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Old 07-22-2008, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
183,825 posts, read 74,960,655 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
What a great idea. My garden certainly provides them with flower nectar out the wazoo -- right now they're loving the catmint and echinacea that are in bloom, but a little more help never hurt. Especially since we're experiencing quite the dry spell.


I do! A back 40 ... inches!
Hey I've got a 40" plus waist? Does that count. Back to the watermelon. That gives me an idea for a photo close up. May can get multiple species of bees at the same time. I remember seeing the yellow bodied and the more black bodied bees years ago. If so I'll post a pic for ya'll. Have a good night all. At one time I wanted my on hive. That may still happen. The sad thing I see in the news is that they are in decline and no one knows for sure why. Seems like they have been smitten by a plague of their own. The more wild ones saved and kept healthy the better.
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Old 07-22-2008, 07:15 PM
 
Location: Gary, WV & Springfield, ME
5,826 posts, read 8,458,040 times
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Hummingbird and bee nectar

#1 -
3 cups water
3 cups sugar
heat water until boiling. Add sugar and stir until dissolved. Allow to cool and fill feeders.

#2 -
3 Cups water
2 1/2 Cups brown Sugar
Heat water to boiling. Add sugar and stir until dissolved. Allow to cool and then place in shallow, flat plates - barely enough to wet the plate - for the bees. You have to be very careful about the depth of the bee platter because unlike plain water, the sugar water won't just evaporate off them if they get it on their wings or legs. The stickiness will disable them and that's not the plan. Just barely making the plate wet will do. Better to have several plates of barely there food than one deep dish. The hummingbirds like this mixture too and it's my favorite recipe since you don't need to add coloring to see the level left in the feeder. The brown does that nicely.

With both recipes, store unused portion in the fridge and warm to room temperature before putting into the feeders.
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Old 07-22-2008, 08:52 PM
 
4,541 posts, read 12,759,338 times
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Thank you for the recipe.

I've never made it... only used the mix.

Now I've got to figure out where to put my feeder on my deck. That was the second one that's come up looking for food. This one was gorgeous, it had a reddish orange chest!
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Old 07-23-2008, 07:20 AM
 
Location: Gary, WV & Springfield, ME
5,826 posts, read 8,458,040 times
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You can get by using half the amount of sugar, but when you use the formula with the same amount of sugar as water, you don't get just one or two hummingbirds - you get the whole flock and no matter what time of day you get to gaze outside, there is going to be a couple hummers there feeding - all day long.
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Old 07-23-2008, 12:41 PM
JnR
 
Location: Central Coast, Ca
1,709 posts, read 777,299 times
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I, too, have a hummingbird feeder on our deck and I love to watch them come up and feed. They are like little helicopters! I haven't noticed any bees around the feeder, but I have a lot of flowers and vegetables in containers on the deck and I think that is keeping the bees happy. And I do see them visiting the bird bath as well. During my Master Gardener training we had to do a group presentation and my group decided to do pollinators, specifically the honey bee. I learned a lot about them! We even went to visit a local bee keeper and he showed us the queen bee and told us all about bee keeping and the problems he has had with his hives in the last few years. Interesting stuff!
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Old 07-28-2008, 10:21 PM
 
Location: Southern California
421 posts, read 2,740,882 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Janecj View Post
I wonder why they just sit on the bird bath drinking water all the time.
Maybe they're diabetic?
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Old 07-29-2008, 10:24 AM
 
4,541 posts, read 12,759,338 times
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Default Just made my second batch!

Quote:
Originally Posted by AliceT View Post
You can get by using half the amount of sugar, but when you use the formula with the same amount of sugar as water, you don't get just one or two hummingbirds - you get the whole flock and no matter what time of day you get to gaze outside, there is going to be a couple hummers there feeding - all day long.
I made a batch on Saturday and filled my feeder. I added a couple of drops of red food coloring.

I just made another batch so it's ready for refilling..

It's so hot. I think I'll clean it and refill it today.

Thanks for the recipe!
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Old 07-29-2008, 10:49 AM
 
26,886 posts, read 38,123,724 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AliceT View Post
My sugar bill is through the roof - primarily because I make sugar water to keep my hummingbird feeders full.

At their request, I feed the bees. I found that bees were drawn to my hummingbird feeders and would sometimes swarm them to the point the hummingbirds couldn't access them. So I selected another area and put some sugar water in a very shallow dish for the bees. It was a hit. There are no hives here, but I am fond of feeding the bees now as they pose no threat to me. Somehow, it seems to me that they know I am a friend and am putting food out specifically for them. Not so long ago, if someone told me to walk into a swarm of bees I'd think they were nut cases. And yet, here I am today, very mobility challenged and hobbling among the bees to fill their plates with sugar water.

Does anyone else include the bees in their wildlife feeding stations?
Thanks for posting this. I am going to try it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
What a great idea. My garden certainly provides them with flower nectar out the wazoo -- right now they're loving the catmint and echinacea that are in bloom, but a little more help never hurt. Especially since we're experiencing quite the dry spell.
We'll trade you for a while. We have already had more than twice our normal rainfall for the year! Some areas last week got 9" in one storm. We received 3" overnight Sunday. Flooding all over, 20" trees split and/or pushed over, 9500 without power. My veggie garden gave up this year, not enough sun. More is coming, of course. Wish I could find a way to ship it over.
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Old 07-29-2008, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Pacific Northwest
1,077 posts, read 3,797,486 times
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Just a couple of things I read on the internet ..

When making the sugar solution, boil the water for a minute, add sugar and boil for another.

The food colouring isn't good for them. Even a little red dot on the spout should draw them in.

Don't hang in hot sun. The nectar gets too hot and will burn them and they'll probably die.

Also, change the solution every few days. Otherwise it can get moldy and cause a fatal fungus infection to the hummers.
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Old 07-29-2008, 01:27 PM
 
4,541 posts, read 12,759,338 times
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Default I just moved my feeder!...

Quote:
Originally Posted by stone-ground View Post
Just a couple of things I read on the internet ..

When making the sugar solution, boil the water for a minute, add sugar and boil for another.

The food colouring isn't good for them. Even a little red dot on the spout should draw them in.

Don't hang in hot sun. The nectar gets too hot and will burn them and they'll probably die.

Also, change the solution every few days. Otherwise it can get moldy and cause a fatal fungus infection to the hummers.
Thank you for your post.

I just went out and pulled my feeder down, dumped it and washed it with a little bit of vinegar in the water (that was on the feeder box). I also moved my bracket to a place on the deck where it only gets sun later in the afternoon.

My feeder was only out since Saturday but I noticed that the solution smelled a little sour already.

I also took the fresh solution that I just made and stuck it in the microwave for a few minutes to be sure that I killed any bacteria and to be sure that it's been boiled. It's in the freezer cooling right now!

The good news is that I just looked out on the deck and saw one of my new friends hovering around looking for the feeder so hopefully I didn't make any of them sick...

I just had that feeder up for a couple of days ... but in this heat we need to keep an eye on them!

Thanks again for your post!

Last edited by World Citizen; 07-29-2008 at 02:01 PM..
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