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Old 08-07-2013, 05:06 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
18,109 posts, read 17,243,534 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TracySam View Post
Okay, getting a little tired of the "one ancestor per episode" theme.

Yes, it was interesting to learn about Chelsea Handler's grandfather, but that's not what I think draws the genealogy enthusiasts who are the core audience for WDYTYA. We want more ancestors and connections!



Aside from that, I was particularly struck by comparing what the grandfather went through with what my own recently discovered family member went through. My family member fought for the Allies in WWII, and was a POW of the Germans for 2 years, about the same timeframe as when Chelsea's grandfather was a POW of the Americans.

The US POWs arrived in their German prison camps relatively healthy and well nourished, and after 2 years ended up sickly and malnourished. The German POWs arrived in their prison camps in the US sickly and malnourished, and after two years were strong, healthy, and well nourished. And my ancestor was an officer housed in a supposed state of the art humane camp just for officers. Chelsea Handler's grandfather was a low level enlisted guy who even had to do farm work in his US camp. But he was better off than my guy.
It's pretty clear that the German POWs were much better off--no wonder a whole lot of them came back to the US with their families after the war.

I really liked the part where Chelsea talked with the American vet on that beach in France--I cried.
That part must have been very emotional for you with your ancestor's background. I didn't know the Americans treated the prisoners well and the Germans didn't, that's interesting. I'm wondering if it was just because the Germans were mean or because they were losing the war and running out of supplies. Just curious.

I, too, would like to see more tracing of the families back over the generations. No one just goes to their grandfather and then....stops. Ha! We know better. It's an addiction and you can't have just one, you have to keep on going. That's why we love genealogy.
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Old 08-07-2013, 05:36 PM
 
Location: Lone Star State to Peach State
3,697 posts, read 3,292,597 times
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I thought in the previous seasons, they had 2 or 3 "stars" per episode.

That was a great hour.
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Old 08-07-2013, 11:41 PM
bjh bjh started this thread
Status: "Peace." (set 13 hours ago)
 
Location: Memphis - home of the king
26,309 posts, read 22,833,476 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TracySam View Post
Okay, getting a little tired of the "one ancestor per episode" theme.

Yes, it was interesting to learn about Chelsea Handler's grandfather, but that's not what I think draws the genealogy enthusiasts who are the core audience for WDYTYA. We want more ancestors and connections!



Aside from that, I was particularly struck by comparing what the grandfather went through with what my own recently discovered family member went through. My family member fought for the Allies in WWII, and was a POW of the Germans for 2 years, about the same timeframe as when Chelsea's grandfather was a POW of the Americans.

The US POWs arrived in their German prison camps relatively healthy and well nourished, and after 2 years ended up sickly and malnourished. The German POWs arrived in their prison camps in the US sickly and malnourished, and after two years were strong, healthy, and well nourished. And my ancestor was an officer housed in a supposed state of the art humane camp just for officers. Chelsea Handler's grandfather was a low level enlisted guy who even had to do farm work in his US camp. But he was better off than my guy.
It's pretty clear that the German POWs were much better off--no wonder a whole lot of them came back to the US with their families after the war.

I really liked the part where Chelsea talked with the American vet on that beach in France--I cried.
As the war wound down and the Germans were being overpowered they hardly had food for themselves. Same can be seen from the US Civil War when the Confederacy has been represented as cruel to their prisoners for starving them. They simply didn't have the resources to feed them.
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Old 08-07-2013, 11:46 PM
bjh bjh started this thread
Status: "Peace." (set 13 hours ago)
 
Location: Memphis - home of the king
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gilah G. View Post
I thought in the previous seasons, they had 2 or 3 "stars" per episode.

That was a great hour.

They had one celebrity per episode in the previous seasons, but they focused more broadly on the families. They didn't focus as much on one or two ancestors. This newer focus makes these episodes a lot less interesting imo. Even so I'm still glad they brought the show back.
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Old 08-07-2013, 11:53 PM
bjh bjh started this thread
Status: "Peace." (set 13 hours ago)
 
Location: Memphis - home of the king
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I thought it was unfortunate that Handler made such a point to tell us how she is proud to be a Jewish-American, when genetically she is equally a German-American. The irony is that according to traditional Jewish custom: she's not Jewish, because that lineage is only recognized when it comes through the mother and her mother was of German, non-Jewish descent.
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Old 08-08-2013, 12:03 AM
 
Location: Lone Star State to Peach State
3,697 posts, read 3,292,597 times
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Why was it unfortunate.
She explained they were raised Jewish.
Judaism is what she is familiar with not her German side.
There are many debates about this. As far as I am concerned,
She lived, lives a Jewish life.
She was brought up in this tradition, religion, and family.
She wasn't brought up with her grandfathers tradition, religion.

