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Old 07-20-2017, 04:38 PM
 
9,282 posts, read 4,736,816 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LoriNJ View Post
I pulled 4 hornworms off my tomatoes. All 4 were dead or dying, with lots of pupating parasitic wasps bursting through their bellies. Heh heh.

Something is taking bites out of my yellow pear and Sweet 100 cherry tomatoes. I can't figure what is doing it. "Bite" isn't quite the word. Some of the tomatoes have what look like erosions their skin, while others have chunks missing. Darn it!
Around here it's grasshoppers. But we did catch a tiny mouse yesterday. Mouses usually pick the tomato and go hide somewhere to eat. They don't snack on the plant.
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Old 07-20-2017, 05:12 PM
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
183,840 posts, read 74,970,778 times
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Pulled one red ripe tomato that some critter beat me to. Must have been a field mouse or similar. Deep tapered hole. Tossed it. The large brandywine was splitting and it is being prepared for supper. Tomatoes this year are what they are. While trying to build Rome in a day I put little effort into them. Now they are sprawling out of pots with tomatoes on the plastic and out on the grass. Looks like enough for us and a very nice neighbor but canning will not happen this year. Deer have destroyed 80% of the green and yellow bush beans. That's a first. It takes a 10' fence here I'm told to keep them out of a garden. Then I was given a tip. A glob of peanut butter connected to the electric stock fence. As brazen as these deer are it might just work. A local farmer told me deer will push through a few strands of hot wire like they don't feel it. I thought we were going to be deer safe locating near downtown but it didn't pay to think.
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Old 07-20-2017, 06:32 PM
 
Location: Western Colorado
10,521 posts, read 11,628,203 times
Reputation: 24173
I have little baby tomatoes, and squash, and bell peppers, and chili peppers! In about 4 more weeks I'll have fresh tomatoes. I picked fresh buttercrunch lettuce and kale today for a salad with supper, and an onion. WOO HOO!
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Old 07-21-2017, 05:16 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
64,990 posts, read 47,303,288 times
Reputation: 10512
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomadicus View Post
Good idea. I got grass clippings by the truck loads in the 70's. Only one bad lesson learned. Make sure no weed control product is fresh in the clippings. I used some fresh ones to mulch sweet peas with and killed the row. Should have composted maybe. .

Yeah, definitely should of composted it. Fresh grass or leaves is never good to use directly into a garden.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomadicus View Post
This fall I'm going to offer free bags to anyone who will give me there yard leaves. There are rules here about leaf disposal. I won't compost but will till them in and let them compost that way. They are acidic so I'll add some lime.

Nice trade there. Did you know a compost pile will neutralize the PH of everything? Or at least lower the acidity from original levels. Always best to compost. Always hated the concept of tilling them in or putting them underground. You need heat & air to break them down fast enough and healthy enough.
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Old 07-21-2017, 05:18 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
64,990 posts, read 47,303,288 times
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July 20, 2017. My little harvest from my little garden this yr. lol


Feels so weird not harvesting things. It's been nice not to worry about watering & attending the garden this year but I do miss it.

Rapunzel Tomatoes. Best Cherries I've grown & tasted. Will add this to must have list.


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Old 07-21-2017, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
183,840 posts, read 74,970,778 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
Nice trade there. Did you know a compost pile will neutralize the PH of everything? Or at least lower the acidity from original levels. Always best to compost. Always hated the concept of tilling them in or putting them underground. You need heat & air to break them down fast enough and healthy enough.
I till weekly to bring air in. My way to stir things up. Soil bacteria plus nitrogen will digest green manure or cover crops. After leaves are tilled in I will plant a cover crop of winter rye and when 8" high till it under. This sandstone soil needs all the organic matter I can give it. I just tilled the small fall plot again that was sod. 5th time. Killing weed seed, grubs, etc. This soil is very mineral deficient so I hand broadcast a light application of what hundreds of years what has gone out to sea. After 4 weeks the soil is blacker with the composted grass. There's no way my back will cooperate turning compost by hand now. No problem 50 years ago. If I had three times the space I'd buy a compact tractor and keep half in a clover alfalfa mix cover crop. Alfalfa puts down very deep roots that will become channels to allow water and air to go deeper and clover adds bulk organic to hold water during dry spells. Alfalfa will bring to the surface needed minerals from depths that possibly only asparagus may reach. It's time for round two. Cultivating today and side dressing cow peas and okra. Never planted sugar snap peas in the fall before but it might work for the premature stir fry pods. Nothing to lose. My grandfather had a luxury while market farming 3 acres I don't have. A mule with all the attachments. Memories.
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Old 07-21-2017, 09:07 AM
 
Location: too far from the sea
17,987 posts, read 17,140,226 times
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I have little green cherry tomatoes and bigger green Celebrities. Beet greens galore with beets nearly ready to pull.

