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Old 12-11-2010, 12:59 PM
 
Location: I'm around here someplace :)
3,633 posts, read 4,251,226 times
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well maybe it's not unusual, but I've never heard of it before:

what if, when you begin digging into your ancestry, you find you have an additional race that you didn't know about before?
I see it as positive, and cool, but am not really sure how to react and/or how it affects me.

was wondering if anyone else here has had this experience, or opinions even if you haven't experienced it yourself.
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Old 12-11-2010, 01:52 PM
 
Location: Dalton Gardens
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I have actually had this happen and I consider it to be an exciting and fascinating addition to the family history. Embrace it and enjoy the added richness of your genetics
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Old 12-11-2010, 11:17 PM
 
Location: Little Rock AR USA
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I suspect if we dig deep enough most of us will find the same thing, but, some will deny it and get hostile if it is mentioned. Another interesting find is to find you have half-siblings you didn't know about.
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Old 12-11-2010, 11:34 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...
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It's not unusual and the further you go back, especially the times of slavery, you may run into many interesting relationships.
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Old 12-12-2010, 12:30 AM
 
Location: Center of the universe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tia 914 View Post
well maybe it's not unusual, but I've never heard of it before:

what if, when you begin digging into your ancestry, you find you have an additional race that you didn't know about before?
I see it as positive, and cool, but am not really sure how to react and/or how it affects me.

was wondering if anyone else here has had this experience, or opinions even if you haven't experienced it yourself.
Man, do I have stories about that. I found out that my dad, who I thought was pretty much totally West African, was actually substantially German plus other lines from all over the British Isles and other parts of Europe and that a woman of German origin whom I went to high school with was actually a cousin.
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Old 12-12-2010, 09:45 AM
 
11,427 posts, read 19,438,504 times
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I'd like to think I'd just find it cool or merely factual... but I won't really know until it happens. I say that because I found out a 3rd great grandfather died a Civil War POW in Georgia and I was positively gutted by this knowledge.

This is long after I found a cousin who had died in WW1, in the States... I was newer to Genealogy at that point and I was excited to find him. He was actually who spurred me to keep on looking.

A lot of it would be based on what was going on in my life at the time, and whatever I could dig up on the person I found that was a different race.
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Old 12-12-2010, 10:51 AM
 
Location: I'm around here someplace :)
3,633 posts, read 4,251,226 times
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well, I'd started with my great-grandfather and worked my way backward... like "his parents were," and "their parents were," etc., and traced the direct line all the way back to this person: (this is c/p from http://www.earlyamerica.com/review/winter96/slavery.html): (broken link)

the very next year an African named Edward Mozingo successfully sued the man to whom he had been indentured for twenty eight years, being declared " free to all Intents and Purposes.


the odd thing about it is while my great-grandfather, who died before I was born, used to describe himself as "Cherokee-Colored," nobody could figure out what he meant
(this was decades before 'political correctness,' when 'colored' was considered a civilized, decent term).

so, as I inherited my father's "Southern wit," I describe myself as "vanilla chocolate and strawberry, on a bagel" (white, Native American, Black, Jewish)

(I truly hope that terminology doesn't offend anyone)
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Old 12-12-2010, 01:16 PM
 
Location: God's Gift to Mankind for flying anything
5,162 posts, read 10,472,822 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tia 914 View Post
(I truly hope that terminology doesn't offend anyone)
If it does ...
So what ?
There will always be people who think they are better than their neighbour ...
Sad ...
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Old 12-12-2010, 05:51 PM
 
Location: Center of the universe
24,757 posts, read 32,896,894 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tia 914 View Post
well, I'd started with my great-grandfather and worked my way backward... like "his parents were," and "their parents were," etc., and traced the direct line all the way back to this person: (this is c/p from http://www.earlyamerica.com/review/winter96/slavery.html): (broken link)

the very next year an African named Edward Mozingo successfully sued the man to whom he had been indentured for twenty eight years, being declared " free to all Intents and Purposes.


the odd thing about it is while my great-grandfather, who died before I was born, used to describe himself as "Cherokee-Colored," nobody could figure out what he meant
(this was decades before 'political correctness,' when 'colored' was considered a civilized, decent term).

so, as I inherited my father's "Southern wit," I describe myself as "vanilla chocolate and strawberry, on a bagel" (white, Native American, Black, Jewish)

(I truly hope that terminology doesn't offend anyone)
There is a very interesting story about that family written by your cousin Joe Mozingo in the LA Times. One day he started wondering how he, a person who appeared to be white, had a surname that Africans said was from Africa. So he dug and dug and dug and found out that his ancestors way back were indeed African.
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Old 12-12-2010, 06:26 PM
 
Location: I'm around here someplace :)
3,633 posts, read 4,251,226 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucario View Post
There is a very interesting story about that family written by your cousin Joe Mozingo in the LA Times. One day he started wondering how he, a person who appeared to be white, had a surname that Africans said was from Africa. So he dug and dug and dug and found out that his ancestors way back were indeed African.
yes, I know. after reading his story I sent him an email, but never heard back.
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