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Old 02-22-2018, 02:36 AM
 
Location: Saint Paul, MN
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I hate when people go by fractions, as I am a percentage kinda guy. I think people think 1/32 sounds more impressive than 3.125%, eh? No, 3% isn't Native American. I am 1% Native American, that doesn't make me Native. I am also 6% Sub-Saharan ancestry. Doesn't make me black, though. It's not just about the DNA anyway it's about the experiences you have that are a reflection of your appearance and culture.
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Old 02-25-2018, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, not Paris. #MAGA.
9,697 posts, read 5,366,896 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rmm0484 View Post
i AM 1/16th Chippewa and some lesser fraction of Huron. I am a member of a chippewa tribe, but not culturally aligned to them (and get no benefits, but I have a BIA card), since I was ignorant of this fact until I was an adult. For purposes of cultural identity, some tribes elect to allow "half-breeds" and lesser mixes to become members of the tribe. Non-natives may also be adopted by the tribe but this does not happen often. If half-breeds and lesser breeds were not allowed, the tribes would eventually be bred out of existence, which some would consider a form of genocide. My tribe wants to retain its membership numbers.
Why don't you get any benefits from your tribe?? Is this by choice? Even if a tribe doesn't have any per capita payments, there are usually healthcare benefits, educational benefits, and other benefits (maybe you don't need them, though).
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Old 02-25-2018, 02:21 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, not Paris. #MAGA.
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Originally Posted by AntonioR View Post
Does a full-blooded Hawaiian exist anymore?
Yes, particularly on https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Niihau The residents of Niihau even speak Hawaiian as their primary language. Now, the number of full-blooded Hawaiians is definitely not significant, but that's another conversation.
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Old 02-25-2018, 02:24 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, not Paris. #MAGA.
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Originally Posted by Alandros View Post
What if the tribe is made up of a many people who have been fully considered tribal members for hundreds of years that were less than 50% indigenous DNA.

DNA does not equal ethnicity. John Ross the Principal Chief of the Cherokee during the trail of tears (the one who was avid about not removing and had support of the more pure blood members) was only 1/8th Cherokee by their tracking methods, possibly even less by DNA (due to heavy intermixing for so long). He was very much a Native American and was considered just as much by his fellow Cherokee.

Not all cultures and people consider their culture/ethnicity via the same rules you do.
I'm curious to know how widespread such acceptance was among different Native American tribes. Indeed, that John Ross (only being 1/8th Cherokee at most) was accepted by the Cherokee doesn't prove much to me. After all, the Cherokee were considered among the "Five Civilized tribes," precisely because they adopted western culture, including western farming techniques, intermarriage with whites, and the adoption of plantation style slavery with African slaves.
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Old 11-18-2018, 01:48 PM
 
4 posts, read 5,589 times
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Originally Posted by CAVA1990 View Post
How come only native Canadians consider themselves Canadian? Two of my wife's grandparents immigrated to the U.S. from there and she nor her siblings ever say "I'm Canadian" or even "I'm half Canadian". Have you ever heard any not from there say that?
My grandmother was Canadian. My mom is eligible for citizenship. I sure as hell consider myself 1/4 Canadian. I'm a native New Yorker with deep roots in colonial New England. I live on the Canadian aquatic border and an hour's drive from the nearest land border. I've visited many times. I keep contact with distant Canadian cousins. Canadian culture has always been a small part of our existence in WNY. If I was from someplace like Florida or Texas, it would be quite ridiculous to claim any sort of Canadian heritage.
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Old 11-18-2018, 02:36 PM
 
56 posts, read 4,631 times
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Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
I hate when people go by fractions, as I am a percentage kinda guy. I think people think 1/32 sounds more impressive than 3.125%, eh? No, 3% isn't Native American. I am 1% Native American, that doesn't make me Native. I am also 6% Sub-Saharan ancestry. Doesn't make me black, though. It's not just about the DNA anyway it's about the experiences you have that are a reflection of your appearance and culture.


Percentages and fractions do not matter, What matters is your known genealogy someone who is 6% black or 1/32 Native-American can be considered Native-American and Black just like someone who is 50% and 1/2.
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Old 11-19-2018, 02:25 PM
 
4,580 posts, read 1,576,802 times
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Originally Posted by Dr.drew View Post
This sounds like a guy with his own agenda. One that may or may not be favorable to real Native Americans. I woudn't think that would be close to enough to claim Native American status.

Chief Baker has been chief for many years. I think most people consider him good at what he does. And with the Cherokee, basically you just need to be able to prove your stock, so to speak. Basically, you have to prove that one of your direct anscestors were on the Dawes rolls. Actually, I think there might be one or two other rolls that can count as well.


Just a quickie from Wiki on Principal Chief John Baker...


Bill John Baker (born February 9, 1952) is the current Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation. First elected in October 2011, Baker defeated three-term incumbent Chief Chad "Corntassel" Smith. Prior to his election as Chief, Baker served 12 years on the Cherokee Tribal Council.
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Old 11-19-2018, 04:09 PM
 
11,655 posts, read 5,605,770 times
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Originally Posted by Padgett2 View Post
Let's see now...... ONE drop of black blood makes a person Black. (we don't seem to have a problem with that way of thinking.)

So what is the problem with ONE drop of American Indian blood making a person American Indian.

It stands to reason then, that white blood in any amount is not worth mentioning.
I haven't yet read all the comments but when I saw yours, I had been thinking the same thing. There were some states in the south that if you were 1/32 black, then "black" was listed as your race on your birth certificate.

Back to the topic at hand --- I'm 5% American Indian, which ancestry recently further refined to 3% Andean Indian and 2% North, Central, South Indian. Never in my life have I gone around telling people that I'm American Indian.

Yet, as others put it, it's up to individual tribes to determine who is eligible for tribal membership.
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Old 11-23-2018, 07:38 PM
 
Location: The Outer Limits
900 posts, read 1,550,332 times
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Growing up I was told, if someone has one drop of Black blood in them...they're Black.
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Old 11-23-2018, 07:50 PM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
8,289 posts, read 12,924,266 times
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Originally Posted by bgrasser View Post
Growing up I was told, if someone has one drop of Black blood in them...they're Black.
That's called the one drop rule and it's considered fairly racist now.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One-drop_rule
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