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Old 06-26-2013, 06:15 AM
 
Location: Center of the universe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by branh0913 View Post
Have you ever been to Africa? Is that where your family is from? Any recent relatives that you've met actually come from there? If not, then I have no idea why you would identify with a continent you've never been to, and that you would know nothing about without reading information about it
Irrelevant. There are Chinese and Japanese Americans who have never been to their ancestral countries, yet nobody stresses them for calling themselves Chinese or Japanese Americans.


I am an African American. There is no place on Earth called "Blackia."
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Old 06-26-2013, 06:16 AM
 
Location: Center of the universe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gwillyfromphilly View Post
That's nice but that's not what the OP is referring to. He is talking about racial identity.
Not racial identity. Ethnic identity.
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Old 06-26-2013, 06:17 AM
 
Location: Center of the universe
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Originally Posted by EnricoV View Post
So it's an appropriate term for black Americans, whose family may have been in the Americas for 400-500 years but not for a woman who's citizenship is African and whose residence may be in America?

Besides, if you go back far enough, aren't we all descended from people who lived on the African continent?
She is a South African, a Boer. Not an African. Her tribe violently enforced the distinction for centuries.
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Old 06-26-2013, 06:18 AM
 
Location: Center of the universe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
If she was born in Africa, she's African. Not all African natives/residents are black.

What about Egyptians and other people from northern Africa? Are they not African, even though many may be Caucasian? Then if an Egyptian moves to the United States, shouldn't s/he be African-American as well?
No. Egyptian American.
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Old 06-26-2013, 06:28 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by branh0913 View Post
As a black man, I've never felt I was different than the average American. I grew up watching MTV, looking at He-Man, Star Wars, playing with actions figures, and Nintendo growing up like any American would. And though I may have been raised in a crappier neighborhood than some white kid, I pretty much grew up being influenced by the same things. And I can look back to my mother and grandmother for this as well. When my family tree was done, it was revealed I've had family in this country dating back to 1730. Nearly 300 years of being represented in this country. I would say I have been in America longer than majority of the white West Coast population has. But for some reason I have to be called African America? I must admit, I know a lot about Africa. But I didn't learn about Africa via persona experience from my parents or elders in my family. I learned about Africa by reading BBC articles or a book, just like any white American would learn about Africa. There is nothing about me that is African, and having dark skin doesn't make me African automatically. I have more in common with Bubba from the trailer park than Ubotu from some tribe in Nigeria. You can't deny I have dark skin, so at the very least call me a black American. Black is far more accurate than "African" when it comes to describing me and my family.
Sorry, I had to get that off my chest. Since I moved to Seattle, which is PC overkill, I hear that term African American more than I care to hear it. It's not offensive, but it sure as hell is misleading. Like I'm less American than some white person, when in fact I'm more American than most white people. Again, my family has been in this country far longer than theirs.
I am not surprised that you feel this way about your ethnic background; however, if you were to go way back in your family history you just might learn that your roots do come from Africa. Why would you be offended with this? Why would you be tired of hearing about it? In all honesty, I don't consider your race "black" either..your skin is various shades of BROWN if anything.
Me? I am considered "white" but if you look at my skin, it is really a peach color or perhaps even pink...I am called "white" because I am not "black"..WHO CARES???
I have been raised in a city that is so well mixed with different races that you don't seem to hear much with regard to the Afro American description, Black or any other color. We all seem to socialize on an equal level and everyone seems to get along just fine.
Now, you have probably heard us "white folk" say this a million times over but with me at age 65 it is the honest to God's truth. My best friend, I call her Tilly is black (dark brown actually) and we talk about this kind of stuff all the time. She raised 4 of her own kids, 6 of her grandkids from a daughter who was into drugs and more and her grandkids are all mixed kids. As she tells me..she has two that are "white", two that are "tan" and two that are "black"...they are all gorgeous, smart, wonderful kids...all 10 of them in total. Her husband is from South Carolina with roots going back to Africa and at age 78 he can work circles around anyone I know no matter what color they are. He has his own landscaping business and has helped support all 10 of those kids.
Look, learn to not see anyone's color..mine, yours, that hillbilly from down south or anyone else who crosses your path. Feel blessed that God has given you this life on earth and take your talents and intelligence in a different direction that is not so focused on skin color. Life gets so much easier when we lose ourselves in who people are and see how much they actually have to give beyond being a certain "color". Take it from an old "PINK" lady...this works.
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Old 06-26-2013, 06:31 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Lucario View Post
Irrelevant. There are Chinese and Japanese Americans who have never been to their ancestral countries, yet nobody stresses them for calling themselves Chinese or Japanese Americans.
I am an African American. There is no place on Earth called "Blackia."
I like your post!! There is no place on Earth called WHITEOBIA, PINKOBIA, TANOBIA or any other skin color that people come in. Bottom line nice to see someone say I AM AN AFRICAN AMERICAN. Nothing wrong with being proud and it takes the color distinction out of the whole issue. Good for you!!
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Old 06-26-2013, 06:31 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gwillyfromphilly View Post
Culturally they can see themselves as African but from an ancestral perspective, they are not African. If they come to the United States they are not considered African American, which is how it should be.
Caucasians have lived in Africa for centuries. Are they not African?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucario View Post
No. Egyptian American.
Is Egypt not on the continent of Africa? Are only black Africans considered African?

Do you see where your illogical argument is breaking down?
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Old 06-26-2013, 06:55 AM
 
Location: Southern California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kharing View Post
Negro....really? What year are we living in!
And that's another thing. Terms change over time. How do we know at what point a new label is in and the old label is out? In my father's time, it was "Negro", and that's the term he still uses. The generation before him used the other "n" word. I grew up with "Negro", then "Afro-American" and "Black". A generation below me says "African American". People should be able to choose whatever they're comfortable with without someone saying, "No, you're not that."
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Old 06-26-2013, 07:02 AM
 
Location: Center of the universe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Caucasians have lived in Africa for centuries. Are they not African?
Sure. But their heritage has nothing to do with African Americans or their culture of history.

Quote:
Is Egypt not on the continent of Africa? Are only black Africans considered African?

Do you see where your illogical argument is breaking down?
Actually, my logic is unassailable. The definition of the term African American goes beyond simple nomenclature.

Only those of black African descent can be African American.

An African American is a person descended from a distinct culture that developed primarily in the U.S. South among people of black African origins who were brought to that area of the United States involuntarily via the Middle Passage. We use the term "African" with "American" because 1. we have no knowledge of which distinctive country or culture in Africa we came from and 2. we are a combination of many African ethnic groups and cultural heritages.

This is distinguished from people of recent African origin or immigrants to America from the continent, who would be Nigerian American, or Kenyan American, or Egyptian American.

Those of recent African or Afro-Caribbean origin who consciously assimilate into or identify as African American can also identify as such.
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Old 06-26-2013, 07:04 AM
 
Location: Center of the universe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TribalCat View Post
And that's another thing. Terms change over time. How do we know at what point a new label is in and the old label is out? In my father's time, it was "Negro", and that's the term he still uses. The generation before him used the other "n" word. I grew up with "Negro", then "Afro-American" and "Black". A generation below me says "African American". People should be able to choose whatever they're comfortable with without someone saying, "No, you're not that."
First of all, we determine what we are called - nobody else. I'm here to tell you that we never used the "other 'n' word" to describe ourselves, so I'll forget you even said that,
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