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Old 08-15-2009, 10:00 PM
 
Location: in my mind
2,745 posts, read 12,852,605 times
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I planted one packet of Morning Glory seeds along a fence, just to see what would happen. It was about a month ago, and to my surprise they're coming up nicely! I say this because I'm in San Antonio, TX and we have really difficult clay soil that almost always needs to be amended and doesn't drain well at all.

Do you think they'll survive and thrive in this soil or will there be problems as the plants mature? I want to know if it would be a waste of time to plant more along the same fence line. I have many packets of seeds and would love to have the Morning Glories cover the fence if possible (it's chain link and ugly)... but I'd been holding off until I could do it "properly" (buy good soil to plant them in)... but if they'll make it in the clay then I just might go ahead with it.

I just get so tired of having to go out and BUY potting soil in order to plant anything in my yard. Sometimes I just want to PLANT without all that extra cost!
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Old 08-16-2009, 04:03 AM
 
Location: rain city
2,956 posts, read 11,042,170 times
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There isn't much that will defeat a morning glory. They'll grow anywhere.

They will also re-seed themselves copiously. You won't need to plant them again next year.

But if the seeds you planted are a hybrid cultivar, chances are reseeding themselves over time, they will revert to their original morninggloriness, probably Heavenly Blue.
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Old 08-16-2009, 06:18 AM
 
Location: In a house
21,902 posts, read 20,895,074 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fierce_flawless View Post
I planted one packet of Morning Glory seeds along a fence, just to see what would happen. It was about a month ago, and to my surprise they're coming up nicely! I say this because I'm in San Antonio, TX and we have really difficult clay soil that almost always needs to be amended and doesn't drain well at all.

Do you think they'll survive and thrive in this soil or will there be problems as the plants mature? I want to know if it would be a waste of time to plant more along the same fence line. I have many packets of seeds and would love to have the Morning Glories cover the fence if possible (it's chain link and ugly)... but I'd been holding off until I could do it "properly" (buy good soil to plant them in)... but if they'll make it in the clay then I just might go ahead with it.

I just get so tired of having to go out and BUY potting soil in order to plant anything in my yard. Sometimes I just want to PLANT without all that extra cost!
If the soil there is anything like the soil/clay in NC then you can't do much to harm Morning Glories. The biggest problem is keeping them confined to one area. They will take over if not carefully maintained. Not only do they reseed but the roots spread underground so there never seems to be a shortage of them!
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Old 08-16-2009, 06:39 AM
 
Location: Albemarle, NC
7,730 posts, read 12,446,984 times
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They grow best in poor soil. The common name of the native type is bindweed. Usually red or white, they take over everything. Depending on the variety, as already stated, yours may revert to the original kind. The blue is very nice. The red has tiny flowers, but the white is large and spreads very quickly through reseeding.
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Old 08-16-2009, 07:45 AM
 
18,107 posts, read 16,448,492 times
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This clematis gets a bad name, but its a personal favorite of mine. The orange blossom clematis seems to do well in poor soil. At least it comes up in the lawn and does well with little attention. It is invasive, so keep an eye on it. I've seen some brushy areas on a nearby mountain drive covered in it. I have it in the trellis with other clematis and morning glories.
It's a late summer/fall blooming white flowering vine that smells like orange blossom.
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Old 08-16-2009, 04:46 PM
 
Location: in my mind
2,745 posts, read 12,852,605 times
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Thanks everyone. I think I planted white?? I don't know. I had purchased several packets of seeds and just picked one at random to see if it would grow before bothering with the others. I know I still have packets of white, red, blue, and some "moonflower" as well.

I have a LOT of chain link fence I'm trying to cover quickly so I am glad to hear it will probably do well!

I haven't investigated clematis yet. I need to learn more about what to plant when so that I can keep the fence covered year round, as opposed to having periods where it's covered in dead/brown.
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Old 08-16-2009, 05:48 PM
 
Location: rain city
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I lived and gardened and worked in the nursery business in Texas for years. I had a property with 250 linear feet of chain link fence in the front I wanted to cover.

On the portion closest to the house, probably half of the length of the fence, I planted climbing heirloom roses of several kinds. In ten years time no portion of that ugly fence could be seen and my roses were a glory.

At the far end of the fence away from the house I planted eastern red cedar (juniperus virginiana). I bought them from the county agricultural extension service as seedlings, about a foot tall, for $12 a bundle. It took them about 2 years to really take off, but after ten years they had grown together in a hedge and hid the fence completely.

I also had a smattering of passion vine, scarlett runner bean (re-seeding annual), and hybrid honeysuckle.
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Old 08-18-2009, 02:22 PM
 
Location: in my mind
2,745 posts, read 12,852,605 times
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Thanks azoria!

I do love the passion vine, but haven't planted any. Saw it covering a huge fence at a nursery and I was smitten!

I am trying to get as much coverage as possible in the shortest amount of time... since we want to sell in a year or so and move.

I just looked today and the morning glory I planted is starting to climb the fence and I see the beginnings of buds. So exciting! I will go ahead and plant the rest of the seeds I have, I think.
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Old 08-18-2009, 02:39 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,165 posts, read 57,288,199 times
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Morning glories will grow anywhere. You plant them once, and you're set for life. And every summer I get a nice surprise, because they bloom a different color every year.

I planted them in the lawn to cover a fence, and they survive even the lawn mower. Then they drifted over to the compost heap, where they disguise it in the summer and contribute to it in the winter. They're also in my neighbor's yard (which she's not happy about, but ... oh well ... )

It's a PITA to tear out the dead vines after the frost, but they may or may not die off where you are.
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Old 08-18-2009, 02:46 PM
 
Location: in my mind
2,745 posts, read 12,852,605 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Morning glories will grow anywhere. You plant them once, and you're set for life. And every summer I get a nice surprise, because they bloom a different color every year.

I planted them in the lawn to cover a fence, and they survive even the lawn mower. Then they drifted over to the compost heap, where they disguise it in the summer and contribute to it in the winter. They're also in my neighbor's yard (which she's not happy about, but ... oh well ... )

It's a PITA to tear out the dead vines after the frost, but they may or may not die off where you are.
Yeah it remains to be seen. I'm in zone 9 (I think) but I'm close to downtown and I forget what that's called but it is always a bit warmer. All of the things I assumed would die last winter didn't. Even some things I didn't cover up or try to protect at all. I was very shocked!

These will probably wander to the neighbors' too, but on one side it can ONLY be an improvement, if you know what I mean, and on the other, well no one lives there and I think she'll sell eventually. No one is around to care!
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