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Old 02-22-2013, 01:56 PM
 
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Differeing degrees of bipolar disorder following the women on my maternal grandmother's side of the family going back a few hundred years to Ireland and Italy.
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Old 02-22-2013, 02:38 PM
 
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I am composed of many immigrants and a common theme is all the men running away from military service lol, doesn't matter what country.

Ironically, I am trying to get into the military and hopefully I'll make it a tradition under my family branch.
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Old 02-23-2013, 05:48 AM
 
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On one side of my family (maternal grandmother) all the women's first names were traditionally the middle names of female relatives who had already died.
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Old 02-23-2013, 01:21 PM
 
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Alcoholism through the men. I am convinced it is genetic. and colorblindness, X-linked isn't it? through the woman.
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Old 05-09-2013, 08:35 PM
bjh
 
Location: Memphis - home of the king
26,094 posts, read 22,780,245 times
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Snip:
Quote:
Originally Posted by TracySam View Post
...
One big theme that comes up, over and over in my family tree is "forbidden marriages." I have examples going back to the 1700s of people who were disowned from their family for marrying the "wrong" man or woman. Even if not totally disowned, there are multiple records and stories of families expressing opposition to a marriage (like parents conspicuously not being present at the wedding or mentioning the disapproved-of marriage in a will.) Several examples of these "forbidden marriages" involved Protestants marrying Catholics, with much protest and consternation from both sides.
...
Good topic. Sorry I missed it first time around. Here goes anyway.

In our family there is a theme of falling out, but only along a specific line of the family tree. It's as if it ran in that part of the family. I hadn't thought of it as "forbidden marriages," though that's a useful way to look at it. One was due to the Protestant v Catholic issue. One was due to the perception that the groom was an alcoholic. He was not, but had stupidly been drunk at the bride's family home during the courtship. One was the opposite, a "forbidden divorce," which caused the problem.

As someone I know has said, "Divorce can be a blessing." Can be. True.
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Old 05-10-2013, 06:52 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
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Here's an interesting theme in our family from my dad's side:

We have a family farm/large property that has been in our family since the 1890s. At one point it was a working farm with a cotton gin, chair factory, crops, etc. Four generations have been raised on that farm. For much of my life, it was owned by a set of siblings (my grandfather and his brothers and sisters) and changed hands, within the family, several times. So many, many cousins, aunts, uncles, grandparents, etc have lived there over the 120 years it's been in the family. My father eventually inherited part of it and then bought the rest of it from his cousins.

In every generation, there has been at least one son (curiously, no daughters) who felt entitled to simply not really work, and just lay around the place sponging off other people and being vaguely pleasant but sorry as mud. Also, within every generation, there's been at least one sibling who really struck it rich (always entrepreneurs) and the lazy sibling always felt entitled somehow to live off the assets of others. I mean, it is a distinct sort of personality - hard to explain really but every one of these men has been good natured, handsome, a substance abuser, divorced (no surprise there, considering they basically refuse to actually work), rather obsessed with the homeplace, and oddly enough, fully expecting to inherit at least part of it and just live there till they die. A couple of them has actually managed to do this, though I don't know how they pulled it off - I mean, someone was feeding them, paying utilities, providing a vehicle, etc.

I think it's so weird. My brother is the latest in this string of n'er do wells. However, eventually my parents banned him from the property because all he wanted to do was hang out in one of the guest houses, drink all night, sleep all day, and do nothing more but drive around in a jeep shooting his gun and getting the jeep stuck out in the boonies.

GRRRRRRRRRRR!!!!
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Old 05-10-2013, 07:43 AM
 
Location: too far from the sea
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I have another one and again, on my paternal side. Moving. Even though they had been in the same tiny village for hundreds of years, my gt grandfather left and moved to the city. The rest of his life he kept on moving. It was probably due the to changing times (Industrial Revolution) and he was moving to get work. I get the idea he was looking for better and better work or a better and better life.

