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Old 05-27-2013, 04:12 PM
 
Location: Pacific NW
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TracySam View Post
No, I would say that if you're studying genes and DNA, that would be "genetics" not "genealogy." Hell, the Bible talks a lot about genealogy, but genetics was not known back then.

In a nutshell, OP, ancestry is who you're descended from, and genealogy is the study of ancestry.
But genealogy is also the study of descendency. Genealogy is the study of familial relationships. Of all kinds, not just ancestral ones.

But I agree with you about DNA - it is the study of genetics. It can be a tool, but really doesn't do a whole lot in adding to genealogical research. Unless they're talking about proving a parent/child connection.
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Old 10-13-2014, 01:49 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagurl View Post
Yes, absolutely, you have to be careful of what's out there on Ancestry. Someone gave my poor grandfather an extra wife, with a couple of children -- then he married my grandmother, and somewhere in between he also had an illegitimate child. Except . . . other than my grandmother, none of the info is accurate. Now it's gone viral and when I write to these folks and tell them that this information is totally false, IF I get a response (which is seldom), the response is, "Oh. We don't care if it's accurate." A lot of stuff is very, very helpful, but you do have to sift through a lot of dirt and garbage to find a diamond!
While I am not sure how much on Ancestry.com is inaccurate (or elsewhere for that matter), that's why checking the sources as much as possible help make your own trees more accurate.

Anyway back to topic at hand for this thead, it's good to know to reiterate meanings of the words genealogy and ancestry.
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Old 10-14-2014, 05:16 PM
 
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you not going change his mind, but when i got mine tested, i found i was related to another namesake that goes back to 1200. even told me where i was from within 100 miles, ( it was more luck than science)
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Old 12-18-2014, 01:05 PM
 
731 posts, read 1,316,479 times
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I guess everyone does genealogy their own way. To each his own. There is misinformation at all internet sites.
I have been very lucky and have had a relative (actually my late husbands great uncle) send me copies of actual documents, as he helped translate the Gallup Dioscese records. One family had a great deal of information, but a lot was incorrect according according to actual documents. We had emailed and shared information before I found that out. I felt awkward, I couldn't tell them their info was wrong; I just had to quit talking to them. If a person wants a biological tree as much as possible, one has to use documents to prove lineage. Even then, some documents aren't entirely correct every time.

After having said all that, could someone explain to me how you find relatives through DNA, what is a genome and why are a lot of people using DNA? Do you pay to see other people's DNA results and why do spit and send instead of swabbing and send? I'm old and I don't get it?


Cheers
Thanks a lot

Last edited by tinynot; 12-18-2014 at 01:20 PM..
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Old 12-18-2014, 07:36 PM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tinynot View Post
After having said all that, could someone explain to me how you find relatives through DNA,
Living relatives? The system does that for you - it compares your DNA with everyone else who has tested with that company and finds relatives based on matching DNA. It presents these matches to you in a list.

Quote:
what is a genome
I'm not super scientific but I believe a genome is essentially a segment of your DNA/a chromosome.

Quote:
and why are a lot of people using DNA?
There are many reasons people decide to test their DNA for genealogy purposes. Some people are hopefully to break down brick walls in their tree, others just want to know the ethnicity percentages. Some might have been adopted and are looking for biological relatives. Some might be looking to confirm their biological relation to certain ancestors.

Quote:
Do you pay to see other people's DNA results
You can't really see their full DNA, just the portions that match your own DNA. You do not have to pay extra for this, however, access to it varies by company. AncestryDNA does not have a chromosomal browser so you can not view your own DNA let alone anyone else's. 23andMe only allows you to see your relatives matching DNA with their permission - so you can invite them to share it with you and they have to accept. FTDNA allows you to view your matching DNA without needing permission.

Quote:
and why do spit and send instead of swabbing and send?
I don't know, perhaps they want to make sure there is enough material to work with - a swab only provides the amount of saliva/DNA on the swab but the spit tube contains much more.
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Old 12-18-2014, 07:59 PM
 
Location: 2016 Clown Car...fka: Wisconsin
738 posts, read 771,028 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PA2UK View Post
I don't know, perhaps they want to make sure there is enough material to work with - a swab only provides the amount of saliva/DNA on the swab but the spit tube contains much more.
I've been scratching my head at that one too since my DH only had to do a swab. But...I'm wondering if it's because the companies are doing more 'autosomal' testing versus just y-DNA. Maybe autosomal requires more saliva whereas testing y- or mt-DNA does not. Just a guess...shrug...

