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Old 07-20-2008, 03:38 AM
 
Location: Gary, WV & Springfield, ME
5,826 posts, read 8,459,169 times
Reputation: 17250

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My sugar bill is through the roof - primarily because I make sugar water to keep my hummingbird feeders full.

At their request, I feed the bees. I found that bees were drawn to my hummingbird feeders and would sometimes swarm them to the point the hummingbirds couldn't access them. So I selected another area and put some sugar water in a very shallow dish for the bees. It was a hit. There are no hives here, but I am fond of feeding the bees now as they pose no threat to me. Somehow, it seems to me that they know I am a friend and am putting food out specifically for them. Not so long ago, if someone told me to walk into a swarm of bees I'd think they were nut cases. And yet, here I am today, very mobility challenged and hobbling among the bees to fill their plates with sugar water.

Does anyone else include the bees in their wildlife feeding stations?
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Old 07-20-2008, 05:02 AM
 
9,912 posts, read 12,183,162 times
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That sounds fantastic Alice.

I'm highly allergic so no walking amongst them for me, but I do love the bees. I'm glad they've found a friend.
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Old 07-20-2008, 05:35 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
1,005 posts, read 4,945,603 times
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I have that problem as well. I found that spraying the hummingbird feeder with PAM keeps the bees away. (old trick) Also, this year I find that I have many, many bees at my bird bath. I've never seen this before. I like bees too and it doesn't bother me except on the hummingbird feeder, but I wonder why they just sit on the bird bath drinking water all the time.
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Old 07-20-2008, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
183,827 posts, read 74,970,778 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Janecj View Post
I have that problem as well. I found that spraying the hummingbird feeder with PAM keeps the bees away. (old trick) Also, this year I find that I have many, many bees at my bird bath. I've never seen this before. I like bees too and it doesn't bother me except on the hummingbird feeder, but I wonder why they just sit on the bird bath drinking water all the time.

Bees must have water to make honey. It's a component part. Another tip is if you have a back 40 so to speak so that it is not a mess, bees love to feed on watermelon rind and cantalope rind. It's the natural sugar. Flies can be a problem so you must leave it out just so long and then dispose of it in the compost bin. That would help with the sugar bill and help the bees too.
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Old 07-20-2008, 08:25 AM
 
Location: Knoxville
4,135 posts, read 19,725,943 times
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We have a lot of flowers in the yard, so I thing the bees are pretty happy here. I have noticed that they seem to an unusual interest in one of my bog plants in the pond. No flowers, just kind of a mossy place, and there are dozen hanging around this plant, and of course the lily pad blooms.
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Old 07-20-2008, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
1,005 posts, read 4,945,603 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomadicus View Post
Bees must have water to make honey. It's a component part. Another tip is if you have a back 40 so to speak so that it is not a mess, bees love to feed on watermelon rind and cantalope rind. It's the natural sugar. Flies can be a problem so you must leave it out just so long and then dispose of it in the compost bin. That would help with the sugar bill and help the bees too.

Makes sense, just never seen or noticed it before. Darn, just threw out my watermelon rind.
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Old 07-20-2008, 10:42 AM
 
Location: Hartwell--IN THE City of Cincinnati
1,055 posts, read 3,561,254 times
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I love this forum...I was just watering again this morning (no rain in Cincy and has been very hot) and have been filling up my bird bath every other day. I noticed the amount of bees in the bath this week... I carefully spray it out and fill it up again and even while I am still filling the bath, the bees are trying to get to the water. Makes me happy to read they need the water to make honey. A bird bath in the center of my flower garden has become a water hole for birds, butterflies and now bees. Its fun to sit on the porch and watch all the activity in the garden. Again...fun posts..thanks!
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Old 07-21-2008, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Gary, WV & Springfield, ME
5,826 posts, read 8,459,169 times
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Now I am trying to identify them all. Never knew there was more than the honey bee and the bumblebee. So I'm getting an education now, too.
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Old 07-21-2008, 06:18 PM
 
4,541 posts, read 12,761,272 times
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Default Care to share your recipe for Hummingbird Nectar?...

Quote:
Originally Posted by AliceT View Post
My sugar bill is through the roof - primarily because I make sugar water to keep my hummingbird feeders full.

At their request, I feed the bees. I found that bees were drawn to my hummingbird feeders and would sometimes swarm them to the point the hummingbirds couldn't access them. So I selected another area and put some sugar water in a very shallow dish for the bees. It was a hit. There are no hives here, but I am fond of feeding the bees now as they pose no threat to me. Somehow, it seems to me that they know I am a friend and am putting food out specifically for them. Not so long ago, if someone told me to walk into a swarm of bees I'd think they were nut cases. And yet, here I am today, very mobility challenged and hobbling among the bees to fill their plates with sugar water.

Does anyone else include the bees in their wildlife feeding stations?
This is an interesting thread. I'm very concerned about our bee population and what's going on with them.

At the risk of being OT, would you be so kind as to share your Hummingbird Nectar recipe? I haven't put up my feeders yet but a hummingbird came right up on my deck this afternoon. I'm inspired!
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Old 07-22-2008, 01:43 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,164 posts, read 57,288,199 times
Reputation: 52030
What a great idea. My garden certainly provides them with flower nectar out the wazoo -- right now they're loving the catmint and echinacea that are in bloom, but a little more help never hurt. Especially since we're experiencing quite the dry spell.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomadicus View Post
if you have a back 40
I do! A back 40 ... inches!
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