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Old 01-06-2009, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Floribama
13,149 posts, read 28,876,415 times
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Water Oak is the most common oak in my area. They're actually a bit weedy because those tiny acorns germinate at the drop of a hat. They don't need alot of water as the name suggests, they do fine in soil with normal moisture. They're not my favorite tree because they're rather short lived and start rotting when less than 50 years old. I have some huge ones out there that are beginning to fall apart, I also have millions of babies waiting to take over. I wouldn't want one next to my house. Laurel Oak is very similar to Water Oak but has more slender leaves, it also shares the bad traits. I'd compare it with Silver Maple as far as durability.

The bark on Live Oak has a blocky texture, and it's almost black. The bark on Water Oak is a lighter gray and is smoother, it's often stained with slime flux.
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Old 01-07-2009, 12:03 AM
 
Location: Northeast Tennessee
7,301 posts, read 22,479,373 times
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Thanks for the advice on the trees, as I was not familiar with them. I have two Live Oaks now, so maybe I will be better off with them since they are a longer lived tree?

Thats disappointing about the trees rotting early @ 50 years - even though that will be near the end of my life if I live to be in my early 80s, still would not want one thats about to die then.

Thanks again!

Quote:
Originally Posted by southernnaturelover View Post
Water Oak is the most common oak in my area. They're actually a bit weedy because those tiny acorns germinate at the drop of a hat. They don't need alot of water as the name suggests, they do fine in soil with normal moisture. They're not my favorite tree because they're rather short lived and start rotting when less than 50 years old. I have some huge ones out there that are beginning to fall apart, I also have millions of babies waiting to take over. I wouldn't want one next to my house. Laurel Oak is very similar to Water Oak but has more slender leaves, it also shares the bad traits. I'd compare it with Silver Maple as far as durability.

The bark on Live Oak has a blocky texture, and it's almost black. The bark on Water Oak is a lighter gray and is smoother, it's often stained with slime flux.
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Old 01-07-2009, 06:52 PM
 
Location: Floribama
13,149 posts, read 28,876,415 times
Reputation: 11345
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tennesseestorm View Post
Thanks for the advice on the trees, as I was not familiar with them. I have two Live Oaks now, so maybe I will be better off with them since they are a longer lived tree?

Thats disappointing about the trees rotting early @ 50 years - even though that will be near the end of my life if I live to be in my early 80s, still would not want one thats about to die then.

Thanks again!
Here's a few pics of my older Water Oaks. In one pic you can see how the rot advances once a branch has broken. In another pic you can see the millions of little acorns that are like walking on marbles. Sometimes I wish the things would go ahead and fall down so I can plant something better (one more strong hurricane and that wish may come true).

http://i207.photobucket.com/albums/bb183/escambiaguy/tree%20pics/wo2.jpg (broken link)

http://i207.photobucket.com/albums/bb183/escambiaguy/tree%20pics/wo1.jpg (broken link)

http://i207.photobucket.com/albums/bb183/escambiaguy/tree%20pics/wo3.jpg (broken link)
http://i207.photobucket.com/albums/bb183/escambiaguy/tree%20pics/wo4.jpg (broken link)
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Old 05-23-2014, 05:51 PM
 
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I am interested to know if the huge tree growing in McMinnville, Tennessee with branches growing down to the ground is a live oak tree. I have never seen anything like it before.
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Old 05-23-2014, 07:12 PM
 
Location: Native Floridian, USA
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I had 5 oaks, growing in a cluster, removed from my back yard in the last year. the canopy was 100'x 115'. You couldn't see my property or much of the dwelling from google earth because of the trees. Quite a few of the branches were propped up and some were quite low. People would come by to see the trees , though. It was a beautiful sight. They were about 60 years old, as best as we could tell.

