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Old 06-26-2013, 07:49 PM
 
Location: Center of the universe
24,757 posts, read 32,896,894 times
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Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
All of which have been rendered impotent.
When and by whom?
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Old 06-26-2013, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
8,385 posts, read 9,947,952 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
Nelson Mandela is not an American. Therefore he cannot be an African American.
If he did had citizenship, he would be an African American.
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Old 06-26-2013, 08:20 PM
 
Location: Center of the universe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gwillyfromphilly View Post
If he did had citizenship, he would be an African American.
If he had been born in this country. Had he been an immigrant from South Africa, he'd be a South African American.
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Old 06-26-2013, 08:41 PM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucario View Post
If he had been born in this country. Had he been an immigrant from South Africa, he'd be a South African American.
That's true but either term would be correct.
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Old 06-26-2013, 08:43 PM
 
Location: West Coast
1,199 posts, read 2,113,678 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by branh0913 View Post
As a black man, I've never felt I was different than the average American. I grew up watching MTV, looking at He-Man, Star Wars, playing with actions figures, and Nintendo growing up like any American would. And though I may have been raised in a crappier neighborhood than some white kid, I pretty much grew up being influenced by the same things. And I can look back to my mother and grandmother for this as well. When my family tree was done, it was revealed I've had family in this country dating back to 1730. Nearly 300 years of being represented in this country. I would say I have been in America longer than majority of the white West Coast population has. But for some reason I have to be called African America? I must admit, I know a lot about Africa. But I didn't learn about Africa via persona experience from my parents or elders in my family. I learned about Africa by reading BBC articles or a book, just like any white American would learn about Africa. There is nothing about me that is African, and having dark skin doesn't make me African automatically. I have more in common with Bubba from the trailer park than Ubotu from some tribe in Nigeria. You can't deny I have dark skin, so at the very least call me a black American. Black is far more accurate than "African" when it comes to describing me and my family.


Sorry, I had to get that off my chest. Since I moved to Seattle, which is PC overkill, I hear that term African American more than I care to hear it. It's not offensive, but it sure as hell is misleading. Like I'm less American than some white person, when in fact I'm more American than most white people. Again, my family has been in this country far longer than theirs.
African-American means an American of African Ancestry. You don't have to recognize your African ancestry. Its your choice not to. You don't have to degrade the term African American. Many people identify themselves as such. It is a personal choice.
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Old 06-26-2013, 08:52 PM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
8,385 posts, read 9,947,952 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joy74 View Post
African-American means an American of African Ancestry. You don't have to recognize your African ancestry. Its your choice not to. You don't have to degrade the term African American. Many people identify themselves as such. It is a personal choice.
That's exactly how I feel. I also feel that I'm being scolded by some on this thread because I choose to identify as being African American.
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Old 06-26-2013, 09:20 PM
 
Location: Center of the universe
24,757 posts, read 32,896,894 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gwillyfromphilly View Post
That's true but either term would be correct.
I don't agree, chiefly because African immigrants, unless they consciously assimilate into the African American culture, are definitely a different ethnicity than African Americans.

Just as I could not move to South Africa and become a South African, a South African can't come here and instantly become African American.
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Old 06-26-2013, 09:31 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,207 posts, read 25,902,249 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thriftylefty View Post
The term African American says less about who you are and more about how you got here. Kinky hair and black skin is not that indigenous to this part of the world. Russian Jews, Scotch Irish, Austral Germans, and Volga Germans are similar to African Americans in that a historical event created their very existence.
Sigh…Woe is me, here we go again already.
Most black americans do not have black skin to begin with and please save that my ancestors were raped by slavemasters stuff. Most of us are a shade of brown from red boned to dark chocolate. Same with people in Melanesia, Southeast Asia, and even Parts of Africa. As far as what is not indigenous to this part if the world. This isn't the forum to go into that and I could state my personal beliefs but I don't feel like going back and forth with it.

Last edited by Spade; 06-26-2013 at 09:40 PM..
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Old 06-26-2013, 09:38 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,207 posts, read 25,902,249 times
Reputation: 8963
Quote:
Originally Posted by branh0913 View Post
As a black man, I've never felt I was different than the average American. I grew up watching MTV, looking at He-Man, Star Wars, playing with actions figures, and Nintendo growing up like any American would. And though I may have been raised in a crappier neighborhood than some white kid, I pretty much grew up being influenced by the same things. And I can look back to my mother and grandmother for this as well. When my family tree was done, it was revealed I've had family in this country dating back to 1730. Nearly 300 years of being represented in this country. I would say I have been in America longer than majority of the white West Coast population has. But for some reason I have to be called African America? I must admit, I know a lot about Africa. But I didn't learn about Africa via persona experience from my parents or elders in my family. I learned about Africa by reading BBC articles or a book, just like any white American would learn about Africa. There is nothing about me that is African, and having dark skin doesn't make me African automatically. I have more in common with Bubba from the trailer park than Ubotu from some tribe in Nigeria. You can't deny I have dark skin, so at the very least call me a black American. Black is far more accurate than "African" when it comes to describing me and my family.


Sorry, I had to get that off my chest. Since I moved to Seattle, which is PC overkill, I hear that term African American more than I care to hear it. It's not offensive, but it sure as hell is misleading. Like I'm less American than some white person, when in fact I'm more American than most white people. Again, my family has been in this country far longer than theirs.
From my understanding by a friend in Cali. He said Tupac hated the term african American like its somehow was to make us more in tune with who we actually are. Take that fwiw. I do know he voiced his opinion on it in the Indiana Black Expo. Point is, you're not alone on this bruh.
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Old 06-26-2013, 10:11 PM
 
31,385 posts, read 31,051,757 times
Reputation: 14878
Quote:
Originally Posted by branh0913 View Post
And again, how does this explain WHITES in the south having the same linguistical patterns?
JSTOR: An Error Occurred Setting Your User Cookie

Quote:
There are NO differences between black southern baptist worship or white southern baptist.
Now I know that you are clueless.

Quote:
Listen to early blues and country, and there are very few differences besides the color of the performer.
Origins of the blues - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Quote:
Musical signatures and rythms were completely the same.
Wrong again, country uses more major scale than standard blues. Blues uses more blue notes. Traditional country uses more major scale and traditional blues is more blues scale, using minors with the flat 3rds, 7ths.

By the way look up the origins of the banjo.

Now tell me these are the same both are from the same era and both feature the major innovators of their respective genre.

WRECK OF THE OLD 97 by Vernon Dalhart 1924 - YouTube

Robert Johnson - The Complete Recordings (Full Album) - YouTube

Quote:
Remember blues and country CAME from old gospel in the south.
Strike three, actually four. Listen to African call and response, the check out slave work songs and get back to me... strike that.

Here's a few more examples

Children of Bukati Aids Project. - YouTube

Negro Work Songs & Calls - Early In The Mornin'.wmv - YouTube

Medley of Old School Gospel Music - YouTube

Last edited by ovcatto; 06-26-2013 at 10:34 PM..
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