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Old 02-02-2012, 07:54 AM
 
Location: Edmond, OK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
It kind of annoys me when people think of mixing as only being between races. Mixing between different nationalities is in a way 'interracial' since ethnic groups are separated by degrees.
Again, as others have mentioned, maybe that's because Australian immigration is newer. Most of my ancestors have been in the US since the early 1800's, with some here since before independence. Honestly, most white people I know don't really pay any attention to where their ancestors came from, other than a passing curiosity. Maybe too its because we live in the western part of the US where it's different than the east coast. There aren't Italian, Irish, whatever neighborhoods. It's not where most immigrants originally settled, well except for people from Mexico, Central and South America. When they moved west and settled the different areas, I suspect there wasn't a lot of potential mates to choose from. They couldn't afford to be so selective. Now, we're just Americans.

My husband and I were married for more than 20 years before we did any looking into our ancestry. We knew his surname as well as his moms maiden name were both British, and we knew that my maiden name, as well as my mom's maiden name were both Irish, and that one of my grandfathers was 1/8 Native American, but beyond that, no one knew or really cared. My parents have been married over 50 years and they couldn't tell you much anything about it. Hubby and I figured we were pretty much of some European descent simply because we are both very fair skinned, light hair and blue eyes, but far all we knew were Swedish. One of my grandfather had begun to research our ancestry a few years before he died, and just recently I was given what he came up with, and an aunt on the other side of my family had done some research as well. I also was just given all of her stuff, and have not even looked through it all yet. No telling what I might find.

 
Old 02-02-2012, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Whiteville Tennessee
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My family is Irish. Both sides of the family. My childrens mother is Irish. My sisters all married Irish lads. 2 of my daughters are married to Irish lads and my other daughter is engaged to an Irish lad. So I guess we are not mutts. If I were ever to marry a non Irish it would be to a certain Polish girl up in Indiana!!!!!!!
 
Old 02-02-2012, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Southeast Missouri
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Most of my ancestors were English, Irish, Scottish, and Welsh. I think I have some German in me, too. Some of my ancestors also had Native American features, though I can't pinpoint any specific Native American ancestor in my family tree. One of my ancestors was supposedly married on a Native American reservation.
 
Old 02-02-2012, 10:09 AM
 
Location: Toronto
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
It kind of annoys me when people think of mixing as only being between races. Mixing between different nationalities is in a way 'interracial' since ethnic groups are separated by degrees.
Visual Science - The Genetic Map of Europe - NYTimes.com
 
Old 02-02-2012, 10:39 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
How rare is it to have 'pure' or predominant British ancestry? I assume that's confined mostly to certain regions, like New England and say Utah? If your last name is say Smith, I suppose it's pretty likely you're not even 50% English?
I am American and have studied demographics all my long life.

Actually, the 3-state upper New England region has many of Quebec French ancestry along with British, and a limited number of Italians and Irish. The other 3 states of lower New England region are extremely diverse, full of Italians, Irish, Quebecers, Portuguese, Syrians, Jews, Poles, Hispanics (although the region's town and place names remain very English-sounding). Utah as you said, seems to have a mostly British and Danish-descended population (many Mormon migrants in the 1800s came from Denmark) although like everywhere, more Hispanic immigrants are filtering in.

A better example of a region where the White population is of nearly all British or Scots-Irish ancestry (with lesser amounts of early Huguenot French and German Luthern ancestry like Dale Earnhart) would be all of the U.S. SOUTHERN (that is, southeastern) states (except Florida, Texas, and Louisiana which are more diverse than all the other southern states). The southern Appalachian mountain region prides itself on Scots-Irish folk music and traditions, the annual Highland Gathering at Grandfather Mountain, etc.
 
Old 02-02-2012, 10:41 AM
 
Location: southern california
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u cant go by what americans say they are. they lie alot and cover up bek 50 years ago parents would all tell their kids they came over on mayflower so they would blend in better.
u gota get DNA test to find our who u r.
most americans have not done it.
 
Old 02-02-2012, 10:42 AM
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Location: Western Massachusetts
45,740 posts, read 39,621,992 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
In Australia a good majority of people (well around 60% is my own guess) are 100% English, Scottish, Irish or a mix of the three. That's probably the most common situation, although mixes with other groups such as Italians are certainly pretty common.

But when look at demographic statistics, and the ancestries of say celebrities, it seems the majority of Americans have at least 4-5, often 6-7+ European ethnic groups in their ancestries. Of course in 1900 neither Germany or Italy existed as independent nations, but their ancestors came from those regions.

Do you think this gives Americans a more continental European look than say Australians? A lot of Australians basically look just like the British because they are. Not all are even tanned. I think that's why I personally notice that Americans often have a certain physical look that is different from a lot of white Australians.

How rare is it to have 'pure' or predominant British ancestry? I assume that's confined mostly to certain regions, like New England and say Utah? If your last name is say Smith, I suppose it's pretty likely you're not even 50% English?
Americans don't look that British to me; there's no reason they should. I've noticed Canadians look a bit more British. Red hair, light colored eyes are much more common in the UK than in the USA. I read that light colored eyes were much more common in the 1930s in the US than today among whites. After mixing between "white ethnics" and the older more British population light eyes became less common due to the gene for dark eyes being dominant over the gene for light eyes.

How "continental" Americans look depends greatly on region. I grew up in Long Island and the common ancestry was Italian (usually southern), followed by Jewish (usually via Eastern Europe) and then Irish. British descent was rare. Many people (esp those of Italian and Greek descent and some Jews) had jet black hair, tan skin (some even brown so some "whites" were darker than Hispanics). I'm a tan to light brown myself and I stood out among white people more in upstate NY than in Long Island (where I didn't really at all).

"Pure" British ancestry won't be that common in New England except maybe in parts of Northern New England (Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine); too many immigrants came to New England in the 19th century to work in the mills. New England has a large number of Italians, Portuguese and of course, Irish (do you count them as British?). Even Northern New England might not be the best as some parts have gotten an influx of people from southern New England and New York State. Northern New England also has a large French Canadian population.

The best place to find "pure" British ancestry would be in a place that few immigrants in the 19th and early 20th century and few Americans from other parts of the country moved to later on. Appalachia and parts of the deep south might be best. I read somewhere Kentucky has the highest percentage of British ancestry.
 
Old 02-02-2012, 10:47 AM
 
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Yes, I noticed this about Australians as well. A lot of them look particularly "british" to me..... narrow noses, etc...

americans tend to be more mixed. . even myself, I'm irish, french, german, and welsh.

Australians have had more of a british influence and more direct immigration from the UK. . . whereas the US has had continental european immigration...along with some UK immigration early on......
 
Old 02-02-2012, 10:54 AM
 
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btw, I love Australia's unique "britishness" though...

It's interesting. I watch shows like "summer heights high" and "angry boys" with Chris Lilley (who typifies the australian/british look) all the time. .

and notice how people look in those shows. for example the school girls in summer heights high....the farmer family that lives in "Dunt" on Angry Boys...

they all have this britishness about them.... light hair. narrow noses, light eyes.

White Australian children, in particular all seem to have that "surfer" look to them.... well, not all, but a lot do I noticed that... long, blonde "surfer" hair.. freckles (irishness?) light skin, tanned and freckled from the australin sun.
 
Old 02-02-2012, 11:41 AM
 
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I noticed the same thing about whites from the south and whites from New York and Nj.

The whites down south and in central Pa look more pale,with blond hair and light eyes,similiar to Taylor Swift while a lot of whites from Nj seem to resemble the cast of The Jersey Shore.
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