RVcook
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Old 12-19-2014, 08:39 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque NM
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There are several different companies that test DNA and some send you a tube to spit in, others send scrapers for your cheek and vials to place them in. It doesn't have to do with whether they are testing Y-DNA or autosomal DNA. Probably the scraper has more cells on it (after you use it) than your saliva.

"A genome is an organism's complete set of DNA, including all of its genes. Each genome contains all of the information needed to build and maintain that organism. In humans, a copy of the entire genome—more than 3 billion DNA base pairs—is contained in all cells that have a nucleus." (Genetics Home Reference)
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Old 12-22-2014, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Arizona
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PA2UK View Post
I know a lot of people who were adopted and I know your comment about genealogy being people that are "actually related" would offend many of them. It would be better to say "biologically related".



But the Bible is a translation, not necessarily a literal one. And it's no coincidence that genealogy and genetics share the same root word. But that said, the definition of genealogy makes no mention of DNA or genetics or biological relations (see below).



"Genealogy" can have multiple meanings though. One meaning is indeed as a "study" but it can be used in other contexts. I could say "I enjoy researching my genealogy" just as I say "I enjoy researching my ancestry." So yes, they can be synonymous.

Here's what the dictionary says:



The second definition is what you're talking about but it also has three other definitions.



Note that NEITHER of them say anything about DNA or biological relation. That's from Dictionary.com but Merriam Webster says pretty much the same thing. Only Oxford Dictionary mentions "genetics" in the definition of ancestry but that was only one definition, not all of them.

In my mind, genealogy refers more to one's actual tree or pedigree whereas ancestry refers more to the people (or ancestors) within it. Family history refers to their stories and heritage refers to their culture or ethnicity. But that's just how I feel about the terminology. Obviously, whether or not any of those words distinguish between a biological tree/ancestors and an adoptive one is highly debatable and it may just come down to personal interpretation. One thing is for sure though, regardless of what I think, I would NEVER tell someone who was adopted that they are not actually studying their genealogy (or ancestry) by researching their adopted family tree. Even if I thought that a term like "family history" was more appropriate to a non-biological relation, I would not say so. It would just be pedantic and unnecessary and probably offend them.
Most of those definitions are biological relations. Linage, descent, etc,
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Old 12-22-2014, 10:49 AM
 
Location: too far from the sea
18,023 posts, read 17,167,297 times
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Originally Posted by PA2UK View Post
I know a lot of people who were adopted and I know your comment about genealogy being people that are "actually related" would offend many of them. It would be better to say "biologically related".

But the Bible is a translation, not necessarily a literal one. And it's no coincidence that genealogy and genetics share the same root word. But that said, the definition of genealogy makes no mention of DNA or genetics or biological relations (see below).

"Genealogy" can have multiple meanings though. One meaning is indeed as a "study" but it can be used in other contexts. I could say "I enjoy researching my genealogy" just as I say "I enjoy researching my ancestry." So yes, they can be synonymous.

Here's what the dictionary says:

The second definition is what you're talking about but it also has three other definitions.

Note that NEITHER of them say anything about DNA or biological relation. That's from Dictionary.com but Merriam Webster says pretty much the same thing. Only Oxford Dictionary mentions "genetics" in the definition of ancestry but that was only one definition, not all of them.

In my mind, genealogy refers more to one's actual tree or pedigree whereas ancestry refers more to the people (or ancestors) within it. Family history refers to their stories and heritage refers to their culture or ethnicity. But that's just how I feel about the terminology. Obviously, whether or not any of those words distinguish between a biological tree/ancestors and an adoptive one is highly debatable and it may just come down to personal interpretation. One thing is for sure though, regardless of what I think, I would NEVER tell someone who was adopted that they are not actually studying their genealogy (or ancestry) by researching their adopted family tree. Even if I thought that a term like "family history" was more appropriate to a non-biological relation, I would not say so. It would just be pedantic and unnecessary and probably offend them.



Thinkalot
Most of those definitions are biological relations. Linage, descent, etc,

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In my mind, genealogy refers more to one's actual tree or pedigree whereas ancestry refers more to the people (or ancestors) within it. Family history refers to their stories and heritage refers to their culture or ethnicity.

I like this definition too. To me genealogy is more the study of ancestry and genealogy includes the family tree or proof of descent, the lineage. Genealogy would be the more scholarly term. But as far as actual biological descendants, can we ever be 100% certain? DNA/genetics helps with recent ancestors but you can't really know for certain that your 18th century ancestors are truly your own.
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Old 12-22-2014, 11:41 PM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
8,223 posts, read 12,818,867 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thinkalot View Post
Most of those definitions are biological relations. Linage, descent, etc,
So look up the words lineage, descent, etc - they don't mention biological relations.
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