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Old 01-02-2014, 10:39 AM
 
Location: too far from the sea
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You can also find information on Black Irish from the links in Cyndislist.

Cyndi's List - Unique Peoples & Cultures - Black Dutch & Black Irish
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Old 01-02-2014, 09:34 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
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It is NOT racist to discuss either Black Irish or Black Dutch. If some people try to turn it into a racist thread because of the word "black" those posts will just be deleted. People should be allowed to discuss their ancestry.
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my posts as moderator will be in red. Moderator: Health&Wellness~Genealogy. The Rules--read here>>> TOS. If someone attacks you, do not reply. Hit REPORT.
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Old 01-07-2014, 04:23 PM
 
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Actual true black hair is very rare in Ireland, at less than 3% according to The Races of Europe. Pure brown eyes account for one half of 1% of the Irish population. So you can see how rare "black Irish" is, if by definition it is a true black haired pure brown eyed individual. In North America, if seen more frequently, it is likely due to admixture from Natives, blacks, or other darker ancestries.
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Old 01-08-2014, 06:39 AM
 
Location: Way South of the Volvo Line
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I grew up among the Irish- American community in Boston. I always understood "Black Irish" to refer to dark, being dark brown to black, hair and sometimes , but not always, dark, being hazel to brown, eyes. Many would consider the actors Pierce Brosnan and Colin Ferrel as Black Irish.
In fact, not as many of the human population as you might think have truly black hair, usually people of Asian descent. Even a large number of people of African descent have actually dark brown hair, not black.
That's why the term is so hard to quantify. It could originate as simply an ancient symbolic term describing transplants from Scotland during British rule of Ireland. Or it can be a descriptive term for those individuals with swarthy, darker coloring in a largely fair-skinned, light haired population. Most of the Irish folk I've known from here and across the pond had varied definitions of what they would call "Black Irish".
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Old 01-08-2014, 06:54 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tcrackly View Post
I grew up among the Irish- American community in Boston. I always understood "Black Irish" to refer to dark, being dark brown to black, hair and sometimes , but not always, dark, being hazel to brown, eyes. Many would consider the actors Pierce Brosnan and Colin Ferrel as Black Irish.
In fact, not as many of the human population as you might think have truly black hair, usually people of Asian descent. Even a large number of people of African descent have actually dark brown hair, not black.
That's why the term is so hard to quantify. It could originate as simply an ancient symbolic term describing transplants from Scotland during British rule of Ireland. Or it can be a descriptive term for those individuals with swarthy, darker coloring in a largely fair-skinned, light haired population. Most of the Irish folk I've known from here and across the pond had varied definitions of what they would call "Black Irish".
Well Pierce has blue eyes and freckled skin; only his hair is dark. As I've said in the other thread on this subject there is no such group as "Black Irish" in Ireland. The term is not used there. If anyone researched it they would find the term leads to the US. The only time I've heard black used as a description was my Grandmother used to call Northern Ireland "The Black North" and Protestants "Black". This was way in the past and my Grandmother died quite a few years ago.

I've only heard of the Black Irish on the internet. It is a nonsence term if you think about it as everyone would have someone with dark hair in their family. There is no separate group of Irish with dark hair and eyes. Why would anyone in Ireland use that term?
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Old 01-08-2014, 07:13 AM
 
Location: Way South of the Volvo Line
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As I stressed in my previous post, the term could have originated as symbolic reference to either the Viking invaders in medieval times to the Protestant/Scots introduction into the Northern Ireland community during British rule. Despite the fact that a large number of Irish are very fair and light in color, there is evidenced variability in the complexions of the general population. So obviously there is no discernible subset of Irish people that can trace their origins back to a single group of immigrants. Most were assimilated into the population through the years.
As for Black Irish as a term I have heard it from older folks in Boston's Irish community, albeit rarely, as a frivolous, descriptive observation of an Irishman with swarthy characteristics, nothing more.

Who were the Black Irish, and what is their story? | Irish Genealogy and Roots | IrishCentral
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Old 01-08-2014, 07:46 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tcrackly View Post
As I stressed in my previous post, the term could have originated as symbolic reference to either the Viking invaders in medieval times to the Protestant/Scots introduction into the Northern Ireland community during British rule. Despite the fact that a large number of Irish are very fair and light in color, there is evidenced variability in the complexions of the general population. So obviously there is no discernible subset of Irish people that can trace their origins back to a single group of immigrants. Most were assimilated into the population through the years.
As for Black Irish as a term I have heard it from older folks in Boston's Irish community, albeit rarely, as a frivolous, descriptive observation of an Irishman with swarthy characteristics, nothing more.

Who were the Black Irish, and what is their story? | Irish Genealogy and Roots | IrishCentral
Yes it is a term used in the US.

Here is an brief article on the subject.

The term 'Black Irish' has commonly been in circulation among Irish emigrants and their descendants for centuries. As a subject of historical discussion the subject is almost never referred to in Ireland. There are a number of different claims as to the origin of the term, none of which are possible to prove or disprove.

Black Irish
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Old 01-08-2014, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Way South of the Volvo Line
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We're actually on the same page---virtually the same article written by Irish journalists.
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Old 01-08-2014, 07:41 PM
 
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Originally Posted by tcrackly View Post
We're actually on the same page---virtually the same article written by Irish journalists.
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Old 01-09-2014, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saxonwold View Post
There are no such thing as Black Irish. It was only a social term used for Irish people who were very dark-haired/black-haired or also darker-eyed, or also those who weren't as fair-complexioned as what an average Irish person looked like. However there is no scientific evidence that would separate the so-called "Black Irish" from other Irish people.
Colin Farrell Aidan Turner
They do look a lot like Spaniards though. I would not be surprised if there is a link there.
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