapour into the air or else using their leaves to suck up and absorb clouds of water vapour, pollutants and nutrients directly out of the air and into the trees.

.
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Old 07-31-2022, 12:09 PM
 
8,174 posts, read 3,392,039 times
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I am in the south as well,I use the hose as well as sprinkler.
My neighbors lawns are all yellow ,what is going to happen if the grass die ?
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Old 07-31-2022, 01:55 PM
 
7,587 posts, read 5,619,117 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Humidity does help because not only do plants respire moisture out through their leaves (that is just one of the causes of humidity in the air), they can also absorb moisture in through their leaves and use the moisture. It happens everywhere with all plants - and it's an interesting process that can be visibly observed in the west coast rainforests that grow up mountain sides. At certain times of the day (and with daily temperature changes) we can see whole groups of trees will start releasing swirling clouds of steamy vapour into the air or else using their leaves to suck up and absorb clouds of water vapour, pollutants and nutrients directly out of the air and into the trees.

.
That's so interesting.
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Old 08-01-2022, 04:44 PM
 
1,243 posts, read 1,503,525 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mojo101 View Post
I am in the south as well,I use the hose as well as sprinkler.
My neighbors lawns are all yellow ,what is going to happen if the grass die ?

I worry about that too..
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Old 08-01-2022, 05:10 PM
 
Location: B.C., Canada
13,141 posts, read 11,666,789 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mojo101 View Post
I am in the south as well,I use the hose as well as sprinkler.
My neighbors lawns are all yellow ,what is going to happen if the grass die ?
The grass blades will die and turn to "hay" and the grass roots will go dormant. That's what grasses are evolved to do under difficult climate conditions. When the weather changes to wetter/cooler conditions the roots will come out of dormancy and start growing new blades of grass again. You might have to put down grass seed as well.

If your neighbours' lawns are all yellow then that means they are following water conservation regulations for your district. You should be doing the same thing as all your neighbours. Otherwise if you continue to keep your lawn green from using more water than you should be using while your neighbours are being law-abiding citizens with yellow grass then you could get into trouble. Your neighbours are going to start getting resentful of you for being wasteful of water and you can be guaranteed somebody will report you to bylaws enforcement and you can be fined.

Conservation of water during dry or drought conditions is extremely important and becoming more and more important with every passing year.

.
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Old 08-02-2022, 05:20 PM
 
Location: TEXAS
2,549 posts, read 728,465 times
Reputation: 1499
Quote:
Originally Posted by ellenrr View Post
In NJ we haven't had rain in forever. I water 2 hours in the morning, 3-4 times a week. I start at 5:30 am. I have annuals and perenniels. I've decided to concentrate on the newish perenniels. I water all the perenniels about once a week, but the newish ones (one or two years old) 2 -3 times a week. Very very deep. I put the hose nozzle on the earth, and let the water drip in right where the roots are. I Used to do that for 5 minutes at a spot, now I do it for 10 minutes. My annuals which are zinnias I also do 2-3 times a week for the special ones that I really like, the others, less so.
It takes me two hours because I move the nozzle from one location to another. I have 2 plots in a community garden, each one 25 feet by 25 feet.
I watch people water from a hose, which loses 70% of the water output to evaporation. And since they do it for 15 minutes, little of the water gets in to the earth.
I was thinking of getting a soaker hose, but the I read that it takes 200 minutes for a soaker hose to provide one inch of water. That would not help in this situation. As one inch hardly is anything under the curent situation.
We need several days of soaking rain, and I don't see that in the near future.
May not work for you, but I keep old gallon milk jugs, and make a pinhole in the bottom corner on each one.
Only takes a few seconds to 'fill' each jug and place it where it will slowly dribble into ground right next to plants I'm wanting to keep healthy. I then collect the empty jugs after they empty.

Done the same thing using 5gal plastic buckets - small hole in bottom, placed next to small tree I'm trying to get established. Takes only 30 seconds to fill the bucket, then it dribbles for half an hour onto tree.

Good luck, it's dry (& hot) here in Texas too!
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Old 08-11-2022, 05:28 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
79,249 posts, read 66,778,520 times
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The most awesome visual of a ground experiment I seen!! CLICK LINK to see the video.

When you turn a cup of water upside down on wet grass the water soaks right in, on normal grass it soaks in slowly, on dry ground it barely absorbs hence the flash flooding results as the water runs off easily and doesn't get absorbed.


https://twitter.com/UniofReading/sta...50976725581824





You can avoid this by
1. Adding compost to your soils
2. Keeping it moist with sprinklers, hose, mulch, ect
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Old 08-11-2022, 11:17 AM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
16,822 posts, read 19,587,762 times
Reputation: 18970
Quote:
Originally Posted by CCCyou View Post
May not work for you, but I keep old gallon milk jugs, and make a pinhole in the bottom corner on each one.
Only takes a few seconds to 'fill' each jug and place it where it will slowly dribble into ground right next to plants I'm wanting to keep healthy. I then collect the empty jugs after they empty.

Done the same thing using 5gal plastic buckets - small hole in bottom, placed next to small tree I'm trying to get established. Takes only 30 seconds to fill the bucket, then it dribbles for half an hour onto tree.

Good luck, it's dry (& hot) here in Texas too!
That bucket idea is awesome. We have a few small fruit trees we're trying to establish and I'm going to try that.
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Old 08-11-2022, 01:56 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
31,165 posts, read 32,097,308 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Threerun View Post
That bucket idea is awesome. We have a few small fruit trees we're trying to establish and I'm going to try that.
I bought a tree watering ring for that purpose.

https://www.google.com/search?q=Tree...h=510&dpr=1.65
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Old 08-13-2022, 08:00 AM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
11,579 posts, read 11,274,508 times
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After all those heavy rain events and the consequential floods here in Sydney, I'm gonna have to say that rain is much worse for plants than drought. I lost like 5 plants in my yard due to the wet soil and a few others were injured (with their growth and vigor repressed).

I'd take droughts any day, because at least I can control the water with sprinklers (though when we have drought, we have water restrictions, so I just use a hose).
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