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Old 07-06-2013, 11:15 PM
 
Location: Center of the universe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tcrackly View Post
My White anthropology professor was a former Kenyan citizen of English descent before he escaped the purges of Idi Amin. He liked to refer to himself as African-American or Kenyan-American. This is America. One still has the choice to choose what terms we wish to identify ourselves by.
Idi Amin was not the leader of Kenya. But your prof was certainly Kenyan or Kenyan American.
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Old 07-07-2013, 07:48 AM
 
Location: Way South of the Volvo Line
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I did not state whether Idi Amin was leader or not. Amin and his military corps were responsible for many atrocities and deaths which prompted the emmigration of many Ugandans and surrounding peoples. My former professor was living in Uganda at the time.
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Old 07-07-2013, 08:23 AM
 
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I'm not African American so maybe I don't relate, but it seems the same to me when you talk about European American. It's like, I'm an American. My only ties to Europe are pretty distant, and I'd imagine black people may feel the same way about Africa, but I could be wrong.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ArkansasSlim View Post
All these posts have been interesting with their individual points of view. I just read in National Geographic an interesting story about the Australian Aboriginals. Their skin is very black, so if they were walking down a street here in the US of A, which term would be used to identify them?
They'd likely be mistaken for black.
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Old 07-07-2013, 08:35 AM
 
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It’s always interesting to hear about White people from Africa who call themselves Africans. Although Africans have been in Great Britain since the 15th or 16th century, I doubt today a Black person born in Great Britain would be referred to as an Englishmen.

I recently heard a Nigerian author interviewed on NPR. She really had no use for the word "Black" to describer herself. It seem it says nothing about you and you can only be black in contrast to some one else being white. If you live where there is no white people no one is black. Africans have to learned to be black in America.
'Americanah' Author Explains 'Learning' To Be Black In The U.S. : NPR


I'm suprised young progressive African Americans have a problem with the term African American. They can't relate to Africa so they willingly accept the term "Black" even though it is the generic term most western countries use to define people from Africa.

Last edited by thriftylefty; 07-07-2013 at 09:56 AM..
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Old 07-07-2013, 04:35 PM
 
Location: Way South of the Volvo Line
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BBC - History - British History in depth: The First Black Britons

Black people in Ireland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 07-07-2013, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Center of the universe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tcrackly View Post
I did not state whether Idi Amin was leader or not. Amin and his military corps were responsible for many atrocities and deaths which prompted the emmigration of many Ugandans and surrounding peoples. My former professor was living in Uganda at the time.
Understood. I was confused about what you were saying because your earlier post didn't point out what connections your professor might have had with what was happening with Idi Amin or Uganda.
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Old 07-08-2013, 04:04 AM
 
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Originally Posted by tcrackly View Post
I'm a big time fan of Ireland's Phil Lynott (lead singer Thin Lizzy) infact i'd rather listen to him than Jimi Hendrix .
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Old 07-18-2013, 08:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rainroosty View Post
It IS stupid. You are a negro. Or black, if you prefer. Or whatever. But African American is stupid for the reasons that you said.
Negro? I'm sorry but did you step out of the 1950s...yup guess so, it's that backwoods water

OP, I understand your perspective, I'm black and Italian but I think the idea of still being referred as African American is ridiculous and although some statistics will call an Italian, Italian-American, or Irish-American most can get by, by just referring to themselves as American (if they are second generation and on). Most "African Americans" wouldn't know how to integrate into African Society and Culture. Most, would tell you they believe the common thought that Africa is nothing but a jungle and that all Africans must have lived in a jungle growing up (Iman told a famous story about this ).

But, I will have to disagree with you...I would NOT like and do not like to be considered Black. I think being called black is just ridiculous, because no one's black...sure we've got some dark people but no one is actually black just like no one is actually white although a few pale people come to mind...

I'm not sure what I would like to be deemed by, as I personally believe these labels are limiting and only succeed in pitting us against one another; but I do understand them. People need to be able to categorize things, as it's an innate quality of our human character.

Hmm perhaps I would prefer to just be considered brown--golden brown maybe more specifically for me.

