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Old 04-01-2009, 07:11 AM
 
Location: St. Louis
4,256 posts, read 1,259,173 times
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Question How to get rid of Ivy?

How do you get rid of ivy? We have tried cutting it, pulling it out, and it keeps coming back. Its covered any bushed that were in front of the house. We bought the house with the ivy already there and have been trying to redo the front of the house but cant because of the ivy! So is there a good way to do it or just keep pulling? And the picture is kinda what it looks like, but its a mixture of that and some other ivy/vines.
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How to get rid of Ivy?-variegated-ivy.jpe  
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Old 04-01-2009, 07:27 AM
 
Location: Virginia
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I've seen a few posts about ivy, and they're confusing to me. Ivy looks pretty to me, and seems harmless. Maybe it's because here's in Virginia it doesn't seem that easy to grow. I put some in my garden and it lived for the summer months, then died. I was actually hoping it would grow more, it looks like a nice ground cover to me.

Is it a problem in other states, or am I missing something? I don't see it everywhere or growing over bushes here (I live near Washington, D.C.). But... we do have kudzu. Now that's a problem.
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Old 04-01-2009, 07:35 AM
 
Location: Albemarle, NC
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Ivy is considered invasive in NC. It's all through the woods behind my house after being planted in the 70s.

You can spray it with Roundup. And spray it and spray it and spray it. That only helps a little. You will need to pull the roots out. Even a small piece will regrow, so do it when the soil is wet. Pull pull pull. Each year that you remove it, it will get easier the next year. Anytime you see a piece sprout, pull it.
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Old 04-01-2009, 07:45 AM
 
Location: St Thomas, US Virgin Islands
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Concur that RoundUp is the BEST! We have nasty suffocating vines here which grow like mad but are easily controllable with RU. Be sure to spray it on the leaves carefully, avoiding vegetation you don't want to kill. The plant will start to wilt in a couple of days and will usually be dead within a week - the chemical gets right into the root so kills that off as well. The already-prepared RoundUp is expensive but get the concentrate and dilute it yourself in a sprayer - much less expensive. Cheers!
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Old 04-01-2009, 07:45 AM
 
Location: A little suburb of Houston
3,701 posts, read 10,634,526 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FromVAtoNC View Post
I've seen a few posts about ivy, and they're confusing to me. Ivy looks pretty to me, and seems harmless. Maybe it's because here's in Virginia it doesn't seem that easy to grow. I put some in my garden and it lived for the summer months, then died. I was actually hoping it would grow more, it looks like a nice ground cover to me.

Is it a problem in other states, or am I missing something? I don't see it everywhere or growing over bushes here (I live near Washington, D.C.). But... we do have kudzu. Now that's a problem.
Argh! know this problem quite well. Ivy is lovely and harmless until it takes over and smothers everything else in your garden, then it seems unremovable. I tried and tried to get rid of the stuff. Poisons don't work because of the multiple root systems. Snow did not work (snow is a rarity around here). I got tired of pulling...there was just so much of it. I spent hours at it repeatedly to no effect. I finally hired a work crew to pull it all out so I could get it to a managable level and start pulling the ones that managed to grow back myself...that seems to have worked.

BTW, I had to sacrifice and/or cut back many plants to get rid of the stuff.That was bad, but on the other hand, it gave me a chance to redesign the garden.
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Old 04-01-2009, 08:10 AM
 
Location: St. Louis
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Here in St. Louis, ivy is invasive, it gets everywhere, sticks to the brick of the house, etc. But I dont mind pulling everything else up with it. We are wanting to redesign the front of the house. We bought the house that way almost two years ago and the vines had already taken over then and wont go away even when we pull! But I will try some roundup. Someones husband said to burn it but since its right next to the house I figure we'd burn the house down, too. And here we get snow but it grows anyways.
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Old 04-01-2009, 09:30 PM
 
Location: East Tennessee
821 posts, read 1,223,243 times
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when I bought my house years ago, it was all around the house and between the house and siding on the side of the house, I pulled and pulled it out between and kept pulling
finally after years of doing this, it's gone. Glad I can't see the damage it has done between the wall and siding of the house.
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Old 04-02-2009, 01:13 AM
 
Location: Pembroke, GA
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Get a goat. j/k. My grandmother's garden was covered with ivy. This is how we removed it: Cut the plant down to the roots and then use a foam brush to apply Round up. Pull up any seedlings that emerge, and because it grows from both seeds eaten by the birds and roots, just keep pulling any new ones. Eventually, you'll get rid of it.
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Old 04-02-2009, 07:43 AM
 
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The Moth Method:

First, get some electric hedge trimmers and cut swathes through the area of ivy you want to remove. Make straight cuts down to the ground about every 2 or 3 feet.

Then, get a broomstick and insert it under the ivy and 'lever' the vines up.

Then, its time to pull and pull. And pull some more.

After all that, you are left with lots of small stems or stubs of vines that can grow back. Be vigilant and keep yanking them out of the ground.

This all takes time.
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Old 04-02-2009, 08:03 AM
 
Location: St. Louis
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So no quick ways? Will we be able to plant anything in front of the house this summer? Or will whats growing back choke it out?
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