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Old 02-14-2014, 04:14 PM
Status: "happy again, no longer catless! t...." (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,431 posts, read 16,724,550 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frihed89 View Post
Potato pickers? When I was a boy spending my summers in Kensington, NH in the 1950s, they were treated like gypsies. Hopefully, they have prospered. Yes, I also picked potatoes, but couldn't keep up. In those days, I was a "striker", a kid who gets loaned out to another farmer in return for some goods or services provided by the farmer. While prohibited by the 13th Amendment, it flourished among Yankee families around where i lived.
My uncle's family (my aunts husband) were migrant potato pickers. They were part basque. He grew up traveling from one place to another and working very young. He and his brother got hired in construction and settled down, but some of his family ended up in Idaho and worked the fields after he and his brother quit.

He used to tell the kids when they complained he'd walked a mile in the snow to get to school. I suspect that some of the time he wasn't completely adding to the story.
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Old 02-15-2014, 05:01 AM
bjh bjh started this thread
 
Location: Memphis - home of the king
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
If these are people who lived in NH it's very likely any French surnames would have their origins in Quebec. Or Canada's eastern provinces that once formed Acadia (New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island).
All my New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Newfoundland ancestors were English or Scottish.
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Old 02-15-2014, 07:14 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
A long time ago (abt 1998) I was in an online genealogy group based in the UK. I was somewhat of a newbie but many of these people were professional genealogists or at least very experienced and knowledgeable. To them it was a standing joke that anyone would claim to have been traced back to Adam and Eve.

They used to say that you usually could not get back beyond 500 years--at least in England, maybe in Europe too. There usually were no surnames and records were scant. There are rare cases where a royal or near royal family kept records so a FEW people might be able to trace themselves quite a way back.

I, too, have seen family trees that supposedly go back to someone in ancient Rome or Egypt. Those are not true but if someone really wants to believe it, no one can stop them. I'd rather stick to reality.
Very interesting post. I love learning the meaning of family names and I did not know this regarding the British Isles (Scotch-Irish-English) or mainland Europe. From what little I know, going back about 500 years tops is probably tops for the vast majority of us with European heritage.

This is some more recent finds for me (from a few months ago). I figured I had more British Isles heritage on one side of my family, but I found some strong German lineage as well with a many (great-times) grandparent who was a Hessian solder who came to the Colonies to fight the British. I was able to find his name and some of his already-researched lineage going back to the Hesse state (Frankfurt area) in Germany to the 1600s. This ancestor was then awarded land in Virginia, I believe. I have no idea how accurate this research was completed by others, but it was interesting to think I may have documented heritage to the 1600s. I am not sure how to research this German side of the family that far back, but it would be fascinating when I have time to do it (when I am retired much later on).
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Old 02-15-2014, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
A long time ago (abt 1998) I was in an online genealogy group based in the UK. I was somewhat of a newbie but many of these people were professional genealogists or at least very experienced and knowledgeable. To them it was a standing joke that anyone would claim to have been traced back to Adam and Eve.

They used to say that you usually could not get back beyond 500 years--at least in England, maybe in Europe too. There usually were no surnames and records were scant. There are rare cases where a royal or near royal family kept records so a FEW people might be able to trace themselves quite a way back.

I, too, have seen family trees that supposedly go back to someone in ancient Rome or Egypt. Those are not true but if someone really wants to believe it, no one can stop them. I'd rather stick to reality.

Surnames go back much further than 500 years. I have lines going back to the 1600s in America and even further in Europe. Finding the paper trail may be difficult the further you go back, though.

BBC - Family History - What's In a Name? Your Link to the Past
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Old 02-15-2014, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
Surnames go back much further than 500 years. I have lines going back to the 1600s in America and even further in Europe. Finding the paper trail may be difficult the further you go back, though.

BBC - Family History - What's In a Name? Your Link to the Past
Actually, it really depends on the culture and sometimes the individual family. In Scandinavian cultures, it was not unusual for families to have no surname well into the 1800s. I have many Norwegian families in my tree who did not take up a fixed family name until they moved to America in the mid 1800s. However, there is one Norwegian family in my tree that held an old Viking surname so sometimes it depends on the family. I also have some German families who immigrated in the 1600s and 1700s and did not have surnames until that point. However, in my English families, they did have surnames going all the way back to the 1500s and maybe beyond so I think in Britain perhaps surnames were used earlier on than some other cultures. In the nobility especially, we can see the use of surnames going back well beyond 500 years ago in England.

