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Old 09-04-2013, 12:00 PM
 
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I was disappointed to see them return to the "one ancestor" format with Trisha Yearwood. Sure he was interesting, as was the historical info on England's forest laws and transportation of convicts. But they didn't need a whole hour on Samuel.
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Old 09-04-2013, 04:32 PM
Status: "happy again, no longer catless! t...." (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: Cushing OK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TracySam View Post
I was disappointed to see them return to the "one ancestor" format with Trisha Yearwood. Sure he was interesting, as was the historical info on England's forest laws and transportation of convicts. But they didn't need a whole hour on Samuel.
I'm thinking its the format, since TLC is about people programs now. I can enjoy it in those terms. The history was very intreging, especially the parts about Georgia and I'm going to do some notes on that so I can go hunting for the lost reference. And I'll bet Samuel ended up in either NC or Maryland, the two top destinations for convicts. The commerse there was almost entirely tabacco farms which are very hard labor. Runaways were common but Samuel was lucky he didn't get caught since after a beating it added years to a purchase.

I kind of like how, using records, they build the life of this one person instead of listing multiple others. I've done that with my fivexggrandfather. I feel like I can see him as a person. Without all the rest he would be a leftover from the old estate system who ended up stealing for a living and got tossed away. But I can appreciate like her that without that he would have died someway in London a nothing, not traveled through history and doggedly looked forward and left his sons all some land. Fascinating how the awful and the positive share so much.

I find discovering a lot about one ancestor makes me want to know that much about all of them.
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Old 09-04-2013, 06:32 PM
 
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But with that O'Donnell guy, they did multiple generations of ancestors. So I can still hold out hope.
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Old 09-04-2013, 10:50 PM
Status: "happy again, no longer catless! t...." (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: Cushing OK
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Originally Posted by TracySam View Post
But with that O'Donnell guy, they did multiple generations of ancestors. So I can still hold out hope.

With Samuel, as they were probably pesantry, except for the very basic, there might not be much information about previous generations. With my fivexggrandfather there are references back some two hundred years before, occasional parish records, but its just names and occupations. You can see how the village changed as two merged and they were swallowed by London, but not much more than that. It wouldn't take up much time to explain. Like with Samuel, my fivexggrandfather was the first to literally leave for a different life. Since he did, leaving behind a court record and a sale record and he's on a shipping list, and various records of land deeds in Pennsulvania, etc. His life can be filled out. Before thought there are names, you don't know much more than that.

Telling Samuel's story probably had a lot more interest than preceeding generations to others, though he likely has a list of his older known ancestors. Not everyone can show a long list of past ancestors past some very significant event.
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Old 09-04-2013, 11:07 PM
 
Location: The beautiful Garden State
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Originally Posted by TracySam View Post
I was actually impressed that Cindy Crawford seemed kind of smart....At least compared to the other celebs this season. She could be a total dolt, who knows? But compared to O'Donnell and Clarkson, she came off like a rocket-surgeon.
Cindy was the valedictorian of her high school class and received an academic scholarship to study engineering at Northwestern. She dropped out of college because her modeling career was going so well (she started modeling in high school.)

Beautiful and smart. Quite a combination.
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Old 09-05-2013, 06:54 AM
 
Location: NW Philly Burbs
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I'd be interested in seeing a "behind the scenes" version of the show. What we see is a neat presentation of the facts, all tied up in a bow, that seems to happen over a few days. How many months of digging and searching were done my how many researchers to find these interesting ancestors? I'd love to know how they verify their facts, that THIS John Smith is the one associated with the celebrity, and not all the other John Smith's out there.
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Old 09-05-2013, 01:13 PM
Status: "Even better than okay" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
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Originally Posted by nightbird47 View Post
Very interesting show tonight. The flip side of Charlemaine. I'll have to rewatch and take a few notes too. Now, my convict ancestor came in 1719. He didn't get to run away. Being in the first convict shipment, they probably got watched close. But I've seen refs to Green county GA on dad's side in that era. I'll have to check out the dates.

It was interesting to see a story so close to my ancestor's. I wonder if any of hers knew any of mine.
Well, they say everyone is the descendant of a slave and of a king. Maybe they should add "convicts", too! My great-grandfather was in prison before he came here. And not because of some innocent mistake, either.
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Old 09-05-2013, 02:39 PM
Status: "happy again, no longer catless! t...." (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: Cushing OK
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Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
Well, they say everyone is the descendant of a slave and of a king. Maybe they should add "convicts", too! My great-grandfather was in prison before he came here. And not because of some innocent mistake, either.
Between 1718 and the Revolutionary war, the British transported fifty thousand convicts to the atlantic coast. It was the lesser option from hanging. The real baddies didn't get it. Often it involved property theft which was considered more than very minor. My getcgrandfather sold his loot and was to hang but argued his own way out of the sentence.

Thing is they did arrive as slaves, at least under the same conditions. The dispersment document from the ship my gfx? was on list each as a sale to an owner. The companies which ran the convict trade were the same which ran the African slave trade. The only difference in method was that there were more guards with convicts since they were more likely to take the boat. In such cases the crew was dispatched and the boat run to ground and the cargo melted away. The other difference was they made even more money off the trade than they did in Africans with the prepaid compensation for each convict as they stepped on the boat, if they died or not.

They used virtually the same restraint system, though it was not unknown to crowd more convicts in haphazardly since the bounty paid by the British government for 'costs' already made it profitable and if more died than normal they didn't lose any.

Convicts were also seperate from those who came to under an indenture. They were suspect. They often brought disease like gaol fever, which was a viriluent form of typhoid which spread quickly. They were also often thieves and suspected of continuing their trade. Convicts were often worked with slaves and housed with them as they were of lesser status than regular indentured. They were generally not welcomed into society after working their time. And the death rate was higher with them than other 'servants' as they were disposable.

Both indentured servants, convicts and the first life indentured ran when possible, but a good many ended up far worse off. This is how the first life indentured africans became the first offical 'slaves'.

All the laws later used against runaway slaves were established to control runaways of the 'servant' or convict kind long before.

After the revolution, Britsh boats contaiing more convicts were turned away and eventually they opened Australia as a new dumping ground.

So there are many many many people here now with ancestors dating back to prerevolutionary times who are descendents of convict who came via a parallel slave system. But we have to remember that at the time even children were hung and thievery was considered by many as simply a way to survive.

Truth is unless your ancestor was the privilidged exception, if they came before the revolution, even possibly after, likely they arrived under some kind of ownership since very few could pay their own way.
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Old 09-05-2013, 06:37 PM
 
Location: in the sticks, SE Indiana
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Originally Posted by Blinx View Post
I'd be interested in seeing a "behind the scenes" version of the show. What we see is a neat presentation of the facts, all tied up in a bow, that seems to happen over a few days. How many months of digging and searching were done my how many researchers to find these interesting ancestors? I'd love to know how they verify their facts, that THIS John Smith is the one associated with the celebrity, and not all the other John Smith's out there.
Here's a link you might find interesting: Marian's Roots and Rambles: Behind the Scenes at "Who Do You Think You Are?"
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Old 09-06-2013, 07:03 AM
 
Location: NW Philly Burbs
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Originally Posted by Cindiana View Post
Thanks SO much for the link!! It really answers a lot of questions:

Quote:
A typical episode is 500-700 hours collectively for all the researchers involved.
They research the celebrity's entire family, looking for the interesting stories.
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