I wonder why Indians say they're brown...it's kind of insulting because I mean aren't most blacks brown?
Idk, it's all silly but we have to deal with it...
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Old 07-18-2013, 08:29 PM
 
49 posts, read 54,169 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thriftylefty View Post
It’s always interesting to hear about White people from Africa who call themselves Africans. Although Africans have been in Great Britain since the 15th or 16th century, I doubt today a Black person born in Great Britain would be referred to as an Englishmen.

I recently heard a Nigerian author interviewed on NPR. She really had no use for the word "Black" to describer herself. It seem it says nothing about you and you can only be black in contrast to some one else being white. If you live where there is no white people no one is black. Africans have to learned to be black in America.
'Americanah' Author Explains 'Learning' To Be Black In The U.S. : NPR


I'm suprised young progressive African Americans have a problem with the term African American. They can't relate to Africa so they willingly accept the term "Black" even though it is the generic term most western countries use to define people from Africa.

This is a wonderful point. I agree, to use the term...no, to willfully accept the term "black," as a word to describe who you are is ridiculous to me, because your skin tone is such a small, minor, and insignificant detail of who you are. Although, I can't relate to being an AA because I'm not from Africa and know little to none about African culture, I can identify to my parents heritage. But, we have to be kidding ourselves that the government will make self-identification simpler, by allowing individuals to choose Irish-Italian-American or Welsh English American; it's just toooo much!

The best thing to do is to embrace all of who you are and acknowledge each and every part of your heritage. If you are 100% African, white or black, embrace it. If you are black, italian or black hispanic, embrace both cultures.

But don't just willingly accept a label that chooses only to define you by color, when you can identify yourself with something so much more enriching.
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Old 07-19-2013, 08:01 AM
 
7,899 posts, read 3,724,574 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PacoMartin View Post
In the 1700's Carolus Linnaeus recognized four main races: white race, yellow race, red race, and the black race. His student added the brown race, to form the five color typology for humans.

Red and Yellow have long since been dropped from most casual speech as racist. "Brown" remains neutral, and is only sometimes perceived as racist. Some people would like to drop "white", but the census bureau suggest that Middle Eastern people classify themselves as "white". Since the term "Middle East" is very vague to begin with, local activist groups try to get Iranians to check "other" and write in "Iranian" as further detail. They are primarily concerned with getting government recognition and funding which they don't get if people check "white". So "European-American" is not the equivalent to "white".

Modern science does not recognize groupings of various ethnic groups into "races". Certainly Africa has more genetic diversity than the rest of the world combined, as it was occupied for the longest period of time. Mankind's native coloration was almost certainly dark, and "white skin" is really "thin skin" was adopted in climates where Vitamin D was difficult to come by from sunlight exposure. The reason that Siberians, and native Alaskans are still dark is that they consume large amounts of Vitamin D in fish, and natural selection did not favor the thin skinned.


But more to your point, the "hyphenated American" a hundred years ago was a type of insult, implying that an "Italian- American" was less of a "pure American" as someone with northern European geneology. The hyphenated American concept began in the mid 19th century. The earlier groups of Germans and Swedes, and Czechs were not referred to as such. The hyphenated American style gradually morphed into a point of pride, and usually applied to a bloodline that had been in the USA for less than 5 generations. The application of the term to descendants of the slaves is a ridiculous affectation.
Teddy Roosevelt said flat out that "there is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism".
I fully agree with him, and it is one of the reasons our society is more polarized than ever I can recall in my lifetime.

The liberal media continues to push and promote the term for minorities, yet white people who may have ancestors from other parts of the world are just called white. Even though my ancestors come from Ireland, I don't go around demanding I be called an "Irish-American", nor would any liberal be willing to call me such. Yet they will trip all over themselves to call a minority by their ethnic identity.

Furthermore, even a white person born in Africa, whether it be Zimbabwe or South Africa is not afforded the same fawning over their designation. Heck there is that infamous case where a white South African checked off "African American" on a questionnaire and was given preferential treatment only to later be denied it, once it was determined he "was not really African-American".
He rightly pointed out that even though he had become an American citizen, he had more right to claim being an "African-American" than any native born person in this country.


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