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Old 07-13-2017, 07:26 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,483 posts, read 26,078,274 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by residinghere2007 View Post
My mom's stepfather died of TB back in the 1960s and since she has been exposed, when she is skin tested, she always has a positive reaction and now just tells them to give her a chest x-ray if she needs to get it re-done for her job.
Since she already knows she tests positive she should not have a skin test at all. She will just test positive again and might even have a severe reaction to the test.

I presume she was treated when she first tested positive.

If she is at risk to be re-exposed at her job there is now a blood test that can be done instead of the skin test. The algorithm for who needs to be tested, who needs an X-ray, and who needs to be treated or re-treated is complex. An infectious disease specialist or her local public health department can advise her.
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Old 07-13-2017, 08:25 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
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Smallpox almost wiped out one ancestral line in 1870..only 2 survived. Vaccination was known and compulsory in some places but not in the Irish tenements.
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Old 07-14-2017, 02:38 PM
bjh bjh started this thread
 
Location: Memphis - home of the king
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TB wasn't just a tenement illness. It was widespread in New England, including small towns or even rural areas. If close living had anything to do with it, it might be that families were big and more people lived in a house and shared the same rooms and/or beds than would today. People still potentially encountered infection at school or church, even if they lived away from the city. If a single person didn't live in a family owned house, lodging in a boarding house was usually the alternative. There a lodger might encounter, even share a room with anyone who had been anywhere and might introduce the disease. Then they too would spread it around everywhere they coughed, sneezed, or so much as talked, or where they spit. Recently I've seen a couple of people spit in public and it reminded me of seeing old posters discouraging people from spitting in the street to limit the spread of disease. There's even a poster on the wiki page for TB.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuberculosis
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Old 07-14-2017, 08:53 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,483 posts, read 26,078,274 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bjh View Post
TB wasn't just a tenement illness. It was widespread in New England, including small towns or even rural areas. If close living had anything to do with it, it might be that families were big and more people lived in a house and shared the same rooms and/or beds than would today. People still potentially encountered infection at school or church, even if they lived away from the city. If a single person didn't live in a family owned house, lodging in a boarding house was usually the alternative. There a lodger might encounter, even share a room with anyone who had been anywhere and might introduce the disease. Then they too would spread it around everywhere they coughed, sneezed, or so much as talked, or where they spit. Recently I've seen a couple of people spit in public and it reminded me of seeing old posters discouraging people from spitting in the street to limit the spread of disease. There's even a poster on the wiki page for TB.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuberculosis
Oh, it was everywhere, but it does not spread easily by casual contact.

From your link:

"Tuberculosis is closely linked to both overcrowding and malnutrition, making it one of the principal diseases of poverty.[13] Those at high risk thus include: people who inject illicit drugs, inhabitants and employees of locales where vulnerable people gather (e.g. prisons and homeless shelters), medically underprivileged and resource-poor communities, high-risk ethnic minorities, children in close contact with high-risk category patients, and health-care providers serving these patients."
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Old 07-14-2017, 09:52 PM
 
Location: Illinois
3,168 posts, read 4,154,040 times
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Let me share a first world, 20th century TB story in my family. It may just have been my parents' hysteria.

One of my uncles, actually by marriage, was a border in a home where TB was said to have been found. This uncle, who was my mom's BIL via her sister, visited us often. All of my siblings and I had a TB skin test. The county burned down the home where he once bordered.

Anyway, one of my sisters and I had a tiff where she scratched my arm. The same arm where the TB skin test was administered. My parents took me to the doctor not knowing the cat fight. They thought that my test was positive.

TB that is present over generations IS a serious thing IMO. To this day I don't know why we ALL had to have a TB skin test. Our uncle came around often, though.
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Old 07-14-2017, 10:02 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,483 posts, read 26,078,274 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CMichele View Post
Let me share a first world, 20th century TB story in my family. It may just have been my parents' hysteria.

One of my uncles, actually by marriage, was a border in a home where TB was said to have been found. This uncle, who was my mom's BIL via her sister, visited us often. All of my siblings and I had a TB skin test. The county burned down the home where he once bordered.

