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Old 02-14-2012, 02:44 PM
Status: "happy again, no longer catless! t...." (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,421 posts, read 16,686,996 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by texdav View Post
It can depend to include wanting to not be known by name that had a bad past to like my mothers family that went fron Groff to Grove because they wanted a american name verus german name.I some older cases it can go bacj to what was record by immagration officals as some made the X only.I think its surprising how mnay in years past wanted a more american sounding name really for same reason they wanted their children to speak engish in houshold normally.
This isn't the case but there seem to be about five spellings which are scattered up and down the line, including the hits which came up in England. When I'm trying again to find any trace of my Grandmother's missing father, who is a 'smith', a lot of Schmitts come up too.
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Old 01-12-2013, 09:36 AM
 
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On my maternal grandmother's side some of the ancestors/relatives spelled their last name Abbott and others Abbot (with only "t").
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Old 01-14-2013, 06:07 PM
Status: "happy again, no longer catless! t...." (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,421 posts, read 16,686,996 times
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Five great grandfathers back there were twins born. They were named after the father and brother, but the father changed the spelling of the last name for the son named after him. Both had twin sons. Both named them after father and brother, but the son who's name was spelled different, changed the spelling of his son named after him to the origional spelling. For several generations more, there was a James and a William in each direct family and its tricky figuring out who belongs to whom.
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Old 01-14-2013, 06:32 PM
 
1,097 posts, read 1,658,700 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chava61 View Post
On my maternal grandmother's side some of the ancestors/relatives spelled their last name Abbott and others Abbot (with only "t").
My piece of Abbott's always used 2 't's :+) Where were yours?
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Old 01-14-2013, 06:39 PM
 
Location: Arizona
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And another one, with out going in to details.

When my ancestors got off the boat in America, a fourteen letter family name became one of six.

I still thank them to this day
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Old 01-15-2013, 01:36 AM
 
11,686 posts, read 13,083,410 times
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I knew three sisters whose parents were Polish, and each one had a different spelling of their surname. I wonder if the doctor didn't misspell it on their birth certificates.

I had a great-grandmother whose family was named Holleran, Halloran, O'Halloran. The problem seemed to be that the parents were illiterate and so were the older children, and it was amongst the older children that the surname variations evolved.

Finally, I met via email a woman who wrote a book that included a lot of information about my grt-grandfather, a Cornish missionary. Her name was so bizarre to me that I asked her if it was Cornish. It was, but it was also unique. The original surname had been Cornish, but in the past when the doctor had registered the birth of one of her male ancestors he assumed that the father's middle name was actually the first part of his surname; and the, thus, gave the child an original surname that was the father's middle name combined with his surname. And the child kept the name, and everyone with the name is related as it is unique.
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Old 01-15-2013, 07:28 AM
 
Location: CHicago, United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nitram View Post
Name variations were generally due to illiteracy, phonetic spelling or poor penmanship. Many people signed their names with an X and witnesses spelled it out for them whichever way they thought it should be spelled.
True. And for immigrants arriving in the USA, immigration agents occassionally changed the spelling of someone's name because they (the agent and the immigrant) couldn't communicate in the same language. Names were shortened, just one example.
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Old 01-15-2013, 11:57 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,084 posts, read 33,141,404 times
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Some times the spelling change came about because of how they thought people would respond to it as well. One of my distant relatives was a "Poortinga" when they arrived in the States from the Netherlands, but when he opened a store he didn't want "poor" on his sign and changed the spelling to Portinga and dropped one "o" from the name. Every once in a while someone will change the spelling back to the "oo" but not to often.
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Old 01-15-2013, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Pacific NW
6,415 posts, read 10,037,563 times
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Originally Posted by gomexico View Post
True. And for immigrants arriving in the USA, immigration agents occassionally changed the spelling of someone's name because they (the agent and the immigrant) couldn't communicate in the same language. Names were shortened, just one example.
That happened a lot less than people think. And it's really only since there became official "papers" for immigrants (1903). Before that, names might have been spelled wrongly on passenger lists, but that doesn't mean that became their "official" name. That's just how it was written down.
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Old 01-15-2013, 05:24 PM
 
Location: Wyoming
9,166 posts, read 16,519,971 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nightbird47 View Post
This isn't the case but there seem to be about five spellings which are scattered up and down the line, including the hits which came up in England. When I'm trying again to find any trace of my Grandmother's missing father, who is a 'smith', a lot of Schmitts come up too.
A great uncle of mine changed his name from "Schmidt" to "Smith" awhile after moving to South Dakota. Supposedly there were a lot of Smiths in the area and he got tired of correcting people on the spelling and pronunciation of his name. He finally gave up and changed it.
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