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Old 01-04-2009, 11:48 AM
 
Location: The South
264 posts, read 997,802 times
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Does anyone know how far north live oaks will grow?Id like to try and grow one, but I havent seen any here in Memphis area. Anyone had any experience with them?? Ive been down farther south and seen them grow huge, only heard of a couple this far north... well any help would be greatly appreciated Thanks
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Old 01-04-2009, 11:55 AM
 
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Live Oaks like a humid area such as is found on the east coast.
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Old 01-04-2009, 02:29 PM
 
Location: somewhere close to Tampa, but closer to the beach
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Most references list the Southern Live Oak as being hardy as far north as USDA 7B,and marginal in 7A. If you look your area up under many of the older maps,7A would fall just south of Memphis but, If you use the latest map from the Arbor Day Society,the Memphis area would fall under zone 7B..so more than likely,live oaks should be able to survive if planted in your area..
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Old 01-04-2009, 06:20 PM
 
Location: WA
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Live Oaks will thrive pretty far north until low temps kill them... Dallas had many more (lots decades old) until December of 1983 when a cold surge kept temps belove freezing for a couple of weeks touching below zero a night or two. Many large trees in unprotected areas were damaged and died over the next year.
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Old 01-05-2009, 11:17 PM
 
Location: Northeast Tennessee
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They will EASILY grow in the Memphis area. I am on the opposite end of the state in extreme northeast Tennessee and I have two that I have had for years! They flourish here! I am at 1500 ft elevation. I also know someone even further northeast of me up in central Virginia around Blacksburg (one of the cool spots in Virginia) that claim they have had success with them.

Technically they are rated down to zone 7b (marginal 7a like SI33 mentioned) and I am in zone 7a (bordering 6b) and have had no problems. I heard they will survive as cold as about -3. I know many people in Memphis that have them. I think most of southwest TN is zone 7b, but one map I seen showed extreme southwest TN in 8a.

My aunt lives in upstate South Carolina in Anderson, which probably has about the same climate as Memphis and I see them growing rampant in upstate South Carolina. Even in the wild.

These trees can either grow low and spread out, or in other conditions, will grow taller rather than wider.

Here are some that I took that were in my aunts neighborhood in South Carolina..... I took these the last week of October of 2008 when we were down there. These are the smaller ones I seen.






Quote:
Originally Posted by TN-rox View Post
Does anyone know how far north live oaks will grow?Id like to try and grow one, but I havent seen any here in Memphis area. Anyone had any experience with them?? Ive been down farther south and seen them grow huge, only heard of a couple this far north... well any help would be greatly appreciated Thanks
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Old 01-06-2009, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Floribama
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TNStorm, those oaks in the top picture look like either Water Oak or Laurel Oak to me, I have them everywhere.
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Old 01-06-2009, 12:25 PM
 
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Default Live Oaks

The natural range is smaller/different then their current range. Live Oaks grow best where winters are mild.... with temps "generally" staying above 20 F. and hard freezes (>28 F) no later then April. Large specimens can stand greater extremes in temps.

Live Oaks will leaf out/leaf in mid March(+ or -)... which is their vunerable time. Point is... if the temps are much below freezing, the tree can/will split from the expansion of water to ice within the trunk. Keep it from freezing and all is good.
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Old 01-06-2009, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
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They're very common in Dallas, but I haven't seen them in Oklahoma City, so their territory must fall somewhere between the two cities in the central U.S.
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Old 01-06-2009, 04:11 PM
 
Location: The South
264 posts, read 997,802 times
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Thanks to all who have posted
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Old 01-06-2009, 06:42 PM
 
Location: Northeast Tennessee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southernnaturelover View Post
TNStorm, those oaks in the top picture look like either Water Oak or Laurel Oak to me, I have them everywhere.
Ya know - they could be. I just googled them and some of the leaves on the Water Oaks on Google look like the ones on those trees at the top of the photo. That tree in the middle and lower photo I think were Live Oaks, because the leaves look more like the leaves on my Live Oaks. Its really amazing how much the leaves look like that of the Live Oak. The Water Oaks are very nice looking trees. I would not mind having one myself.

I had forgot about the Water Oak. Seems they are in the same basic range as the Live Oak, or maybe slightly hardier.

You say you have Water Oaks? Are they placed where they get alot of water? Seems this is a water loving tree (I guess hence the name), but can adapt to drier conditions.
Thanks for that heads-up!
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