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Old 11-23-2018, 08:03 PM
 
Location: The Outer Limits
900 posts, read 1,550,332 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PA2UK View Post
That's called the one drop rule and it's considered fairly racist now.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One-drop_rule
I suppose in some circles that may be, could be beneficial if wanting to claim minority status.
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Old 11-25-2018, 08:43 AM
 
Location: plano
6,018 posts, read 7,567,732 times
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There is a monetary incentive to find one is more than say an eighth American Indian if you live in Oklahoma at least. At state universities you got a lower cost if you were at least this amount. It may be unique to American Indian so that is why it gets more focus than other heritages.


Also in the world of promoting or hiring based on additions to work force diversity, we see Elizabeth Warren situations where even Harvard bragged about having their first professor who was a native american indian. If one has diversity goals then an applicant with the sought after background gets an edge in being hired or perhaps being promoted at some entities.
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Old Yesterday, 05:01 PM
 
364 posts, read 77,215 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mhundred View Post
The Current Chief of the Cherokee Nation is Bill John Baker and he is only 1/32nd native american. Is this enough to really identity yourself as a native american?




If someone told you they were only 1/32nd native american but identified as a native american would you find that strange at all?
Yes because I didn't ask and wouldn't think to. If we were on the topic already, no I wouldn't.

A native american is a native american. you cannot change that. Any blood % counts. Does any blood % count to be a member of a certain tribe? No guarantees there.
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Old Yesterday, 05:03 PM
 
364 posts, read 77,215 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adrian71 View Post
It worked for Elizabeth Warren.
what worked for elixabeth warren?
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Old Yesterday, 05:18 PM
AFP
 
6,143 posts, read 3,707,542 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bgrasser View Post
Growing up I was told, if someone has one drop of Black blood in them...they're Black.
That's a remnant of US plantation culture and Jim Crow.
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Old Today, 06:38 PM
 
Location: Gallup, NM
39 posts, read 7,065 times
Reputation: 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mhundred View Post
The Current Chief of the Cherokee Nation is Bill John Baker and he is only 1/32nd native american. Is this enough to really identity yourself as a native american?

If someone told you they were only 1/32nd native american but identified as a native american would you find that strange at all?
I'm 100% Native American. My family can trace its southwestern roots back to the Basketmaker II Era. My family history documents migrations, conflict, wars, slavery, destruction of entire tribes, collapse of empires, intermarriage, and merging and assimilation of other tribes. The important thing to come about is survival and the establishment of harmonious relations/interconnections among humans.

When I look at the Cherokee, I admire them. They created "talking leaves," and they were able to adapt and educate themselves in remarkable ways. Unfortunately, they've also been through genocide, eradication of their people, losing their lovely lands to the savages of Georgia and being forcibly relocated to Oklahoma (Trail of Tears anyone?). The most important part of that story is their ability to survive. It's important to know this because it will happen again.

If defining themselves as descendants of their ancestors allows them to survive and establish themselves as a people, who am I to judge them for it? It is not my place to tell them (or anybody) who they are.

I can only suspect there was a lot of intermarriage in Cherokee due to the Oklahoma oil bonanza in the early 1900's. Cherokees and other Oklahoma tribes found themselves sitting on a goldmine, so they were targeted, killed, and bred out. Read Killers of the Flower Moon on how this transpired with the Osage nation of Oklahoma.
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Old Today, 06:53 PM
 
Location: Texas
6,994 posts, read 2,537,756 times
Reputation: 14842
Native American tribes don't use DNA to identify themselves as tribal members.
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