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Old 09-03-2009, 08:21 AM
 
Location: Rhody
369 posts, read 1,146,716 times
Reputation: 231

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After reading an incredible book called "the Pruning Guide" written in 1912! The best pruning and plant guide I've ever read- leave it to the old school.

So: you let the first year canes grow to 4 feet or so and in that summer (not too late) you head them back to about 3 1/2 feet which will force the lateral side canes to grow out for the remainder of the summer, and is where most of the berries will grow -next summer.

I believe you can still do a light pruning during the winter or early spring if anything gets too long. Another advantage is that heading them back in the first growing year also makes the main cane nice and strong.

I've done a lot of research, online, and in older books but never really found one that explained it this way. Thought I'd share.
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Old 09-03-2009, 11:37 AM
 
3,750 posts, read 10,203,909 times
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While I'm not growing raspberries - I appreciate the heads up about a good pruning guide - we could use one for all our various shrubs/trees that will need some attention!
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Old 09-03-2009, 11:50 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
1,142 posts, read 2,451,204 times
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I wish I had known that when I first got my raspberry bushes! But we did cut back a lot last year and got tons of fruit this year so maybe I kind of lucked out and cut back the right way. At least I hope so!

Thanks for the information!
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Old 09-04-2009, 02:59 PM
 
357 posts, read 848,607 times
Reputation: 202
wonder if this practice applied to Blackberries also.

Quote:
Originally Posted by terrasurf View Post
After reading an incredible book called "the Pruning Guide" written in 1912! The best pruning and plant guide I've ever read- leave it to the old school.

So: you let the first year canes grow to 4 feet or so and in that summer (not too late) you head them back to about 3 1/2 feet which will force the lateral side canes to grow out for the remainder of the summer, and is where most of the berries will grow -next summer.

I believe you can still do a light pruning during the winter or early spring if anything gets too long. Another advantage is that heading them back in the first growing year also makes the main cane nice and strong.

I've done a lot of research, online, and in older books but never really found one that explained it this way. Thought I'd share.
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Old 09-04-2009, 03:03 PM
 
Location: South Bay Native
13,048 posts, read 21,158,596 times
Reputation: 22514
Can you check your book for pruning apricot trees? I live in southern CA, and have a fairly mature tree, but it hasn't been pruned for years and the productivity is waning because of it.

I am delighted about the raspberry advice, as I plan to add to our garden next spring! The guy at Home Depot garden dept told me to come in April, that's the only time they get them and they sell out fast.
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Old 09-05-2009, 06:42 PM
 
Location: Rhody
369 posts, read 1,146,716 times
Reputation: 231
Ok, I see the book actually has some info specific to California fruit trees, so I'm will look it over and get back.
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Old 09-05-2009, 07:13 PM
 
Location: most beautiful place ever
1,836 posts, read 3,481,170 times
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my raspberry bush stopped producing raspberries even though i prune it. maybe i prune it the wrong time of year. weird thing is years ago, several pricker bushes started growing around it. so now i dont know which is which.
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Old 09-07-2009, 07:19 AM
 
Location: Rhody
369 posts, read 1,146,716 times
Reputation: 231
Lots of apricot info: Apricots bear fruit on new and old growth, and are treated much as plums and peaches in terms of pruning. In general, if the overall tree is doing poorly, it will benefit from heavy pruning. If overall growth is good, will benefit from pruning 1/3 to 1/4 of new growth (heading back the tips, keeping the plant in check, thinning out interior branches), annually. This is done in winter or early spring, during the dormant season.

Now here's what it writes about California: "in the great interior valley section of California, it is customary to prune all trees except almonds and walnuts, very heavily late in winter. With peach, apricot, and plum trees all of the new growth is cut off, except stubs, 6-12 inches long".

This is from "the Pruning Manual" written by L.H. Bailey, 1898. The Dean of American Horticulture, founder of agricultural extension in America, and founder of Cornell's Horticulture program.

And btw, blackberries can be treated just like raspberries. Good luck.
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Old 09-07-2009, 08:47 AM
 
Location: Happy wherever I am - Florida now
3,359 posts, read 10,633,860 times
Reputation: 3812
Here's what I noticed with my berry bushes. If I did a good job of picking all the berries one summer, they would produce more and better fruit the next year.

When I sold the house the new occupants didn't pick and they got no fruit at all the next year and none after that either.
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Old 09-09-2009, 11:53 AM
 
Location: South Bay Native
13,048 posts, read 21,158,596 times
Reputation: 22514
Quote:
Originally Posted by terrasurf View Post
Lots of apricot info: Apricots bear fruit on new and old growth, and are treated much as plums and peaches in terms of pruning. In general, if the overall tree is doing poorly, it will benefit from heavy pruning. If overall growth is good, will benefit from pruning 1/3 to 1/4 of new growth (heading back the tips, keeping the plant in check, thinning out interior branches), annually. This is done in winter or early spring, during the dormant season.

Now here's what it writes about California: "in the great interior valley section of California, it is customary to prune all trees except almonds and walnuts, very heavily late in winter. With peach, apricot, and plum trees all of the new growth is cut off, except stubs, 6-12 inches long".

This is from "the Pruning Manual" written by L.H. Bailey, 1898. The Dean of American Horticulture, founder of agricultural extension in America, and founder of Cornell's Horticulture program.

And btw, blackberries can be treated just like raspberries. Good luck.
This is great info - I tried to rep but I can't yet. Thanks!
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