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Old 05-03-2013, 08:46 AM
 
Location: Wisconsin
7,215 posts, read 7,611,304 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
Just found this older message - I think you'll find that Laura Ingalls was eighteen when she married Almanzo Wilder, who was ten years older. Laura had taught school for about a year prior to her marriage, in addition to working as a seamstress, and was viewed as a young adult by all in her community (well, Pa still called her "half-pint", but he was her Pa, after all!).
I had a grade school friend whose parents married when they were only 15 (I'm only 33...I believe their marriage would have been in the late 1960's). I guess their parents signed off on it.
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Old 05-03-2013, 08:17 PM
 
Location: Center of the universe
24,757 posts, read 33,024,815 times
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For my father's family, which is African American, I can only get four of his eight great-grandparents. We don't have anything else to work with.
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Old 05-10-2013, 04:02 PM
 
Location: San Marcos, TX
2,572 posts, read 6,301,031 times
Reputation: 3999
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
Sometimes when states seem to change it is because the borders between states changed. A town that was in one state originally could be in another state later. There was such a change for TN and KY. Of course, that would not explain TN and OH. You can see if the TN/KY line change might have affected your family. Apparently settlers in the area were never completely sure what state they were in until about 1859!

RootsWeb: KYALLEN-L [KYALLEN] More on Walker's Line TN/KY boundary dispute

Surveyors Error In Drawing 'Walker Line' Kept Tennessee, Kentucky At Odds For Many Years

Sometimes the person giving the info may have known that someone lived in one state and assumed he was born there.

County borders changed a lot. That means when you start looking for records you have to know when the changes happened. Otherwise you may be looking in the wrong courthouse.
This is really helpful, I had no idea. I keep coming across ancestors who were listed on the census as being born in TN, then ten years later as being born in KY, and back and forth. I've also seen the same with respect to NC/SC. But much much more of the KY/TN thing.

Also have an ancestor married in a town that no longer exists. My uncle visited the current location.
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Old 05-10-2013, 07:59 PM
bjh
 
Location: Memphis - home of the king
26,567 posts, read 22,885,577 times
Reputation: 119954
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sally_Sparrow View Post
This is really helpful, I had no idea. I keep coming across ancestors who were listed on the census as being born in TN, then ten years later as being born in KY, and back and forth. I've also seen the same with respect to NC/SC. But much much more of the KY/TN thing.

Also have an ancestor married in a town that no longer exists. My uncle visited the current location.
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
Sometimes when states seem to change it is because the borders between states changed. A town that was in one state originally could be in another state later. There was such a change for TN and KY. Of course, that would not explain TN and OH. You can see if the TN/KY line change might have affected your family. Apparently settlers in the area were never completely sure what state they were in until about 1859!

RootsWeb: KYALLEN-L [KYALLEN] More on Walker's Line TN/KY boundary dispute

Surveyors Error In Drawing 'Walker Line' Kept Tennessee, Kentucky At Odds For Many Years

Sometimes the person giving the info may have known that someone lived in one state and assumed he was born there.

County borders changed a lot. That means when you start looking for records you have to know when the changes happened. Otherwise you may be looking in the wrong courthouse.

Thank you both for that! That could really help in one of my family lines!
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Old 05-10-2013, 10:59 PM
 
Location: North Central Illinois
5,411 posts, read 3,889,117 times
Reputation: 35934
My grandmother lived to be 91. I was in my mid 20's when she died and could kick myself for not asking her more stuff about our family. When I ask my mother about the family, immigration, deaths, etc... She doesn't know because she didn't ask either! She said the grandparents had hard lives in the early 1900's, people and children/babies died young, so they didn't like to talk about the past. Makes sense to me but I would sure like to know some specifics about some family things.
I know one thing about birthdates. If you weren't born in a hospital and were born at home, like my grandfather was, and someone forgot to write the birthdate down somewhere people just guessed when you were born. So my grandfather always said he was born 'around apple picking time'. So someone (don't know who) guessed his birthday was September-something.
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Old 05-16-2013, 12:20 PM
 
77 posts, read 108,453 times
Reputation: 66
I was unable to read thru every page of this thread so forgive me if some one
responded similarly.

Ancestors not knowing their ancestry is not at all uncommon among African
Americans for obvious reasons; very troublesome for researchers.

I have been successful in putting a maternal line together, however, I have few
confirmations of accuracy.
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Old 05-16-2013, 05:33 PM
 
Location: East of the Mississippi and South of Bluegrass
4,136 posts, read 3,425,022 times
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This may or may not be exactly the right answer but for the grandparents I never knew and the ancestors who preceeded them this was my father's explanation to us children when we asked him this question for a school assignment.

What is your nationality?

My mother (born in 1931 and passed away in 1991), being a very practical and logical woman, answered, we are Americans.

My father (born in 1921 and passed away in 2002), was really a little deeper and replied that growing up in rural Tennessee in a combined family of 17 children they had more pressing concerns than their family's ancestral country/countries of origin. Now remember the time that he has come of age in.