That said, it is still possible to research even when a family did not have a fixed surname, I have done it for several generations in Norway. It's more likely that researching beyond 500 years ago becomes difficult because surviving records are more scarce. You do reach a point where the records just run out and the only people who can research beyond that point are descendants of nobility or royalty, who were well documented. But that point can vary depending on the location and family so I would not put a date on it.
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Old 02-18-2014, 07:14 AM
 
485 posts, read 338,180 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
A long time ago (abt 1998) I was in an online genealogy group based in the UK. I was somewhat of a newbie but many of these people were professional genealogists or at least very experienced and knowledgeable. To them it was a standing joke that anyone would claim to have been traced back to Adam and Eve.
That reminds me of one of Henry VIII's historical exploits: He had his family tree traced back to… Adam and Eve! (It was nonsense, of course, but Henry thought it would give the Tudors an air of legitimacy since they were newly minted royal upstarts.) He then had this bogus family tree turned into a tapestry, which I believe still hangs today in Hampton Court.
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Old 02-18-2014, 01:59 PM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
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Originally Posted by RDM66 View Post
That reminds me of one of Henry VIII's historical exploits: He had his family tree traced back to… Adam and Eve! (It was nonsense, of course, but Henry thought it would give the Tudors an air of legitimacy since they were newly minted royal upstarts.) He then had this bogus family tree turned into a tapestry, which I believe still hangs today in Hampton Court.
I know that Henry VII (Henry VIII's father) claimed to be descended from King Arthur and had pedigrees made up to prove it, in order to give himself, as a usurper, a stronger claim to the throne. It is why he named his first son and heir Arthur. However, I don't see why claiming to be a descendant of Adam and Eve would give the Tudors an air of legitimacy since every human being is supposedly a descendant of Adam and Eve. It would make the Tudor's claim to the throne no stronger than the peasants in the street. I'm not saying there isn't a tapestry with such a pedigree on it, I'm just saying it wouldn't have added legitimacy to the Tudor's reign.
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Old 02-18-2014, 03:37 PM
bjh bjh started this thread
 
Location: Memphis - home of the king
26,289 posts, read 22,824,791 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RDM66 View Post
That reminds me of one of Henry VIII's historical exploits: He had his family tree traced back to… Adam and Eve! (It was nonsense, of course, but Henry thought it would give the Tudors an air of legitimacy since they were newly minted royal upstarts.) He then had this bogus family tree turned into a tapestry, which I believe still hangs today in Hampton Court.
I met someone in a genealogy library who claimed the same based on online family trees. Talk about gullible.
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Old 02-18-2014, 06:33 PM
 
Location: Center of the universe
24,757 posts, read 32,943,865 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TribalCat View Post
I've been trying to find information about my great-grandmother. She and her husband were living in Cuba when my grandfather was born. My father had sent me her name as Maria Yslas e Quinveges, but I have no other information about her. I knew my great-grandfather had left the Basque Country in Spain to move to Cuba with his siblings and parents, but I don't know if he brought his wife with him or if he met her in Cuba. My grandfather has two cities listed as his birthplace, Cienfuegos and Bayamo, Cuba. Last year, I contacted cathedrals in both towns, but neither could find any record of his birth. I was hoping that information about his mother would be listed on it. I've been looking online for the name or word "Quinveges" but have found it nowhere, until the other day when someone in a Basque genealogy group suggested that it might be Portuguese, as they do have the name "Quimbegas" and the "e" between her surnames rather than a "y" is Portuguese rather than Spanish. So that gives me another direction to look in. Getting records out of Cuba isn't very easy!
The name cold also be Galician (gallego/galego). Basque Country is relatively close to Galicia, and the Galician language also uses the "e" as in Portuguese. Check out Galician regional cities such as Vigo orA Coruna as possible places of origin.
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Old 02-22-2014, 10:16 AM
 
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i did my dna to 111 markers on the y test, and match with hundreds, close to thousand of people with a common surname in scotland, out of all those matches, about 75 are 100% match 111 out of 111 markers.

well the deal is, the surname is not mine, not even close, but my surname can't be found in scotland. also every one i found in united states with my surname can be trace back to one guy in 1640
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