I don't see anything Unfortunate about her being Proud to be a Jewish American.
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Old 08-08-2013, 02:46 AM
 
Location: In the Pearl of the Purchase, Ky
6,985 posts, read 12,409,375 times
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The one thing my wife and I said about this show when it was on NBC and still feel this way, is they should do some shows tracing the families of some normal person off the street who would love to have someone do their geneology but can't afford it. Not like these celebrities who could afford to do this.


[quote=TracySam;3085219

The US POWs arrived in their German prison camps relatively healthy and well nourished, and after 2 years ended up sickly and malnourished. The German POWs arrived in their prison camps in the US sickly and malnourished, and after two years were strong, healthy, and well nourished. And my ancestor was an officer housed in a supposed state of the art humane camp just for officers. Chelsea Handler's grandfather was a low level enlisted guy who even had to do farm work in his US camp. But he was better off than my guy.
It's pretty clear that the German POWs were much better off--no wonder a whole lot of them came back to the US with their families after the war.

I really liked the part where Chelsea talked with the American vet on that beach in France--I cried.[/quote]


TracySam, I have heard of personal experiences of people seeing the German POWs in the US. Camp Breckinridge, near Morganfield, Ky. was a POW camp during WWII. If a farmer in the area needed help around the farm, or just someone needed work on their house, all they had to do was go to Camp Breckinridge and get a few POWs. They were good workers and more than happy to get out.
This might not tie in to this thread, but it does a little bit. One German, while at Breckinridge, painted murals on the walls of the Officer's Club, of the Germany he remembered. He died here and was buried in Elizabethtown, Ky., leaving a wife and 2 year old daughter.
Camp Breckinridge Museum and Arts Center
Several years ago when the building was turned into a museum and arts center. When the center was opened, officials found his daughter, who was 2 when he died and now in her 70s, and brought her to Kentucky to show her what her father had done and also to take her to his grave.

Last edited by kygman; 08-08-2013 at 02:47 AM.. Reason: Forgot something
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Old 08-08-2013, 09:50 AM
 
Location: 5,400 feet
2,223 posts, read 2,287,832 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bjh View Post
As the war wound down and the Germans were being overpowered they hardly had food for themselves. Same can be seen from the US Civil War when the Confederacy has been represented as cruel to their prisoners for starving them. They simply didn't have the resources to feed them.
I suggest that you read Andersonville by MacKinlay Kantor.
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Old 08-08-2013, 03:28 PM
Status: "happy again, no longer catless! t...." (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,431 posts, read 16,733,449 times
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Without getting into a historical debate, The Germans treated their pow's different depending on who they were. Nationality mattered. Russians were commonly sent to work camps or even concentration camps. English and American POW's were treated far worse than the expected standard, but better than others. It was common to deny Red Cross food packets and give them to German troops. Conditions in the camps were often terrible, locking men into an empty room in the winter with a few concentration style beds and the floor and no heat. They also singled out those of 'undesirable' status if they could. When checked in, usually by other pow's, all were listed as protestent and sometimes farmers. In one case, those who they knew to be Jewish and those they decided could be, along with suspected Catholics, were shipped off to a satalite work camp of a concentration camp called Berga. Of the three hundred, between the deadly work, starvation, and death march, two thirds of them died before liberation in a span of two months. They were taken from Stalag IX, called Bad Orb, which had the reputation for being one of the worse in the war. The huge amount of prisoners from the Bulge were marched there and forced into already overcrowded camps. Those had one of the highest death rated of the war due to the lack of food, shelter and sanitation.

The Germans did have little food and personal, but leaving that aside, treatment of Americans was still not 'proper'. When inspections would be done by the Red Cross, the stoves had coal, they had warm blankets and food and clean clothes. After they were gone, the coal and extra blankets and new clothes was taken. Still, Americans were the best treated of their prisoners and pilots the best of them due to the Luffwalf being in charge of them, not the army.

Of course the US didn't have any excuse not to treat pow's per the rules, but just the same did not have to choose to follow them. Actually treatment of Americans improved once there were Germans in the heartland as the Nazi reasoning assumed that just because they did it as a standard policy, abuse and theft would be used against their own. After the bulge, and the sheer numbers this policy slipped considerably. And even the US, after seeing what they Nazi's had done, committed some serious excesses against German POW's in retalittion post war, cutting the daily ration in one large riverside camp to that of concentration camp prisoners. Men died from trying to eat grass. It is a little known aberation but it did happen with offical command authority.

War is a terrible thing and the pow becomes the pawn and even those with good intention can take a dark road.
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Old 08-08-2013, 05:58 PM
bjh bjh started this thread
Status: "Peace." (set 13 hours ago)
 
Location: Memphis - home of the king
26,309 posts, read 22,833,476 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jiminnm View Post
I suggest that you read Andersonville by MacKinlay Kantor.
MacKinlay Kantor sold scripts for blacklisted communists. Not everyone swallows propaganda hook, line and sinker.
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