U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Genealogy
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-23-2011, 04:04 AM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
11,544 posts, read 24,522,661 times
Reputation: 6147

Advertisements

I think if you are talking about the Native American the first thing to learn is how to ask the right questions. It is a hard lesson to learn.

Maple syrup and honey are pure. An undiluted blood line is not pure. It is "full blood" or about 10 generations. My 10th gerneration ancestor was borm in 1645. I think the problem with Indian records is there is no written documentation. It was symbols; it was word of mouth from generation to generation. And perhaps much was destroyed.

I believe that many of the American Indians came from Canada. Sub-tribes of the Algonquin Nation settled in the Midwest and at leart one tribe that I am aware of settled in NE Oklahoma, and today is part of the Nine Tribes with headquarters in MIami. I believe descendants of this trabe may have moved to Arizona. Conversely many of the Native Americans who survived the Trail of Tears and settled in Talequah (Two is enough.) Oklahoma were from some of the southern states. Part of this group was Cherokee, but I do not know if other tribes were included in this wholesale cleansing of the south. .

I hope my Indian friends will forgive me for not knowing the proper names and proper protocol. I am still in-training. There are some events in history that are so ugly there is no 'easy' nor politically correct words to describe these horrific events. .

Last edited by linicx; 02-23-2011 at 04:13 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-23-2011, 06:40 AM
 
Location: Owasso, OK
1,224 posts, read 3,281,637 times
Reputation: 1108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fullback32 View Post
The IHS...yep it's better than nothing, but as I have stated in other threads, if the Federal government is blowing it for around two million NDNs, what in the world makes people think they can get it right for the entire country? Be careful of what you ask for. Different discussion though.

The bolded stated you made is an important one. I'm glad this discussion is happening, because what many Americans do not realize is that the whole benefits thing is highly overstated and also very tribal specific (I know you get it Milleka as you are one). The are so many variables that go into it from treaty agreements, to whether a tribal member lives on tribal land, to how well a tribe's casinos are doing (if they even have one and most of the really aren't doing all that well BTW), to what services each individual Nation provides. It kind of goes back to a premise of mine that while most Americans think of us an Indians...we think of ourselves as Comanches, Kiowas, Cherokees, Lakotas, Navajos and so on.

The Red Kennedy's?...aaayyyee.
Absolutely. There really is a difference among tribes. And some tribes still hold onto negative feelings against each other from feuds from over 100 years ago. I wish we had more "Native" education in this country. I think it would help people to understand a little better. Some individual states are better at this than others. But I know, here in Ok, I had an option in the 7th grade for taking Indian Studies as an elective. I don't even know that they do that anymore.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2011, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
11,544 posts, read 24,522,661 times
Reputation: 6147
It should not be an elective in any school. It should be a mandatiory part of the general education nationwide. Customs vary from tribe to tribe and so do feuds. There is so much more to Native American history than the Little Big Horn I was taught too many years ago. That was in 11th grade US History class. It was more important to learn the Preamble to the Constitution than it was to learn America's history - good and bad.
Realistically tne Indinas have a had short shrift from Uncle Sam rom day one to this day.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Milleka View Post
Absolutely. There really is a difference among tribes. And some tribes still hold onto negative feelings against each other from feuds from over 100 years ago. I wish we had more "Native" education in this country. I think it would help people to understand a little better. Some individual states are better at this than others. But I know, here in Ok, I had an option in the 7th grade for taking Indian Studies as an elective. I don't even know that they do that anymore.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2011, 08:33 PM
 
Location: Southeast Missouri
5,812 posts, read 15,953,270 times
Reputation: 3315
We went to Cahokia Mounds as part of our vacation last year. It was really interesting.

We didn't have much Native American education in school, especially in the later grades.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2011, 08:36 PM
 
7,497 posts, read 8,972,660 times
Reputation: 7394
Last I heard they were around 1% of the population, maybe less than that now.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2011, 09:00 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
3,334 posts, read 5,019,354 times
Reputation: 2026
Quote:
Originally Posted by linicx View Post
I believe that many of the American Indians came from Canada. Sub-tribes of the Algonquin Nation settled in the Midwest and at leart one tribe that I am aware of settled in NE Oklahoma, and today is part of the Nine Tribes with headquarters in MIami. I believe descendants of this trabe may have moved to Arizona. Conversely many of the Native Americans who survived the Trail of Tears and settled in Talequah (Two is enough.) Oklahoma were from some of the southern states. Part of this group was Cherokee, but I do not know if other tribes were included in this wholesale cleansing of the south. .

I hope my Indian friends will forgive me for not knowing the proper names and proper protocol. I am still in-training. There are some events in history that are so ugly there is no 'easy' nor politically correct words to describe these horrific events. .
You're doing fine

You know, we all came from somewhere. For instance, my Comanche people are actually an offshoot of the Shoshone people from the Wyoming area. There are stories about how this band of Shoshone headed south and ended up in Texas and became the Comanche. The stories differ depending if your listening to Comanches or anthropologists, but the fact that we are Shoshonean people doesn't change. Our language is pretty much the same with some slight dialectal differences such as you would find between American and British English. There is an annual gathering of Comanche and Shoshone to celebrate our common roots.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-26-2011, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Pacific Northwest
166 posts, read 333,745 times
Reputation: 210
I suspect those of you that hasn't see an FBI has never been to a reservation. I'm 1/4 Lakhota and I've meet many FBI's on the rez and as well as off. That is where most FBI's are, that is the only place were we can be with our own. I'm also 3/4 Irish.

Most people applying for CDIB can't just say they are Indian and you get the card. You have to have parents that are enrolled. Our nation you have to have one parent enrolled and you have to be 1/2 Lakhota. Some tribes are less strict. The blood quantum is mostly the white man's invention.

Last edited by Masika; 02-26-2011 at 06:19 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2011, 05:34 PM
 
49 posts, read 46,365 times
Reputation: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by mr bolo View Post
Ive never met a full blooded native american in my entire life, most people that claim to be are usually mixed with whites or hispanic, etc

are there any surviving full blooded natives left or are they all mixed or partial race now?

they seem like they are almost extinct?
I wonder how many First Nation in Canada are full blood Native and how many are not.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2011, 06:03 PM
 
Location: Destrehan, Louisiana
2,192 posts, read 5,909,640 times
Reputation: 3588
Quote:
Originally Posted by mr bolo View Post
Ive never met a full blooded native american in my entire life, most people that claim to be are usually mixed with whites or hispanic, etc

are there any surviving full blooded natives left or are they all mixed or partial race now?

they seem like they are almost extinct?

I would say none and there never was because we all came over from Africa thousands of years ago.

busta
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2011, 11:45 AM
 
959 posts, read 1,070,241 times
Reputation: 363
Where I live most people who claim to be Spanish look Native American, while most people who claim to be Native American look White, lol.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Genealogy
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top