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Old 06-25-2013, 08:30 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
If she was born in Africa, she's African. Not all African natives/residents are black.

What about Egyptians and other people from northern Africa? Are they not African, even though many may be Caucasian? Then if an Egyptian moves to the United States, shouldn't s/he be African-American as well?
Just because someone moves to the United States, that does not make them a U.S. citizen. They would have to become naturalized. Otherwise, they would still be called German or French, etc. even though they reside in America.
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Old 06-25-2013, 08:35 PM
 
6,868 posts, read 6,947,505 times
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Default Asians

Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post

I don't know what to call anyone anymore, what's considered correct or PC, what offends someone and should they even feel offended. It's confusing. I call black people "black people." We used to call them negroes, then that changed to black and then that changed to Afro or African Americans. Whites are called either whites or caucasians. Asians? What do we call them? Orientals?

Sometimes I wish someone (who???) would decide for once and for all. If we wait a few millenia then maybe everyone will be intermarried and there won't be any need for racial terminology.
My daughter told me that Orientals are rugs and Asians are people!! After we heard that it was easy...
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Old 06-25-2013, 08:46 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,646 posts, read 18,711,668 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by staywarm2 View Post
My daughter told me that Orientals are rugs and Asians are people!! After we heard that it was easy...
I don't know what to make of that.

Another thing--in the UK the name "Asians" refers to people who come from Pakistan. All I wish is that there could be standard terms for the races, terms that most people could agree on--and that it would stick and not keep changing. The OP made a lot of sense.
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Old 06-25-2013, 08:47 PM
 
31,385 posts, read 32,026,059 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by branh0913 View Post
But I didn't learn about Africa via persona experience from my parents or elders in my family. I learned about Africa by reading BBC articles or a book, just like any white American would learn about Africa. There is nothing about me that is African, and having dark skin doesn't make me African automatically. I have more in common with Bubba from the trailer park than Ubotu from some tribe in Nigeria. You can't deny I have dark skin, so at the very least call me a black American. Black is far more accurate than "African" when it comes to describing me and my family.
Quote:
Originally Posted by branh0913 View Post
Have you ever been to Africa? Is that where your family is from? Any recent relatives that you've met actually come from there? If not, then I have no idea why you would identify with a continent you've never been to, and that you would know nothing about without reading information about it
The term is stupid in direct relationship to the ignorance of the person making the argument and is in part of the reason why the term gained prominence in the first place. Now I have no intention of going into a long drawn out explanation of the history of the term, we have covered that rather extensively on this forum, other than to say that the term can be traced back to 1853. If the argument that African American is the product of political correctness then clearly those who prefer to be referred to as black yet denigrate African American have failed to recognize that "Black" is also the product of very recent political coinage, because prior to the late 60's the terms most acceptable persons of African descent were either "colored" or in more refined circles, Negro. So you see, either term you use is fraught with political implications whether you like it or aware of it or not.

Take for example the common argument that as "American's" you have no connection with African's or the Africa. Yet by doing so, you've have either denied or exhibited an ignorance of the African culture roots still running through the culture of the descendants of the African Diaspora. "Black" music, foods, dance, and language hold remnants of our African past, a past shaped and transformed by our American cultural experiences and history. Because of that, the term "black" that was raised as a militant call for African American unity was found lacking it recognizing that cultural heritage. A heritage that has become as Americanized as it has transformed the majority culture in which it evolved.

When one denigrates the term African American one denigrates the American culture of African descendants as typified by statements such as those that have been posted above. When one calls oneself an African American, one does with full knowledge that we are Americans, but Americans who understand the origins of our journey and evolution through American history. Be that as it may... you can call yourselves what ever you want, just don't denigrate those of us who appreciate our culture.
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Old 06-25-2013, 09:08 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
4,366 posts, read 5,120,626 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ovcatto View Post
The term is stupid in direct relationship to the ignorance of the person making the argument and is in part of the reason why the term gained prominence in the first place. Now I have no intention of going into a long drawn out explanation of the history of the term, we have covered that rather extensively on this forum, other than to say that the term can be traced back to 1853. If the argument that African American is the product of political correctness then clearly those who prefer to be referred to as black yet denigrate African American have failed to recognize that "Black" is also the product of very recent political coinage, because prior to the late 60's the terms most acceptable persons of African descent were either "colored" or in more refined circles, Negro. So you see, either term you use is fraught with political implications whether you like it or aware of it or not.

