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Old 10-06-2014, 08:42 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
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I take anything I've found with a grain of salt, but I did "find" that Princes William/Harry and I share a multiple-times over great grandfather, through their mother.

That doesn't get my name on the succession list, however.
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Old 10-06-2014, 11:45 PM
 
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Originally Posted by MaryleeII View Post
How far back has anyone been able to trace their lineage? And at what point did you find your family migration from another country?

On my mother's side of the family I can go back to the 1620's to Normandy, France.

Last week National Public Radio ran a story about the small Missouri town where my grandmother was born and raised. The story is here: Saving A French Dialect That Once Echoed In The Ozarks : NPR

The NPR story is really about my mother's ancestry. (I was excited when I heard it on the radio.) Some people find it hard to believe that there is still one small Missouri town in 2014 where a few people still speak French. (They speak Pawpaw French, a 300-year-old form of French-Canadian Quebecois.)

All of the families from Old Mines, Missouri, have a similar heritage: They left Normandy in the 1620's and helped France colonize Quebec. Around 1720, they moved to Missouri and became the state's "pilgrims." They were among the first group of 300 Frenchmen to settle and colonize the state.
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Old 10-07-2014, 12:57 AM
Status: "happy again, no longer catless! t...." (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,421 posts, read 16,677,475 times
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Originally Posted by PA2UK View Post
I think it's such a shame that people feel white/Anglo-Saxon heritage is "boring" - it seems like just another form of white guilt. If you actually dig into the stories behind these people, I'll bet you find something really interesting. No ancestry is boring, especially when it comes to immigrant ancestors - no matter where they came from, they ALL have an interesting story to tell.
I know my ancestors are from Scotland, Ulster and England, and one line is anglo scandinavian. I'm really hoping when I do the dna it will be able to split off the smaller slices of the pie. I think its fascinating that the ulster ancestors seem to have been tricky. My dad's grandfather didn't come home one day and his grandmother was believed to know why, but despite much looking, nobody ever found out. And one gggrandfather left very suddenly and remarried, but somewhere in Ulster are the offstring of his wife and two children he left behind. Many of the family names are scandanivan origionally and I'd love to see what percent of me is them.

Its hardly boring, especially with the curiosities, and said ggggrandfather who left the one family, is also a gggrandfather since my grandfather's first wife was the aunt of the second wife.

To me thats far more interesting than having some surprise mix of dna.

Last edited by nightbird47; 10-07-2014 at 01:42 AM..
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Old 10-07-2014, 10:40 AM
 
2,468 posts, read 2,722,968 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RDM66 View Post
On my mother's side of the family I can go back to the 1620's to Normandy, France.

Last week National Public Radio ran a story about the small Missouri town where my grandmother was born and raised. The story is here: Saving A French Dialect That Once Echoed In The Ozarks : NPR

The NPR story is really about my mother's ancestry. (I was excited when I heard it on the radio.) Some people find it hard to believe that there is still one small Missouri town in 2014 where a few people still speak French. (They speak Pawpaw French, a 300-year-old form of French-Canadian Quebecois.)

All of the families from Old Mines, Missouri, have a similar heritage: They left Normandy in the 1620's and helped France colonize Quebec. Around 1720, they moved to Missouri and became the state's "pilgrims." They were among the first group of 300 Frenchmen to settle and colonize the state.
Thanks, RDM66, I really enjoy these types of stories about language history in the Americas (or anywhere else for that matter). I hadn't heard the term "pawpaw French." I had an older family friend from this region, who told me about some of this French-speakers years ago. This friend grew up in the 30s-40s himself and I recall him saying they were discouraged from speaking any French in the schools.
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Old 10-25-2014, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Salt Lake City
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Well, I just got through verifying that I can now identify all 64 of my 4th great-granparents. I'm pretty excited about that. After that, I can go further back on some of the lines, but I've also come to a bunch of dead ends.
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Old 10-26-2014, 10:47 AM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,477 posts, read 26,078,274 times
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Originally Posted by Katzpur View Post
Well, I just got through verifying that I can now identify all 64 of my 4th great-granparents. I'm pretty excited about that. After that, I can go further back on some of the lines, but I've also come to a bunch of dead ends.
I'm jealous. I cannot identify one set of third great grandparents and have two stubborn brick walls in that generation that create big gaps in the previous one.
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Old 10-26-2014, 01:45 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Katzpur View Post
Well, I just got through verifying that I can now identify all 64 of my 4th great-granparents. I'm pretty excited about that. After that, I can go further back on some of the lines, but I've also come to a bunch of dead ends.
That's really great, being able to identify that many ancestors to that level. Congrats to you.
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Old 10-30-2014, 09:59 PM
 
Location: Palm Coast FL
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Other relatives and ancestors traced our family, so I can't take any credit for it. We go back to about 1000AD with Bartholomew de Boynton in England. It looks like his father and father's father were both named Torchill Bovington, so that takes us back to 950AD but I don't feel like I know enough about this to add them.
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Old 11-01-2014, 09:59 PM
 
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I have traced my ancestors all the way to the 1500s and they came to the US from Ireland in the late 1600s. I saw they were Quakers. They settled on a plantation about 5 miles northwest of what is now Wilmington, Delaware. My 10th Great-Grandfather was one of the signers of William Penn's Great Charter.
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Old 11-03-2014, 04:29 AM
 
Location: Northampton, Mass.
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Originally Posted by xboxmas View Post
I have traced my ancestors all the way to the 1500s and they came to the US from Ireland in the late 1600s. I saw they were Quakers. They settled on a plantation about 5 miles northwest of what is now Wilmington, Delaware. My 10th Great-Grandfather was one of the signers of William Penn's Great Charter.

One of my grandparents was also descended from Quakers of early Pennsylvania (the immigrant ancestors came from Tippery Ireland to Lancaster county in 1717). Since the Religious Society of Friends kept very good records of all members, well as meetings, births marriages and deaths, genealogical and historical research is usually fairly easy at least---going back into the 17th century when the denomination first began in England.
Of this particular line I can comfortably trace it back to England before 1650, chiefly due to their good record keeping, and some: fortunately, because the family had at one time been landholders in southern England, we can reliably trace it back thru England to about the mid 1300s, when they apparently came from France (the surname was 'anglicized" after about 1400)...in France it was (tentatively) traced back one more generation to a man who was born around the year 1280 or so, though that is where things begin to get too fuzzy to be certain of.
That is by far the longest I can trace any of my own lines...most not more than about 1550-1650 (and one, my own surname, only to 1847!--reliably)...
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