I had made a mistake of not being careful about making compost this year so it was mostly nitrogen and tomatoes grown in it weren't doing anything except making leaves. Added bone meal and boy, are they happy now!
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Old 07-21-2017, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
64,990 posts, read 47,303,288 times
Reputation: 10512
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomadicus View Post
I till weekly to bring air in. My way to stir things up. Soil bacteria plus nitrogen will digest green manure or cover crops. After leaves are tilled in I will plant a cover crop of winter rye and when 8" high till it under. This sandstone soil needs all the organic matter I can give it. I just tilled the small fall plot again that was sod. 5th time. Killing weed seed, grubs, etc. This soil is very mineral deficient so I hand broadcast a light application of what hundreds of years what has gone out to sea. After 4 weeks the soil is blacker with the composted grass. There's no way my back will cooperate turning compost by hand now. No problem 50 years ago. If I had three times the space I'd buy a compact tractor and keep half in a clover alfalfa mix cover crop. Alfalfa puts down very deep roots that will become channels to allow water and air to go deeper and clover adds bulk organic to hold water during dry spells. Alfalfa will bring to the surface needed minerals from depths that possibly only asparagus may reach. It's time for round two. Cultivating today and side dressing cow peas and okra. Never planted sugar snap peas in the fall before but it might work for the premature stir fry pods. Nothing to lose. My grandfather had a luxury while market farming 3 acres I don't have. A mule with all the attachments. Memories.
Nice! I have to practice what I preach and that's to say, if you found something that works, stick with it, don't listen to others or tell others there's only 1 way or a better way of doing things.




Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
I have little green cherry tomatoes and bigger green Celebrities. Beet greens galore with beets nearly ready to pull.

I had made a mistake of not being careful about making compost this year so it was mostly nitrogen and tomatoes grown in it weren't doing anything except making leaves. Added bone meal and boy, are they happy now!
Speaking of compost.. pics coming in a bit
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Old 07-21-2017, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
183,840 posts, read 74,970,778 times
Reputation: 128835
I never took a photo of the huge Missouri compost pile from the 70's. Film was expensive. Large scale farmers need organic matter and what often referred to as green manure is a cover crop being plowed under to compost over the fall and early spring. I once had two different customers that row cropped farmed over 6,000 acres each. Those in a way are just scaled up veggie gardens. End result was corn flakes, tofu, cream of wheat. One thing I always hated about such large scale corn operations was farmers out of necessity use cheap anhydrous ammonia for needed nitrogen. Math in our veggie patch doesn't make or break me and the only veggie that we grow that requires very much nitrogen is sweet corn and for that I much prefer calcium nitrate. 15.5% nitrogen that actually will help our acidic soil. Not much clay in this soil for plant nutrients to for an ionic bond with until plants need them so the only alternative is organic matter to hold on to mineral salts until needed. Time to eat lunch and pull a 3rd shift.
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Old 07-21-2017, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
64,990 posts, read 47,303,288 times
Reputation: 10512
Just to keep my own compost updates threaded....


Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
April 26, 2017


In 5 months time can you tell the difference with my compost pile? November vs April.




Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
May 20, 2017

Turning the compost pile finally. Was getting matted, and flattened too much with little air inside it.


Nice and fluffed up now.






Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
Compost update: June 13, 2017.




And now.... July 21, 2017. Neighbor had fresh grass cut so decided to turn it and mix it...


6 new images! POSSIBLY A BIG MISTAKE MADE!






Decided to layer this time. No leaves around so cardboard will have to do for the browns.





Cardboard, Grass, Cardboard, then start mixing the compost soil on top with the grass. This way you get some worms on that level to work their way down and up.


And as I posted this I just realized the cardboard will cut off the circulation into the pile. I will experiment and report back. Its just 2 layers.





WATER with each layer. Especially being a heat wave now. Fires can easily be started.





Fluffed up. BTW .. I saw no food scraps older then 2 days in there. incredible how fast it breaks down when its hot!





Nice little volcano. Will measure temp inside later on or tomorrow. Ready to use now but I like it broken down more.





How about a close up? Lots of organic material in there! But you can see needs another month at least.


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