As a young man it had been pointed out to him by his father that there was not a need for such information because the only thing you needed to know about a man and his family was their honesty and trustworthiness. In short there were Whites, Coloreds, and Indians. In saying this you need to know that these simple facts came in an era when such facts were just that...the facts. There was absolutely no malice or ill intent in stating this to us children and we were raised well enough by great parents (and good people too) and knew what my father's point was.

They did not know anything at all about their ancestors other than their names.

Best regards, sincerely

HomeIsWhere...
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Old 01-07-2015, 06:51 PM
 
Location: zippidy doo dah
893 posts, read 1,272,689 times
Reputation: 1908
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaseMan View Post
I went through the first 30 years of my life thinking my grandmother on my father's side was of Jewish ancestry (turns out that was completely false). It happens.
Funny - I went through the first 30 years of my life not knowing my grandfather on my mother's side WAS Jewish. Families are strange..................
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Old 01-07-2015, 09:42 PM
 
860 posts, read 760,405 times
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Unfortunately this isn't uncommon at all. Now that I'm into genealogy I want to dig out every detail but growing up and in my 20s I really didn't know much. I knew a few things about my parents and where they grew up, I met my grandparents and knew one of them a bit closer, we visited a couple times. Both my grandparents died before I was 10-12 so I never knew them.

Unfortunately my grandparents mostly passed down even less information to my parents. My father's father didn't like his step dad and in the few stories my grandma shared to my father before she died she shared he would hop trains when he was young and spend a lot of time away from home. They met and married 6 years later and moved from Kansas to California shortly after... by all accounts he sounded like a very interesting person and basically being a hobo for a while I imagine he had all sorts of stories to tell... but he didn't.

My mothers father had a lot secrets that came out long after his death, my mother, aunts, and uncles made contact with a half sibling that some people knew about but never shared to most people for decades and decades. Apparently they likely have another half sibling (and another aunt for me) out there based on stories and child paternity papers that were kept hidden but it isn't fully known. Apparently he slept around a lot and who knows how many aunts or uncles I have out there... he also apparently told people my grandmother was a nanny who looked after his children and not his wife. He also was a drunk that could be violent sometimes. So yeah, no surprise that my mother never got a whole lot of family history from him. Apparently his father beat him though so though it doesn't excuse anything he did I understand things a little bit more.

It's not quite the same but a similar story for my grandmother's (mothers mother) family... lots of not very nice fathers that caused not much family information to be passed down.

A couple branches were a bit better, mostly my father's mother's line, they were close and I have a couple stories since they lived next door... but not much overall. It's very hard to dig out more stories, I still hope to find cousins from each of those lines who had parents that did pass down stories and information.

I was also born in the west, Arizona, so as I go back my ancestors were typically moving further west... I think this also created a disconnect since they didn't grow up surrounded by an abundance of cousins or relatives.
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Old 01-09-2015, 03:14 PM
 
14,532 posts, read 7,190,072 times
Reputation: 7489
I agree this is not uncommon. One that is aggravating me right now is that one of my great great great grandmothers, who was born a free person here in Ohio is listed on her death certificate as being from "Greenfield, Ohio." Yet, I have pictures of my grandmother and her mom going to visit this side of the family in Springfield, Ohio. Greenfield and Springfield aren't that far away from each other but are in different counties and both had populations of free people of color in the 1830s-1840s when my great great grandmother was born and both have underground rail road history.

So I am scouring a lot of records lately looking for her in both places. Due to having a very commno name, I did find a mullato girl in Springfield and a "colored" girl in Greenfield that both have her name lol. So it is a fun winter for me with this one.

I recently found out that one of my 3rd cousins who is in his 90s and still pretty sharp is alive and kicking here in my hometown so I am going to go visit him as he lived with the daughter of the ancestor I am trying to find and I think he may know if they were from Greenfield or Springfield lol.

But yea, I have lots of relatives now who don't know much about family members. One of my funny cousins, who is in her 30s didn't know that our step-great grandmother (our real great grandmother died in 1938) wasn't our real great grandmother lol. She also didn't know what relation her future child would be to her niece. I mean it was basic stuff here that was hilarious.

I have always been interested in genealogy since I was about 12 so I am one people come to in order to figure out where people were born or their maiden names for the women and other things of that nature. So it always astounds me when people don't know where their great grandparents were from, especially whites here in America as I do give black people a pass who are older due to them just not talking about that sort of things in previous generations, but those my age or younger (I am 35) they should know where their grandparents were born IMO.

ETA: The one that gets on my nerves the most is when the government officials put the wrong demographics in things. One of my ancestors was listed as white on the birth registry for 1891 when he was not white. Due to that and me looking for colored or mullato, I had to look through the microfilm instead of finding it online at our local library and had to go through about 3 years worth of births and I found him in marked as white when he definately was not. I have had this happen a few times for various relatives. They also mixed up some names - like making the first name the middle name for one of my great great grandfathers. His name was James Edward but he was listed as Edward James in some official documents. This was confusing because he had a son named Edward James and initially I thought those documents were for him and not James Edward. They also messed up the father of the white labeled child when he died. His name was Elias, and he was listed as Elia and I couldn't find his burial records due to that. In the cemetery records he is listed as Eli. So lots of variations going on way back when. They also listed his last name in 3 different spellings on those 3 different records.
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