His son, my grandfather, moved out of England to this country and then continued moving. I think it was for better jobs but my dad said he was always starting over in a new school and that one time they moved just to move. They moved next store!

My dad did stay in one place but I've got it. I'm in the same state as always but I've always moved, thinking that there is something better. Now I finally live next to the ocean, something I learned from the older generation who had lived by the sea in one of their moves in England.
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Old 05-10-2013, 07:49 AM
 
Location: North Carolina
2,657 posts, read 7,004,191 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TracySam View Post
As a therapist, I would sometimes do a genogram (simple family tree focused on clinical issues) with clients, and we would identify repetitive themes that would come up in one generation after another.
Heh. Out-of-wedlock children?

My g-g-grandmother (born in 1860) had a child before marriage (and didn't marry the father but someone else). Her son likely married my paternal grandmother to save her reputation (he claimed the child - my father - as his, but it would take a DNA test to be sure. they were also cousins, which causes a snarl in how I designate the fact that my g-g-grandmother's son married my grandmother ). A generation was skipped when my father, a more honorable gent, married my mother. It was three years before my older sibling was born. Each of my siblings has had a kid before marriage. When I began to delve into the pairings and births among cousins on my paternal side, I find the same pattern.

I think marriage is a fine institution; have been happily ensconced in it for almost 30 years and am childfree; but the pattern of my family seems to point to the vows being sort of an after thought
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Old 05-10-2013, 06:45 PM
bjh
 
Location: Memphis - home of the king
26,094 posts, read 22,780,245 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Here's an interesting theme in our family from my dad's side:

We have a family farm/large property that has been in our family since the 1890s. At one point it was a working farm with a cotton gin, chair factory, crops, etc. Four generations have been raised on that farm. For much of my life, it was owned by a set of siblings (my grandfather and his brothers and sisters) and changed hands, within the family, several times. So many, many cousins, aunts, uncles, grandparents, etc have lived there over the 120 years it's been in the family. My father eventually inherited part of it and then bought the rest of it from his cousins.

In every generation, there has been at least one son (curiously, no daughters) who felt entitled to simply not really work, and just lay around the place sponging off other people and being vaguely pleasant but sorry as mud. Also, within every generation, there's been at least one sibling who really struck it rich (always entrepreneurs) and the lazy sibling always felt entitled somehow to live off the assets of others. I mean, it is a distinct sort of personality - hard to explain really but every one of these men has been good natured, handsome, a substance abuser, divorced (no surprise there, considering they basically refuse to actually work), rather obsessed with the homeplace, and oddly enough, fully expecting to inherit at least part of it and just live there till they die. A couple of them has actually managed to do this, though I don't know how they pulled it off - I mean, someone was feeding them, paying utilities, providing a vehicle, etc.

I think it's so weird. My brother is the latest in this string of n'er do wells. However, eventually my parents banned him from the property because all he wanted to do was hang out in one of the guest houses, drink all night, sleep all day, and do nothing more but drive around in a jeep shooting his gun and getting the jeep stuck out in the boonies.

GRRRRRRRRRRR!!!!
Thanks for posting that, very interesting. Such people are irritating to say the least. You may, of course, disagree with what I'm about to write, but that's an almost perfect description of a sociopath. I hasten to add, not all sociopaths are serial killers, as movies have led the general public to believe. Sociopaths tend to live a parasitic lifestyle, abuse substances, have a sense of entitlement to others' money and property, etc. That type of mental condition or just really rotten personality is highly heritable. Many families have such individuals. There is no cure. We can just be glad if we didn't inherit that particular strain of genes!
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Old 05-10-2013, 06:48 PM
bjh
 
Location: Memphis - home of the king
26,094 posts, read 22,780,245 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
I have another one and again, on my paternal side. Moving. Even though they had been in the same tiny village for hundreds of years, my gt grandfather left and moved to the city. ...
That reminds me of a theme in our family: city slickers. We have tended to live in cities going back quite far, as opposed to rural dwellers. I think that's made searching easier.
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