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Old 02-21-2012, 06:50 PM
 
9,454 posts, read 15,025,607 times
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I wonder why the Irish were usually looked down upon? I've seen old history books, sites, etc, with signs posted NO IRISH. Seems those signs were posted in places of employment, stores, restaurants, etc. What was the problem with them?

And outside of their accent, how could one tell, anyways? they all looked alike to me

I always thought I had some Irish blood, but my grandparents were quick to veto that notion. actually, in doing my family research, I find very little indication of any irish blood. I'm mostly German, about 1/4 Scottish. Still, I wonder why my grandparents were so opposed to even the idea? What was considered undesirable about the Irish?
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Old 02-21-2012, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Seattle
626 posts, read 1,085,017 times
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A large part of it is due to Catholicism. The English painted the Irish as an "inferior" race; Irish peasants were treated not much differently than slaves back in Ireland. So, it was their treatment of the Irish that rather set the stage.
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Old 02-21-2012, 10:38 PM
 
Location: Pacific NW
6,415 posts, read 10,039,435 times
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I get the impression (it's nothing that I definitively know), that in the 19th century, the Irish were viewed more-or-less as Hispanics are today. Because of things like the Potato famine, they came into the U.S. in large numbers, more as financial refugees. They took whatever jobs were available, usually the low-paying, manual labor. Which put them into the "lower class." Which makes them easier to have been singled-out and discriminated against. Especially on the eastern seaboard, where I feel like the class system was much more in play.
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Old 02-21-2012, 11:09 PM
 
Location: where people are either too stupid to leave or too stuck to move
3,998 posts, read 5,493,417 times
Reputation: 3618
i never understood this either
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Old 02-21-2012, 11:39 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
17,429 posts, read 3,547,315 times
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^^^ I agree... the Potato famine was totally devastating...many already downtrodden had to migrate for any kind of job for survival. So many families and crowded into small apts... fights, crime, then the whiskey and ale added a few problems, no doubt, along the way.



Quote:
Originally Posted by EnricoV View Post
I get the impression (it's nothing that I definitively know), that in the 19th century, the Irish were viewed more-or-less as Hispanics are today. Because of things like the Potato famine, they came into the U.S. in large numbers, more as financial refugees. They took whatever jobs were available, usually the low-paying, manual labor. Which put them into the "lower class." Which makes them easier to have been singled-out and discriminated against. Especially on the eastern seaboard, where I feel like the class system was much more in play.
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Old 02-21-2012, 11:51 PM
 
1,228 posts, read 1,501,375 times
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now they are well liked
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Old 02-22-2012, 06:33 AM
 
Location: Wisconsin
7,215 posts, read 7,569,518 times
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Most of it was sentiment perpetuated by the English during various times when they were trying to subjugate Ireland. Easy to do when the Irish had a different language, religion, and culture than most of England.
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Old 02-22-2012, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Wyoming
9,169 posts, read 16,524,951 times
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A poem on the base of the Statue of Liberty reads, in part:
"Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!"

These were the Irish immigrants of mid-19th century -- poor, huddled masses, seeking a life where they could make a living and even prosper. Most brought nothing of value with them. They were poor and had trouble finding decent jobs. Many were ill upon arrival after the long ocean voyage on over-crowed ships. They were the scum of New York City. They would be no more welcomed today than they were then.
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Old 02-22-2012, 09:28 AM
 
Location: Ka-nah-da
254 posts, read 471,894 times
Reputation: 336
Ignorance, stupidity and a superior attitude. The same things that continue today towards other nationalities....when will we ever learn
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Old 02-22-2012, 09:31 AM
 
Location: bold new city of the south
5,200 posts, read 4,109,217 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SUPERCHIC View Post
now they are well liked
Thank you.
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