U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 03-12-2009, 11:24 AM
 
Location: Ocean Shores, WA
5,082 posts, read 12,577,145 times
Reputation: 10543

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by younglisa7 View Post

Rebar was recommended in the SFG book to use for the growing(vine) plants.
I like to use galvanized electrical conduit for general gardening purposes. It's lighter, cleaner, and a lot easier to work with than rebar. You can cut it in seconds with a tube cutter and you can even bend it into curved shapes. There are also various fittings which let you join sections and make angle connections.

I use it for lots of things including tomato stakes, pea and bean trellis, and to hold netting tents for shade or pest protection. It can also be taken down easily for storage or crop rotation.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-12-2009, 02:43 PM
Status: "I cannot wait for the heat to break..." (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,368 posts, read 25,483,948 times
Reputation: 87958
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Freddy View Post
I like to use galvanized electrical conduit for general gardening purposes. It's lighter, cleaner, and a lot easier to work with than rebar. You can cut it in seconds with a tube cutter and you can even bend it into curved shapes. There are also various fittings which let you join sections and make angle connections.

I use it for lots of things including tomato stakes, pea and bean trellis, and to hold netting tents for shade or pest protection. It can also be taken down easily for storage or crop rotation.
.


Good idea. Thanks. I already have the rebar so I'll try that this year and a cut off wheel will cut anything.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-13-2009, 06:47 PM
Ode
 
298 posts, read 669,451 times
Reputation: 386
Quote:
Originally Posted by younglisa7 View Post
Ode- Great idea. How deep is the soil in the 5 gallon buckets? Do you plant 1 plant per bucket? This sounds like something for my stepdaughter. She has a sloped yard which would be really hard to garden but she has a great deck.

Thanks
Lisa
It depends on the buckets. Some, like the ones you get in Lowes or Ace Hardware are deeper. There are other plastic buckets that are wider rather than deep. I only put a single plant in each bucket. I would guess the soil is around 18 inches or so deep per bucket, but remember to leave 4 inches or so at the top so you can mulch and get water in it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-22-2009, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Mississippi
3,927 posts, read 7,724,269 times
Reputation: 11390
My father in law just finished and brought to me my first couple of squares. I wanted two x four ones for salad garden and for onions. I am so excited, now I must go and get the correct amount of soils....it's gardening day here. :-)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-27-2009, 07:02 PM
 
Location: USA
3,966 posts, read 9,150,540 times
Reputation: 2197
any square foot gardeners use worms for their plants?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-31-2009, 05:17 PM
 
9,558 posts, read 26,408,859 times
Reputation: 9679
Thumbs up update

Well, my veggies are still in the early stages since I had to start over a few weeks back after the snow. Now that the weather is warming up I expect the speed of plant growth will pick up somewhat. Here is what my square foot garden looks like today...

Square foot garden


The onions are coming along nicely


Broccoli has sprouted


Some romaine lettuce seedlings


The spinach is coming along strong
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-31-2009, 11:21 PM
 
Location: Mississippi
3,927 posts, read 7,724,269 times
Reputation: 11390
wow NRGuy, your garden looks well under way! I have mine all ready but held off till this last frost passed us and the severe storms passed, didn't want wind and hail to damage them. How long did it take the Romaine to come up? I was going to go with plants but everyone is out. Guess it will need to be seeds.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-01-2009, 08:19 AM
Status: "I cannot wait for the heat to break..." (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,368 posts, read 25,483,948 times
Reputation: 87958
Thanks NRG

Still waitng for better weather here.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-01-2009, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Richardson, TX
10,116 posts, read 16,713,055 times
Reputation: 24580
I planted a bunch of pea seeds in a very large pot and now I have healthy looking shoots a couple of inches tall. Should I thin them, or let them go crazy? Is now the time to thin them? I'm never sure when!


My 2 x 4 plot currently has italian parsley, 2 roma tomato transplants, some chives, and a few radishes, carrots, and leeks. The last two seem to be growing very slowly.

I have a pot of basil seedlings going too.. I can't wait.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-14-2009, 08:24 PM
 
Location: Lemon Grove, CA USA
1,055 posts, read 3,482,893 times
Reputation: 936
I really like how Mel's book is laid out (just got it off Amazon). Over the next week or two I'll be tearing down the weed shrouded mess that is my backyard and be building 2-3 boxes. I'm going to go concrete block though I think for the permanence. Might even make them a couple deep so I can sit on the edge to garden... what can I say I'm lazy, lol.

I figure herbs and catnip and of course all the vegetables I like on rotation so I can have some around whenever I want them. Being in southern California I can get away with growing many things year round which will be nice.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top