Anyway, one of my sisters and I had a tiff where she scratched my arm. The same arm where the TB skin test was administered. My parents took me to the doctor not knowing the cat fight. They thought that my test was positive.

TB that is present over generations IS a serious thing IMO. To this day I don't know why we ALL had to have a TB skin test. Our uncle came around often, though.
Close contacts are tested so that they can be treated. Your uncle's frequent visits put you in that risk group, if he tested positive. A positive test indicates that infection with TB has happened. The bacteria can lay dormant for a long time without causing symptoms. Treatment during that phase of the disease, called latent tuberculosis, can prevent it from ever becoming active.

I have never heard of destroying a home because someone with TB lived there. It's not necessary. If the county burned the house, there was some other reason for it or someone over reacted.
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Old 07-14-2017, 10:17 PM
 
Location: Illinois
3,168 posts, read 4,154,040 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
Close contacts are tested so that they can be treated. Your uncle's frequent visits put you in that risk group, if he tested positive. A positive test indicates that infection with TB has happened. The bacteria can lay dormant for a long time without causing symptoms. Treatment during that phase of the disease, called latent tuberculosis, can prevent it from ever becoming active.

I have never heard of destroying a home because someone with TB lived there. It's not necessary. If the county burned the house, there was some other reason for it or someone over reacted.
Then they overreacted. This is a true story.

My uncle spent more time with us than his own children (our first cousins).

I don't think that 20+ years ago that TB was the yeah, okay disease that some are saying here. It surely wasn't 100+ years ago. JMO.

And I work in an Allied Healthcare field today and give sideeye to this mentality. TB is and was serious.
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Old 07-14-2017, 10:56 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,483 posts, read 26,078,274 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CMichele View Post
Then they overreacted. This is a true story.

My uncle spent more time with us than his own children (our first cousins).

I don't think that 20+ years ago that TB was the yeah, okay disease that some are saying here. It surely wasn't 100+ years ago. JMO.

And I work in an Allied Healthcare field today and give sideeye to this mentality. TB is and was serious.
Oh, it is still taken extremely seriously, especially because some strains are very resistant to treatment. Fortunately the incidence is low. About two thirds of cases are in foreign born persons, the great majority of whom are here legally.

https://www.tbfacts.org/tb-statistics-united-states/
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Old 07-15-2017, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
8,216 posts, read 12,805,062 times
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My most recent discovery was finding I am descended from someone who was involved in the Connecticut Witch Trials, which mostly predated the Salem ones: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_Comstock

Connecticut Witch Trials (America, 1647 - 1697) - Witchcraft
https://ctexplored.org/wethersfields-witch-trials/
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Old 07-15-2017, 04:40 PM
bjh bjh started this thread
 
Location: Memphis - home of the king
26,058 posts, read 22,780,245 times
Reputation: 119709
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
Oh, it was everywhere, but it does not spread easily by casual contact.

From your link:

"Tuberculosis is closely linked to both overcrowding and malnutrition, making it one of the principal diseases of poverty.[13] Those at high risk thus include: people who inject illicit drugs, inhabitants and employees of locales where vulnerable people gather (e.g. prisons and homeless shelters), medically underprivileged and resource-poor communities, high-risk ethnic minorities, children in close contact with high-risk category patients, and health-care providers serving these patients."
Yeah, I get what you/they are saying, and I was aware of the content of what I posted. My point is that though the word tenement has been used here that TB was not limited to those places or necessarily to crowded conditions to the point of grinding misery. I've seen in my own research families who were well off, not rich, but doing pretty well and living in their own homes in small towns or even rural areas who were devastated by TB.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CMichele View Post
Then they overreacted. This is a true story.

My uncle spent more time with us than his own children (our first cousins).

I don't think that 20+ years ago that TB was the yeah, okay disease that some are saying here. It surely wasn't 100+ years ago. JMO.

And I work in an Allied Healthcare field today and give sideeye to this mentality. TB is and was serious.
That's my take away too. TB is frickin' serious. When you see a couple lose all their kids or most of them. When you see a happy healthy family living their lives and a few years later half of them are gone because of TB it gets your attention. Not sure how all we managed to get it under such good control, but we're very fortunate they did.
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