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Old 03-08-2010, 12:29 PM
 
Location: NC, USA
7,089 posts, read 8,037,756 times
Reputation: 3822
Well, in the shrub category, I planted two sprigs of Rosemary a few years back, the largest is over 3 ft tall and more than 4 ft in diameter, a nice aromatic yard addition.
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Old 03-08-2010, 03:05 PM
 
7,407 posts, read 10,444,393 times
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Japanese Cedars (Yoshino) are reasonably priced, look good, and grow pretty fast. I have grown several in Zone 7B.
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Old 03-14-2010, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Tropical state of mind
5,100 posts, read 8,169,062 times
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Thank you to everyone for the info! I've got a weekend off for a change, so I'll start looking around to see what I can find!
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Old 03-14-2010, 07:07 PM
 
11,962 posts, read 7,264,627 times
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Mrs I'm not sure how reliable this nursery is because I've not done business with them and some consumer complaints are showing up online. They claim this is the fastest growing hedge and the price tag is really low considering the square area of coverage you're talking about...
Siberian Elm, 1/2' - Ulmus Pumilla
Siberian elm (ulmus pulmila) is apparently a tree and also a hedge for zones 4-9 with the added bonus of drought resistant. Evergreen canadian hemlock (tsuga canadesis) hedges also appear to be very dense rated zone 3-7. Are you aware of which plants would be toxic to livestock? Honeysuckle tends to act like an economical thicket (even if not evergreen) but I'm not sure if that might be a source of digestive upset for sensitive animals.
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Old 03-17-2010, 08:53 AM
 
Location: Tropical state of mind
5,100 posts, read 8,169,062 times
Reputation: 5498
Quote:
Originally Posted by harborlady View Post
Mrs I'm not sure how reliable this nursery is because I've not done business with them and some consumer complaints are showing up online. They claim this is the fastest growing hedge and the price tag is really low considering the square area of coverage you're talking about...
Siberian Elm, 1/2' - Ulmus Pumilla
Siberian elm (ulmus pulmila) is apparently a tree and also a hedge for zones 4-9 with the added bonus of drought resistant. Evergreen canadian hemlock (tsuga canadesis) hedges also appear to be very dense rated zone 3-7. Are you aware of which plants would be toxic to livestock? Honeysuckle tends to act like an economical thicket (even if not evergreen) but I'm not sure if that might be a source of digestive upset for sensitive animals.
Thanks - I'll look at those too!

I'm not sure what's toxic off the top of my head, but on page one a very wonderful posted gave me some links that list them. I'll compare this to the list!
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Old 03-17-2010, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Tropical state of mind
5,100 posts, read 8,169,062 times
Reputation: 5498
Quote:
Originally Posted by harborlady View Post
Mrs I'm not sure how reliable this nursery is because I've not done business with them and some consumer complaints are showing up online. They claim this is the fastest growing hedge and the price tag is really low considering the square area of coverage you're talking about...
Siberian Elm, 1/2' - Ulmus Pumilla
Siberian elm (ulmus pulmila) is apparently a tree and also a hedge for zones 4-9 with the added bonus of drought resistant. Evergreen canadian hemlock (tsuga canadesis) hedges also appear to be very dense rated zone 3-7. Are you aware of which plants would be toxic to livestock? Honeysuckle tends to act like an economical thicket (even if not evergreen) but I'm not sure if that might be a source of digestive upset for sensitive animals.
There's a nursery less than an hour from me that sells 4-5' trees for $1 each - but only to 'the trade'. It says specifically on their site 'ONLY' so I'm guessing there is no way they'd sell me a hundred of them.

Although my neighbor's uncle owns a nursery. I wonder if he'd buy them.... I"ll have to check their site for some of the others suggested and see if they have those too. Would be nice to grab like 25 plants from 4 or 5 varieties......
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Old 03-12-2013, 07:05 PM
 
1 posts, read 629 times
Reputation: 10
has anyone planted the norway spruce? i have 12 acres and the land behind me and to one side of me sold to a developer and now is destroying all the trees around us. I planted norway spruces every 10 feet on one side with a few green giants in front of them. I hope i picked the right tree? i live in edmond ok, zone 7. any thoughts?
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Old 03-13-2013, 07:49 AM
 
2,065 posts, read 3,040,370 times
Reputation: 2544
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiro19000 View Post
has anyone planted the norway spruce? i have 12 acres and the land behind me and to one side of me sold to a developer and now is destroying all the trees around us. I planted norway spruces every 10 feet on one side with a few green giants in front of them. I hope i picked the right tree? i live in edmond ok, zone 7. any thoughts?
I'm glad you included your more exact location since zones alone don't always tell the whole conditions you are dealing with. If you had asked before picking a tree for privacy I would have suggested something like the Nellie R Stevens Holly or the Japanese Cedar (Cryptomeria Radicans). Since they are already planted the best I can say is read up on their care and keep the well watered during their establishment period over the first few years. Here's a quick quote from an expert on plains gardening for the Missouri Botanical Gardens (specific to Oklahoma):



Quote:
A good location, good yet well-drained soil, and good watering habits are key to growing norway spruce this far out on the great plains. Even then, I would be lying if I told you there are ancient specimens of norway spruce growing in Oklahoma County. Here are some helpful suggestions for those who are going to grow them here: [1] Plant in a location that gets shade from 12-4pm on summer afternoons and is protected from southwest summer winds. [2] DO NOT plant against a building or fence. The heat bouncing off the hard surface will only make this plant suffer. [3] Plant in good, but well drained soil. If your soils are heavy clay, plant this specimen on a berm or in a built up area. [4] Provide supplemental water during the heat of summer. Keep the soil lightly moist, but certainly not wet. I know this seems like a lot of stringent rules, but then you paid a lot of money for this plant…. why not give it the best effort you can to see it succeed.
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Old 03-14-2013, 07:03 AM
 
Location: (Orginally From Ann Arbor, MI) Now reside in Evans, Georgia
537 posts, read 487,933 times
Reputation: 278
I planted 6 Green Giant" Thuja on the side of my house in 2011 they were a foot tall then I planted them..they are now 10 feet high and were heading into the new growing season. On average they grew 4 feet a year for me.

Bamboo is another I personally like. Evergreens are great for reducing noise, reducing snow, and screening all year long, and creating a living fence. Rose of Sharon is fast and can be a hedge also. Flowers are pretty and attract lots of hummingbirds, and butterflies. ***** willow is another option.

I tend to 'layer' my living fences with evergreens, flowering shrubs, or grasses, then tall flowers etc
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