Take for example the common argument that as "American's" you have no connection with African's or the Africa. Yet by doing so, you've have either denied or exhibited an ignorance of the African culture roots still running through the culture of the descendants of the African Diaspora. "Black" music, foods, dance, and language hold remnants of our African past, a past shaped and transformed by our American cultural experiences and history. Because of that, the term "black" that was raised as a militant call for African American unity was found lacking it recognizing that cultural heritage. A heritage that has become as Americanized as it has transformed the majority culture in which it evolved.

When one denigrates the term African American one denigrates the American culture of African descendants as typified by statements such as those that have been posted above. When one calls oneself an African American, one does with full knowledge that we are Americans, but Americans who understand the origins of our journey and evolution through American history. Be that as it may... you can call yourselves what ever you want, just don't denigrate those of us who appreciate our culture.
This is the funny thing. People say the term should be kept alive because black Americans are practicing some culture heavily influenced by AFrica. When this is hardly true, but black intellectuals would have you believe this. It is quite amazing that linguistics have not been carried over from Africa at ALL yet it seems like all of these other "customs" have been carried over. I would think it would be harder to get rid of the linguistics aspect of a culture than any other customs. Yet there is no linguistical ties to the Black American and Africa YET we somehow kept all of these other traditions. To be real with you, anyone who is intellectually honest in the slightest can see anything that is considered "black culture" is really just talking about American culture.

One of the popular points that black intellectuals try to make is about gospel music, and the old negro spirituals, to make it seem as if it is an African thing. But if one look at old hymns out of Ireland, you'll find similarities. Blues is more than likely derived from Irish Folk music, as Irish were often the whites who interacted with blacks the most. And again one must ask why didn't any religions survive in America from black slaves, again you would think it would be harder to take someone's religion from them. How did busy slave owners teach black slaves Christanity? Again, it came from Ireland. A ton of black culture draws some really strong similarities to underclass Irish culture.

Have you noticed earlier in the 20th century that Blue and Country sounded almost completely the same? Did white people steal blues from blacks? Or did two underclass groups simply develop a musical style because they essentially were influenced by the same culture? Again, black intellectual revisionist nonsense desperately try to tie a ton of black culture to Africa, but all one has to do is read about African culture, and one will see zero similarities.

If you're celebrating African culture as it relates to the Black American, you're celebrating an absolute farce. There are enough holes in such suppositions to put such an assertion under well deserved scrutiny.
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Old 06-25-2013, 09:16 PM
 
Location: SW Kansas
1,787 posts, read 3,422,416 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by branh0913 View Post
As a black man, I've never felt I was different than the average American. I grew up watching MTV, looking at He-Man, Star Wars, playing with actions figures, and Nintendo growing up like any American would. And though I may have been raised in a crappier neighborhood than some white kid, I pretty much grew up being influenced by the same things. And I can look back to my mother and grandmother for this as well. When my family tree was done, it was revealed I've had family in this country dating back to 1730. Nearly 300 years of being represented in this country. I would say I have been in America longer than majority of the white West Coast population has. But for some reason I have to be called African America? I must admit, I know a lot about Africa. But I didn't learn about Africa via persona experience from my parents or elders in my family. I learned about Africa by reading BBC articles or a book, just like any white American would learn about Africa. There is nothing about me that is African, and having dark skin doesn't make me African automatically. I have more in common with Bubba from the trailer park than Ubotu from some tribe in Nigeria. You can't deny I have dark skin, so at the very least call me a black American. Black is far more accurate than "African" when it comes to describing me and my family.


Sorry, I had to get that off my chest. Since I moved to Seattle, which is PC overkill, I hear that term African American more than I care to hear it. It's not offensive, but it sure as hell is misleading. Like I'm less American than some white person, when in fact I'm more American than most white people. Again, my family has been in this country far longer than theirs.
Yes. Your family has been here longer than mine! "We've" only been here since my great-grandfather and great-grandmother moved here.

I don't know why we can't use "descriptives" instead of noting heritage. Far be it for me to tell the difference between an Irish-American from an English-American. A battle was fought to desegregate, now it feels like all that is being undone by the PC requirement to label people as other than AMERICAN.

