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Old 11-03-2012, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Jacurutu
5,302 posts, read 4,009,391 times
Reputation: 601

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ArkansasSlim View Post
I think all this must be taken in proper context. As a hobby I locate and document with a 12+ page report with field and topo maps, photos, GPS location, description, and some times census, and send all to the Arkansas Archeological Survey to be entered into a data base at the University of Arkansas - Fayetteville. My friend and I have traveled all over Arkansas doing this in large, and unknown cemeteries and have been challenged only one time, and that was by a poaching deer hunter...
I think this sort of dedication is fabulous, it would be neat for grave markers to have an RFID or inconspicuous tag that could be scanned to provide online information. Sure, we've discussed how that derived data can be wrong (the Iowa WPA Graves being notable in that regard, when the participants doing the data collection weren't invented for accuracy), but through time it could be vetted better. In the future I can actually envision where all older census records are sourced together to index every single person on them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ArkansasSlim View Post
...And there is a law in Arkansas that states access must be permitted to visit any cemetery. Even if it is in a farmers cow pasture, behind locked gates, he must let you in if you ask. But a little common sense and courtesy is a given. Ask, don't demand and quote the law. It'll work every time. As a former property owner, if I was asked I would help as soon as possible, but if I was told, I would comply, but at my own sweet time!
This discussion is interesting to me for the fact that copying an online photograph of a grave marker from a site like "Find A Grave" seemingly violates more enforced laws (the copyright of the photographer) and societal structures than going to the location to take the picture yourself...
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Old 11-03-2012, 03:22 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,131 posts, read 26,246,015 times
Reputation: 6815
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grandpa Pipes View Post
Absurd or not if you trespass on ANY grave yard you better be willing to run in to legal trouble...........
That's an overly broad statement. Many cemeteries are owned by cities or counties and thus considered public places.
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Old 11-03-2012, 05:43 PM
 
Location: Little Rock AR USA
2,457 posts, read 6,087,640 times
Reputation: 1863
IBM, ref. RFID. I cannot find it at this moment but my daughter sent me a Link to a company that is making the little square do-hickeys (you see in magazines and newspapers) for tombstones. The ones you scan with your smart phone, and they will load any and all data you choose. There was a lengthy discussion in the Link Forum. It seems doable, but most comments were about the survivability of the company, then what.
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Old 11-03-2012, 06:01 PM
 
Location: Columbia, California
6,662 posts, read 25,329,136 times
Reputation: 5066
My wife and I live next door to a cemetery, we have two more within 100 yards. Most graves are from 1840 to 1900.
We walk in two of them for our morning walk. The Hebrew cemetery has locked gates, no doubt because of past vandalism.
We take pictures in the sunset of some tombstones to take advantage of the lighting, and in some cases the lightning.

My wife and I make a point of picking up trash on our walks. I have made a few repairs to some gates/fences around individual graves. With copper/brass prices up a lot of stuff gets stolen, the grave stones with bronze plaques have not been tampered with, yet. Hopefully the thieves will leave those alone.
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Old 11-03-2012, 10:29 PM
 
Location: Native Floridian, USA
4,896 posts, read 5,863,520 times
Reputation: 6050
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grandpa Pipes View Post
You've been very lucky.....so far. Graveyards are NOT public domain and as such require permission to even step foot on the grounds.

The right way photograph in a cemetery is to find either the sexton or the caretaker and get permission to photograph the grounds. Failing to do that means you are trespassing and get into a real jam if some damage is found after you visit even if you didn't do any damage.
Wow. I can't go into our local cemetary and take pictures of my relatives tombstones without permission .....? Or go to a cemetary in rural Alabama and take pictures of my Grandparents tombstones? There isn't even a fence around the cemetary that is on the church grounds....I would never go onto private land without permission. One of my grandmothers is buried on land that was owned by members of my family but, is now owned by someone else.

But your post astounds me. I have been in cemetaries all over the eastern seaboard and have yet to have to ask permission to enter the cemetary or permission to take pictures, excepting, as I said, a cemetary obviously fenced off on private land.
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Old 11-03-2012, 10:30 PM
 
Location: Jacurutu
5,302 posts, read 4,009,391 times
Reputation: 601
Quote:
Originally Posted by ArkansasSlim View Post
IBM, ref. RFID. I cannot find it at this moment but my daughter sent me a Link to a company that is making the little square do-hickeys (you see in magazines and newspapers) for tombstones. The ones you scan with your smart phone, and they will load any and all data you choose. There was a lengthy discussion in the Link Forum. It seems doable, but most comments were about the survivability of the company, then what.
RosettaStone Microchip
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Old 11-03-2012, 10:32 PM
 
Location: Native Floridian, USA
4,896 posts, read 5,863,520 times
Reputation: 6050
Quote:
Originally Posted by nitram View Post
It's a guideline that most cemeteries follow.