Having said that, I once had a Board Certified Master Arborist come out and consult with me about the trees in my yard, which were live oaks. He said my oaks showed characteristics of several different types of oaks, as all oaks did, but primarily live oak. They interbred regularly and the best analogy was what we see in oaks is like a mongrol dog. Unfortunately, they had to come down last year. i wish I knew how to post a picture here of my then back yard.

Quercus virginiana - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Oak - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 05-23-2014, 08:07 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
27,852 posts, read 49,299,803 times
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In the San Francisco Bay Area they have Coast Live Oaks, and I brought an acorn up and planted it in 1994 to use as a bonsai. In winter when it gets below freezing I have to keep it with some other cold-sensitive trees in a heated greenhouse. It's now 20 years old. I haven't used any wire on it, just directional pruning to get the shape.
Attached Thumbnails
Live Oaks-clo2.jpg  
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Old 05-23-2014, 11:03 PM
 
1,465 posts, read 765,185 times
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folks in colder areas might consider using the north texas and Oklahoma escarpment live oak quercus fusiformis (sometimes regarded as a subspecies of the southern live oak----q. virginiana ssp. fusiformis) as it is regarded as hardier to adverse conditions than that species. one might also consider the interesting hybrid of virginiana with the deciduous q. stellata (post oak) known as "Compton oak" (this can vary by condition from basically evergreen to full deciduous), the seni-evergreen "upland laurel oak" q. hemisphaerica, or even the Japanese evergreen species q. myrsinifolia which is also supposed to be more cold hardy than the native live oak. in any case, in those marginal/colder areas, proper siting of what you plant may be just as important as what you plant---siting the tree in a sunny, warm spot protected against cold winter winds and potentially giving extra protective cover in hard winters to young plant (including mulching around the base to protect the roots) might be the difference between success or failure.

Last edited by georgeinbandonoregon; 05-23-2014 at 11:36 PM.. Reason: add more information
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Old 05-16-2018, 07:15 AM
 
1 posts, read 113 times
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I see a lot of zone maps and the difficulty is making an accurate, detailed map that correctly separates areas that have very different climates in the same portion of a state. I live in an area 30 miles south of Atlanta and am 150 feet in elevation lower than Atlanta. The town of Carrollton 30 miles west of Atlanta, at an elevation 600 feet higher than Atlanta, sometimes gets temperatures at least 20 degrees F cooler than I do. About 60 miles east of me is Eatonton, the one town that consistently sees the highest temperatures in the whole state, including the area bordering Florida and the Atlantic Ocean. We do get a temperature of -5F occasionally, and sometimes with precipitation, but within 2 days all the snow and ice is gone, and my southern live oak recovers. Carrollton still has ice on the roads and trees 3 weeks later. The southern live oak thriving in my front yard would probably be dead by now if it were growing in Carrollton. You won't find a chart that puts my home, Carrollton, Eatonton, and Atlanta into two or three different zones, because that chart would be an overwhelming task for anyone to draw, but the fact remains that the climates are very different. The climate around a river is completely different from that on the leeward side of a mountain, but you won't see charts pointing out every river and mountain in every state to show you what plants will grow there. The zone maps are only a simplified suggestion. You should consider many other environmental factors before you trust your landscaping and agriculture to those 10-zone charts.
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Old 05-16-2018, 07:52 AM
 
11,003 posts, read 16,563,836 times
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I have become enamored with Live Oaks and did some research to see if they would grow here in Zone 7A.

I found some posting where someone was growing one in Illinois with "no problems." I think it was 6A or 6B.

Proper sighting, some winter protection for the first couple of years, and some luck might bring success.
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Old 05-16-2018, 02:15 PM
 
23,117 posts, read 17,122,814 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moth View Post
I have become enamored with Live Oaks and did some research to see if they would grow here in Zone 7A.

I found some posting where someone was growing one in Illinois with "no problems." I think it was 6A or 6B.

Proper sighting, some winter protection for the first couple of years, and some luck might bring success.
so.. are you planning to try growing them?

i would have thought zone 7 would be way too cold. i would love to have them myself.
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