My Dad was in the Navy so I was raised all over the world and in many States. I lived in Virginia during the Black Power movement. I remember "black" as a word used to show respect. I still think that way.
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Old 06-25-2013, 09:59 PM
 
Location: Miami, Florida
320 posts, read 478,245 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by branh0913 View Post
As a black man, I've never felt I was different than the average American. I grew up watching MTV, looking at He-Man, Star Wars, playing with actions figures, and Nintendo growing up like any American would. And though I may have been raised in a crappier neighborhood than some white kid, I pretty much grew up being influenced by the same things. And I can look back to my mother and grandmother for this as well. When my family tree was done, it was revealed I've had family in this country dating back to 1730. Nearly 300 years of being represented in this country. I would say I have been in America longer than majority of the white West Coast population has. But for some reason I have to be called African America? I must admit, I know a lot about Africa. But I didn't learn about Africa via persona experience from my parents or elders in my family. I learned about Africa by reading BBC articles or a book, just like any white American would learn about Africa. There is nothing about me that is African, and having dark skin doesn't make me African automatically. I have more in common with Bubba from the trailer park than Ubotu from some tribe in Nigeria. You can't deny I have dark skin, so at the very least call me a black American. Black is far more accurate than "African" when it comes to describing me and my family.


Sorry, I had to get that off my chest. Since I moved to Seattle, which is PC overkill, I hear that term African American more than I care to hear it. It's not offensive, but it sure as hell is misleading. Like I'm less American than some white person, when in fact I'm more American than most white people. Again, my family has been in this country far longer than theirs.
North African are caucasians.

you are Central African U.S. American.

you are called that way becaus e your ancestors are from that continent.

similar to european u.s.americans, for example 99 percent of italian u.s. americans cant say 2 words in italian, they only know pizza.
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Old 06-25-2013, 10:09 PM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
8,482 posts, read 10,430,026 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex =] View Post
North African are caucasians.

you are Central African U.S. American.

you are called that way becaus e your ancestors are from that continent.

similar to european u.s.americans, for example 99 percent of italian u.s. americans cant say 2 words in italian, they only know pizza.
So what! They are still Italian Americans even if they don't speak the language of Italy. So that's a weak argument on your part.
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Old 06-25-2013, 10:46 PM
 
Location: Chicago area
1,105 posts, read 2,899,352 times
Reputation: 2106
Quote:
Originally Posted by branh0913 View Post
As a black man, I've never felt I was different than the average American. I grew up watching MTV, looking at He-Man, Star Wars, playing with actions figures, and Nintendo growing up like any American would. And though I may have been raised in a crappier neighborhood than some white kid, I pretty much grew up being influenced by the same things. And I can look back to my mother and grandmother for this as well. When my family tree was done, it was revealed I've had family in this country dating back to 1730. Nearly 300 years of being represented in this country. I would say I have been in America longer than majority of the white West Coast population has. But for some reason I have to be called African America? I must admit, I know a lot about Africa. But I didn't learn about Africa via persona experience from my parents or elders in my family. I learned about Africa by reading BBC articles or a book, just like any white American would learn about Africa. There is nothing about me that is African, and having dark skin doesn't make me African automatically. I have more in common with Bubba from the trailer park than Ubotu from some tribe in Nigeria. You can't deny I have dark skin, so at the very least call me a black American. Black is far more accurate than "African" when it comes to describing me and my family.


Sorry, I had to get that off my chest. Since I moved to Seattle, which is PC overkill, I hear that term African American more than I care to hear it. It's not offensive, but it sure as hell is misleading. Like I'm less American than some white person, when in fact I'm more American than most white people. Again, my family has been in this country far longer than theirs.
I fully agree with you. The term is absurd and discriminating. To me, calling black Americans with no connections to Africa "African American" is sending the message that they are not full Americans. According to current American terminology the only people who are fully American are the whites. Everyone else is partly something else, like Asian American, Mexican American, Native Americans. If these terms were valid whites would be called European Americans but we're not.
It's, in my opinion, absurd to refer to people by the place where a very distant relative was born and that they have no connection to. In fact many black Americans have more European blood than African. There is nothing African about black Americans. Heck, some, like people of all ethnicities, believe that Africa is a country.
The term African American is so othering that I'm surprised that those who would fit into this category accepts it. I'm equally surprised that Native Americans accept their label considering that they are the only ones that should be able to call themselves Americans without the add-on.

Barack Obama is African American - half African, half American. All the others are Americans.
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Old 06-25-2013, 11:13 PM
 
Location: Chicago area
1,105 posts, read 2,899,352 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex =] View Post
North African are caucasians.

you are Central African U.S. American.

you are called that way becaus e your ancestors are from that continent.

.
How do you know that the OP's ancestors were from central Africa?
Since the majority of black Americans also have white ancestors from Europe wouldn't it then be more accurate to call them European-African-American?
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