Cemeteries, unless posted no trespassing are public domain. Public domain is any type of work designated for public use that is not copyrighted. Graves cannot be copyrighted. Anything over 75 years old cannot be copyrighted, none of ancestral value.
thank you.
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Old 11-03-2012, 10:48 PM
 
Location: Southeast Missouri
5,812 posts, read 16,221,859 times
Reputation: 3318
Quote:
Originally Posted by rohirette View Post
From the posted article:

"Now not every cemetery has restrictions on photography. Many small cemeteries don’t have those kinds of rules; many smaller cemeteries and cemeteries that no longer accept burials don’t even have an active management to contact to ask for permission. I certainly wouldn’t hesitate to take a photograph in a cemetery where there was no office and no staff on site to ask. "

I maintain that in very old cemeteries the risk of "legal trouble" is nearly nil.
The last cemetery I photographed hasn't had a new burial for probably 30 years and it's rarely visited.

I guess I would technically count as a visitor at that cemetery since my great-great Grandma is buried there somewhere. Unfortunately she has no tombstone. I have other relatives on my father's side there.

I've photographed in another cemetery. I was there for a Civil War demonstration (near that site was a Civil War battle that I had an ancestor involved in) and after the demonstration I made a quick trip to the cemetery. People were all around. If anybody had a problem with it they would have said something.

Another cemetery I took a few pictures in is a very large one. I'm not sure if they have an office or not. My Grandpa, great-grandma, great-great grandma and various other relatives are buried there.

I'd say I'm pretty safe from anybody having a problem with me.

Oh, and I took pictures at the national cemeteries in Arlington and Gettysburg, but I don't think that's a problem. Lots of people take pictures there.

I think most cemeteries you can photograph without anybody bothering you. Of course, at Gettysburg some of the stones were inside a fence that is restricted just to family. I obviously didn't attempt to go in there. A fenced off cemetery or a cemetery with keep out signs means you really should get permission. If there's no fence and no office, most cemetery owners won't give you grief for visiting. It might be illegal to be there in some cases (like if it's a private cemetery and you have no relatives there), but it's rare that anybody cares (as long as you are respectful of the graves).
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Old 11-04-2012, 11:22 PM
 
Location: Volcano
12,971 posts, read 22,613,697 times
Reputation: 10524
Quote:
Originally Posted by SilverwingNC View Post
My perspective from photographing in graveyards and cemeteries all over the US, Canada, the UK, Chile, Peru, Ecuador, Costa Rica and Mexico for over 40 years...

I've never had an issue anywhere. I've never been challenged. I've never been bothered.

I am always sensitive to the surroundings and circumstances, and behave in a respectful and responsible manner. I always check for any signs or notices that indicate any restriction on photography, like not using a tripod, and obey what they say. In a few cases I have asked permission where indicated, and never been refused.

My impression from all this experience? People photographing gravestones for genealogical research are not an issue. A handheld camera, no tripod, no flash... no problem!

What have caused issues, and consequently resulted in restrictions on photography:

*Doing fashion shoots or wedding shoots (yes!) in cemeteries. Many have beautiful grounds with well tended flower gardens. Absolutely a must to request permission in advance.

*Disrespectful use... like musicians standing on top of gravestones, or people clowning around

*Celebrity graves... famous names sometimes draw excessive or inappropriate attention.

*Flashes disturbing nearby mourners

If in doubt, ask, if there is anyone to ask. I've never been refused.
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Old 11-05-2012, 07:36 PM
 
Location: In the Pearl of the Purchase, Ky
6,957 posts, read 12,372,463 times
Reputation: 29133
My wife has been working with geneology, including taking pictures in cemeteries for around 35 years, and she has never had a problem taking pictures in cemeteries. Didn't matter if it was a family cemetery, church, national, or any kind. If there is an office or on private property she asks, and, so far, has never been turned away. She does a lot of pictures for Find A Grave and Welcome | Random Acts of Kindness
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